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Kathy Coleman
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Kathleen Coleman is an American former child actor, known for playing Holly Marshall on the 1970s children's TV show Land of the Lost.

In 1974, she was cast by Sid and Marty Kroft to play Holly Marshall, the younger of two siblings trapped with their father in a strange land in Land of the Lost. It was her only major television role, which continued for three seasons. She contributed interviews and commentary tracks for the Land of the Lost DVDs produced by Rhino in 2004. She and fellow Land of the Lost cast member Wesley Eure filmed cameos for the 2009 film parodying the series, but those scenes were not included in the theatrical release. She appeared in an episode of the police drama Adam-12 in 1975. In 2015, Coleman published Lost Girl: The Truth and Nothing But the Truth, So Help Me Kathleen, In 2017, she published a second memoir, entitled Run Holly Run, which highlighted her time working on Land of the Lost.

Larry Manetti
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Larry Manetti is an American actor best known for his role as Orville Wilbur Richard "Rick" Wright on the CBS television series Magnum, P.I. which starred Tom Selleck as the title character. He also starred in Baa Baa Black Sheep as First Lieutenant Robert A. "Bobby" Boyle, a pilot in the VMF-214 squadron headed by Greg "Pappy" Boyington (played by Robert Conrad).

Manetti studied acting in Chicago with the Ted Liss Players. His first television role was as a young detective in Jack Webb's Chase (1973–74). He would go on to play pilot "Bobby Boyle" in Baa Baa Black Sheep (1976–78) with Robert Conrad. He followed this up with a role as a bookie on the short-lived NBC series, The Duke (1979), which also featured Conrad in the title role. Manetti's signature role on Magnum, P.I. lasted for the entire eight-year run of the series (1980–88). He also had co-starring roles in 25 feature films and guest starred on many other television shows, including Rockford Files, Emergency!, Tenspeed and Brownshoe, Fantasy Island , Battlestar Galactica, Renegade, Quantum Leap, JAG and Walker, Texas Ranger. Manetti also had a minor role in the 1993 film CIA II: Target Alexa. It was announced on January 24, 2013, that Manetti had joined CBS's revived version of Hawaii Five-0 in the recurring role of "Nicky 'The Kid' Demarco". The character is described as "a local lounge legend ... [who], back in the day, was mentored by the one and only Frank Sinatra." In October 2019, he appeared in the revival of Magnum P.I., playing the same character. Manetti is the author of the semi-autobiographical Aloha Magnum, based on his time on Magnum P.I. and anecdotes about fellow cast members and celebrities such as Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, and Michelle Pfeiffer. He used to host a "Celebrity Brunch" and once owned a restaurant in the Plaza Hotel & Casino, which was owned by his friend D. W. Barrick of Barrick Gaming Corporation.

Lucas Grabeel
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Lucas Grabeel is an American actor, singer, songwriter, and producer. He is best known for his role as Ryan Evans in the High School Musical film series (2006–2008). His other film appearances include Halloweentown High (2004), Return to Halloweentown (2006), Alice Upside Down (2007), and The Adventures of Food Boy (2008). He appeared as a young Lex Luthor and Conner Kent in the television series Smallville (2006–2011).

In 2011, Grabeel released his debut extended play, Sunshine. He went on to play Toby Kennish in the ABC Freeform drama series Switched at Birth (2011–2017). He also provided the voice of Deputy Peck in the Disney Junior television series Sheriff Callie's Wild West (2014–2017) and the title character in the Netflix series Pinky Malinky (2019).

Patrick Wayne
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Patrick Wayne, is an American actor. He is the second son of movie star John Wayne. He made over 40 films, including eleven with his father. Later in his career, Wayne became a television host with the 1980 variety program The Monte Carlo Show and the 1990 revival of Tic-Tac-Dough.

He made nine movies with his father: Rio Grande (1950), The Quiet Man (1952), The Searchers (1956), The Alamo (1960), The Comancheros (1961), Donovan's Reef (1963), McLintock! (1963), The Green Berets (1968) and Big Jake (1971). Patrick made his film debut at age 11 in his father's film Rio Grande. He followed that with films directed by John Ford: The Quiet Man (1952), The Sun Shines Bright (1953), The Long Gray Line (1955), Mister Roberts (1955) and The Searchers (1956). Other television work included the baseball teleplay Rookie of the Year (1955), directed by John Ford and starring John Wayne, and Flashing Spikes (1962), a baseball television anthology installment directed by Ford and starring James Stewart, with John Wayne in an extended cameo role. Patrick Wayne played similar roles in both shows as baseball players. Following high school, Patrick attended Loyola Marymount University, where he was a member of Alpha Delta Gamma fraternity; he graduated in 1961. During this time, he struck out on his own to star in his own film The Young Land (1959). He supported his father in The Alamo, Donovan's Reef, McLintock! and The Green Berets. He also appeared in Ford's sprawling epic Cheyenne Autumn (1964), as James Stewart's son in Shenandoah (1965), in An Eye for an Eye (1966), The Deserter (1971), and in a lead role in The Bears and I for Walt Disney (1974). Patrick also served a tour of duty with the United States Coast Guard from 1961 to 1965. Following work on his father's 1971 film Big Jake, Wayne earned recognition in the sci-fi genre. His career peaked in the late 1970s in the popular matinee fantasy Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger (1977), then in The People That Time Forgot (1977). Wayne also screen-tested for the title role of Superman.[1] He co-starred as a romantic love interest to Shirley Jones in the brief TV series Shirley (1979). He was the host of The Monte Carlo Show in 1980 and occasionally worked on game shows and syndicated variety series. Wayne had many appearances on popular television series of the 1970s and 1980s, including Fantasy Island (1978), Murder, She Wrote (1984), Charlie's Angels (1976), Sledge Hammer! (1986), and The Love Boat. Wayne appeared in the movie Young Guns (1988) as Pat Garrett. He also did a comic turn in the Western spoof Rustler's Rhapsody (1985).

Phillip Paley
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Phillip Paley is an American actor known only for taking the role of Cha-Ka in the 1974 American television series Land of the Lost.

Born in Los Angeles, California, Paley began his acting career at age ten on the cult children's TV series Land of the Lost. He was discovered for the role by becoming a karate black belt at age nine and consequently appearing on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson with Chuck Norris. In 1988 he starred in a Roger Corman teen exploitation comedy titled Beach Balls.

RJ Mitte
Saturday Only!
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Roy Frank "RJ" Mitte III (born August 21, 1992) is an American actor, best known for playing Walter "Flynn" White Jr. on the AMC series Breaking Bad (2008–2013). Like his character on the show, he has cerebral palsy. After moving to Hollywood in 2006, he began training with personal talent manager Addison Witt. They sought acting opportunities where his disability would serve to educate viewers, which led him to audition for the role in Breaking Bad.

After receiving several roles as an extra, including in the Disney series Hannah Montana, Mitte became interested in films and decided to take acting lessons. Shortly after, he was offered the role of Walter White Jr., a character who also has cerebral palsy, in the AMC series Breaking Bad.[1] At the 2013 Media Access Awards, Mitte received the SAG-AFTRA Harold Russell Award for his portrayal of Walter White Jr. on the series and also presented the eponymous RJ Mitte Diversity Award to deaf actor Ryan Lane. The Screen Actors Guild named Mitte as the spokesman for actors with disabilities and he is the representative of "Inclusion in the Arts and Media of Performers with Disabilities", which employs artists with disabilities. In 2011, he starred in the short horror film Stump. That same year, he worked as executive producer of the documentary Vanished: The Tara Calico Story, that deals with the disappearance of Tara Calico. In 2012 Mitte was cast in the thriller film House of Last Things. In 2013, Mitte appeared in the music video for "Dead Bite" by rapcore band Hollywood Undead. He also appeared in the video for a song titled "If I Get High" by Nothing But Thieves in 2016. In January 2014, he began a recurring role on the ABC Family drama series Switched at Birth portraying Campbell, a premed student paralyzed from a snowboarding accident who uses a wheelchair. On 17 November 2015, Mitte was announced to be a presenter as part of British Channel 4's coverage of the 2016 Rio Summer Paralympics.

Wesley Eure
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Wesley Eure is an American actor, singer, author, producer, director and educator. He is best known for appearing as Michael Horton on the American soap opera Days of Our Lives from 1974 to 1981, during which he also starred on the popular children's television series Land of the Lost. He later hosted the popular children's game show Finders Keepers in 1987 and 1988, and co-created the children's educational television show Dragon Tales in 1999.

Eure wanted to be an actor since the age of five, his love of performing stemming from a need for attention. While the family lived in Illinois, he enrolled in a summer program at Northwestern University, where he took acting lessons and won an award. His first break came when he was 17 years old and working part-time at the New Frontier Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas selling artwork. He was hired as a driver for Robert Goulet and Carol Lawrence during their summer tour.[He spent most of 1968 and 1969 as their driver. After the Goulet-Lawrence tour ended in New York City, Eure decided he would not return to high school and stayed.[After a few short months of auditions and odd jobs, in 1970 Eure became a cast member at the American Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Connecticut.[Hired more for his ability to make the cast and crew laugh than his acting skill, Eure worked with a dialect coach to get rid of his deep Southern accent. During his time in Stratford, he worked with Jane Alexander in The Tempest, and appeared in Mourning Becomes Electra, Merry Wives of Windsor, Twelfth Night, and many original works produced by the company.[citation needed] At the Bucks County Playhouse in Pennsylvania, he performed in West Side Story (portraying "Action" of the Jets) and then joined a musical comedy revue and traveled throughout the East Coast resort areas. Eure moved to Los Angeles in 1973 after discovering it was cheaper to live there, but offered just as much opportunity to become an actor. He was hired to star in a pilot for a Kaye Ballard TV series, The Organic Vegetables, created and produced by the team behind The Monkees. When that series was not picked up due to the 1973 writers' strike, Eure answered an ad in an industry trade publication to audition for a television show. He learned that David Cassidy was threatening to leave The Partridge Family, and that the audition was for a role as a "neighbor boy" who would take over the lead in the family band from Cassidy. Eure won the audition, but never joined The Partridge Family after Cassidy agreed to stay on. The show was canceled before the next season started. In 1974, Eure auditioned for and won a role on NBC's Days of Our Lives. Eure had previously met producer Sid Krofft and was committed to do an audition for a new children's show he was working on. When Eure flew to New York City at the request of Broadway producer David Merrick to try out for a role in a theatrical production of Candide, he didn't want to audition for Krofft due to his commitment to Days (and because he'd be playing a 16-year-old boy). But Eure auditioned and won the role of Will Marshall on Land of the Lost. He kept his commitment to both shows after the Kroffts repeatedly asked him to star on Land of the Lost. From 1974 to 1981, Eure starred on NBC's Days of Our Lives, playing the role of Mike Horton.He also starred as Will Marshall in Sid and Marty Krofft's children's adventure series, Land of the Lost from 1974 to 1976, filming this show and Days of Our Lives simultaneously. (The gold chain he wore on the show was a gift from his then-lover.)As a publicity stunt, Eure agreed to be billed simply as "Wesley" on Land of the Lost, although he later regretted the decision. Eure's stardom in the 1970s led to a number of appearances on game shows. He was repeatedly asked to appear on both Password and Match Game. He appeared on Password so often that he became a semi-regular on the show. He earned $2,000 to do a week's worth of shows (five shows), which took a single day to shoot. In 1987, Eure became host of the Nickelodeon children's game show Finders Keepers, and continued in this role through 1988. When the show was sold to Fox for its 1989 (and final) season, Fox declined to hire Eure as host. Eure co-produced, wrote and acted in Fox Television's hidden-camera show Totally Hidden Video (which aired from 1989 to 1992).[He also co-created Dragon Tales, PBS Kids's Emmy-nominated animated series for preschoolers which began airing in 1999, and directed Spy TV for NBC in 2001. Eure appeared in 1978 as a murderer in The Toolbox Murders[12] and as an evil man who is eaten by snakes in Jennifer. While filming Jennifer, Eure claims he had a difficult time working with the various snakes on the set, including the large boa constrictor that features in the climax. He later appeared in Hanna-Barbera's 1979 comedy C.H.O.M.P.S., which also starred Valerie Bertinelli, Red Buttons, Jim Backus, Hermione Baddeley, and Conrad Bain. Eure and Land of the Lost co-star Kathy Coleman filmed cameo appearances for the 2009 film Land of the Lost starring Will Ferrell, but were edited out of the final cut.

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Carel Struycken
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Carel Struycken is a Dutch actor. He is known for playing the Giant/Fireman in the television series Twin Peaks (1990–1991, 2017), the occasional guest role of Mr. Homn in Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987–1992), and the household butler Lurch in the three 1990s Addams Family films. He also appeared in the films Gerald's Game (2017) and Doctor Sleep (2019).

In 1978, Struycken was discovered as an actor at the corner of Hollywood and Vine in Los Angeles by a woman who had abandoned her car in the middle of the street, calling after him: "We need you for a movie!". The film was Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Struycken played Terak in the 1985 TV film Ewoks: The Battle for Endor, a spin-off to the original Star Wars trilogy. Struycken appeared as Fidel, Jack Nicholson's manservant, in the 1987 film The Witches of Eastwick. That same year, he appeared as Mr. Homn in "Haven", an episode of the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation, a role he would reprise in four more episodes until 1992. In 1991, he starred as butler Lurch in the feature film The Addams Family. He reprised the role in the 1993 sequel, Addams Family Values, and the TV movie Addams Family Reunion. Director Barry Sonnenfeld also picked Struycken for a small role in Men in Black. He portrayed the mystical guide-character "The Giant" in David Lynch and Mark Frost's hit 1990–91 ABC television series Twin Peaks. He also appears in the 2017 sequel series, Twin Peaks: The Return. He appears as the "Moonlight Man" in the 2017 Netflix original movie Gerald's Game.

Cynthia Pepper
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is a blonde American actress whose principal work was accomplished during the early 1960s.

In 1960, Pepper appeared three episodes of two ABC detective series, Bourbon Street Beat, with Andrew Duggan and Richard Long, and 77 Sunset Stripwith Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., Roger Smith, and Edd Byrnes. In 1960-1961, she was cast as next-door teenager Jean Pearson, the romantic interest of young Mike Douglas, played by Tim Considine, in Fred MacMurrays long-running My Three Sons. The next year, Pepper starred in her own 26-week series, Margie in the role of the Roaring Twenties teenager Margie Clayton. Pepper was actually twenty-one at the time Margie went on the air. Margie followed My Three Sons on the ABC Thursday night schedule. Her costars on Margie included Penny Parker as her friend Maybelle Jackson and Tommy Ivo as boyfriend Haywood Botts. Character actor Dave Willock played her father, Harvey Clayton. Wesley Marie Tackitt portrayed her mother, Nora Clayton. On February 2, 1962, just weeks before Margie ended its run, Pepper appeared as herself on the program Here's Hollywood with hostess Helen O'Connell. The program interviewed celebrities, often at their homes. After Margie, Pepper appeared in 1964 as Corporal Midge Riley with Elvis Presley in the film Kissin' Cousins. In 2002-2003, she appeared in television documentaries about Presleys life and recalled her own experiences with him. In 1964, Pepper returned to My Three Sons for a final guest appearance. The story line had her returning to fictitious Bryant Park and hoping to see Mike Douglas one more time only to learn he is engaged to Sally Ann Morrison. Thereafter, her roles were limited to guest appearances on such series as The Addams Family with John Astin, Julia with Diahann Carroll and Lloyd Nolan, The Flying Nun with Sally Field, and the short-lived The Jimmy Stewart Show in 1972.

Deep Roy
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Deep Roy, is a Kenyan-British actor, puppeteer and stuntman. At 132 centimetres (4 ft 4 in) tall, he has often been cast as diminutive characters, such as Teeny Weeny in The NeverEnding Story and the Oompa-Loompas in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Keenser in Star Trek, and subsequent films ("Kelvin Timeline"), and in television series such as The X-Files, Doctor Who, and Eastbound & Down.

He made his professional screen acting debut in a 1976 episode of The New Avengers, titled "Target!" as a character named Klokoe. He made his film debut later that same year, in The Pink Panther Strikes Again, as the Italian Assassin. Another early role was as Mr. Sin, the "pig-brained Peking Homunculus", a villain with a distinct appetite for homicide, in the Doctor Who serial The Talons of Weng-Chiang. In 1979, Roy also played a genetically engineered life form "Decima" in the first season Blake's 7 episode "The Web", the diminutive chess genius, "The Klute", in the second season Blake's 7 episode "Gambit" and he voiced the character "Moloch", in the third season Blake's 7 episode "Moloch". He portrayed the Jedi Master Yoda in Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back. He is uncredited on the film but can be seen in many behind-the-scenes photos dressed as Yoda for perspective shots filmed towards the end of production. He has played apes in two movies: Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes and again in the Tim Burton remake of Planet of the Apes (2001) in two roles, one as a young gorilla boy and as Thade's niece. He has worked for Burton in three other films, Big Fish (2003), Corpse Bride (2005), where he supplied General Bonesapart's voice, and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (also 2005). He played all the Oompa-Loompas (165 of them) in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory; Roy had extensive training for the role in dance, yoga, and some minor instrument playing. His great nephew is Wakehams Green FC central midfielder, Arun Purba. He has performed many other roles in movies and on television, including The X-Files, Flash Gordon, Return to Oz (as the Tin Woodman), Jim Henson's The Dark Crystal as a puppeteer extra, The NeverEnding Story as Teeny Weeny, the rider of the "racing snail", Alien from L.A., Howling VI: The Freaks as Mr Toones and Return of the Jedi as Droopy McCool.[6] He appeared in Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (2009) as an Egyptian border guard and in the film Star Trek (also 2009) as Keenser, Scotty's assistant on the ice planet Delta Vega; he reprised the Keenser role in the sequels Star Trek Into Darkness and Star Trek Beyond.

Diane McBain
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Diane McBain (born May 18, 1941) is an American actress who, as a Warner Brothers contract player, reached a brief peak of popularity during the early 1960s. She is best known for playing an adventurous socialite in the 1960–1962 TV series Surfside 6 and as one of Elvis Presley's leading ladies in 1966's Spinout.

Starting with the September 13, 1955, premiere of the hour-long, three-shows-in-one Warner Brothers Presents, the studio's TV arm, Warner Brothers Television, provided ABC with nearly 20 shows, including seven Westerns and four detective series. At the age of 17, she was immediately put to work, making her TV acting debut in two episodes of Maverick, March 8 with Jack Kelly and November 22, 1959, with James Garner, as well as the October 16 episode of 77 Sunset Strip. Her first director, at the helm of the March 8 installment, "Passage to Fort Doom", was veteran actor Paul Henreid. Having received a positive reaction to McBain's initial performances, the studio realized it had a potential star under contract. She was given a prominent ingenue role in her first feature, the $3.5 million Ice Palace (1960) alongside Richard Burton and Robert Ryan. The filmed-on-location Technicolor epic was released on January 2, 1960, to mixed reviews, but McBain's notices were generally favorable Warner Bros continued to keep McBain busy during 1960 with numerous appearances on its TV shows. She returned to 77 Sunset Strip on February 26, then nine days later found herself in Alaska with a guest role in the March 6 installment of The Alaskans, starring Roger Moore. Eight days later, she was in Bourbon Street Beat and the following day on Sugarfoot. Another episode of Bourbon Street Beat followed two weeks later on March 28, and still another 77 Sunset Strip on May 6. In eight more days, she was in an episode of Lawman, and three weeks thereafter, on June 6, a third episode of Bourbon Street Beat in as many months. On March 1 and 2, 1967, during the second season of the ABC series Batman, she played socialite Pinkie Pinkston, a friend of Batman's alias Bruce Wayne. Warners gave McBain a regular role on Surfside 6 (1960–62), supporting Troy Donahue, Van Williams and Lee Patterson. Surfside 6 ran for two seasons. Films McBain had a banner year in 1960. In addition to appearing in a top feature film and guest-starring in eight TV episodes, she was assigned two more theatrical features. The first offered her one of three ingenue roles in a major "A" film, Parrish (1961), supporting Troy Donahue; the others were Connie Stevens and Sharon Hugueny. The film was a hit and made over $4 million Warners then gave McBain the star part in her own "B"-film vehicle, Claudelle Inglish (1961) when she replaced the original choice for the lead, Anne Francis, in the title role. It was based on a novel by Erskine Caldwell. Warners gave her another lead role in a feature, Black Gold (1962), but it was not a success. She returned to guest starring on shows like Hawaiian Eye. Producer Hall Bartlett borrowed McBain for a role in The Caretakers (1963) with Polly Bergen and Joan Crawford. When 77 Sunset Strip kicked off its sixth and final season in 1963 with a special five-part story called 'Five', McBain played opposite Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. as "Carla Stevens". She then supported Debbie Reynolds in Mary, Mary (1963). Her last film for Warners was A Distant Trumpet (1964) with Donahue and Suzanne Pleshette, the final film of director Raoul Walsh. In a 1964 interview she said she had "mostly been cast as the spoilt rich girl". Warners announced her for Sex and the Single Girl (1964) in the role of a secretary.She turned down the role and Warners elected not to renew her contract. McBain guest starred on Arrest and Trial, Wendy and Me, Kraft Suspense Theatre, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, Burke's Law (a number of times), The Wild Wild West, The Man from UNCLE and Vacation Playhouse "Disappearance" In August 1965 McBain's parents reported her as missing. It turned out she had checked herself into a hotel in San Diego under the name "Marilyn Miller" for "a change of faces, scenery and attitudes... I just wanted to be Miss Nobody from Nowhere." She said she had been despondent over a slackening income and not getting the type of roles she wanted. She was Elvis Presley's leading lady in Spinout (1966) alongside Shelley Fabares and Deborah Walley. She guest-starred on Batman. McBain made two films with Fabian Forte at American International Pictures, Thunder Alley (1967), directed by Richard Rush, and Maryjane (1968), directed by Maury Dexter. Dexter then put McBain in the lead of AIP's The Mini-Skirt Mob (1968), a hit at the box office. McBain supported Gardner McKay in I Sailed to Tahiti with an All Girl Crew (1968) and went to Crown International for Five the Hard Way (1969) aka The Sidehackers. She toured Vietnam in 1968 with Tippi Hedren and Joey Bishop 1970s and 1980s During the 1970s, McBain slowed her career somewhat to care for her son Evan, though she continued to make guest appearances in a number of television series. "I never really cared about superstardom, I only cared about the roles that were available to those who were superstars," she later said. "I was motivated to continue on in the face of total failure because I had a child to rear on my own with little help from his father. Acting was the best way for me to make money and the best way for me to be a more present mom in my son's life. Full-time jobs brought in money but kept me away from the day-to-day life of my child." McBain guest starred on Love, American Style, Mannix, To Rome with Love, Land of the Giants, and Mod Squad. She had roles in the features The Delta Factor (1970), The Wild Season (1971), Huyendo del halcón (1973), Wicked, Wicked (1973), and The Deathhead Virgin (1974), which she later called "the stupidest screenplay I ever had to work with." McBain also guested on the TV series The Wide World of Mystery, Police Story, Barbary Coast, and Marcus Welby, M.D.. Towards the end of the 1970s and in the early 1980s McBain was in Donner Pass: The Road to Survival (1978), The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams, Hawaii Five-O, Charlie's Angels, Eight Is Enough, Days of Our Lives, Dallas, Matt Houston, Airwolf, The Red Fury, Crazy Like a Fox, and Knight Rider. She also worked steadily in regional theatre.

Gilles Marini
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a French-American actor, known for his roles in the film Sex and the City and in the American television shows Brothers & Sisters, Switched at Birth and Devious Maids. He was also the runner-up in season 8 of Dancing with the Stars, and was one of the returning celebrities in season 15, also a French Co-Host on Ultimate Beastmaster.

He played Dante in Sex and the City: The Movie, and has appeared on Brothers & Sisters, Ugly Betty, Dirty Sexy Money, Criminal Minds, Nip/Tuck, The Bold and the Beautiful, Passions, and 2 Broke Girls. His film credits include One and the Other (L'Une et L'Autre) and The Boys & Girls Guide to Getting Down. On February 8, 2009, it was announced that Marini would participate in the eighth season of Dancing with the Stars. His professional partner was Cheryl Burke. He also took part in the fifteenth season of Dancing with the Stars for another chance to win the mirrorball trophy. He danced with season fourteen winner, Peta Murgatroyd. They were the eighth couple eliminated from the competition, alongside Kirstie Alley and Maksim Chmerkovskiy. He was introduced as a recurring character on ABC's family drama Brothers & Sisters. He played Luc Laurent, the French love interest of Rachel Griffiths' character Sarah Walker in what was originally supposed to be a five-episode arc, but was promoted to a series regular.The series was cancelled in May 2011, after the fifth season ended. He also appears as Bay Kennish's biological father, Angelo Sorrento, in Switched at Birth. On September 18, 2012, it was announced that he would become a series regular for the second season.

Glenn Scarpelli
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Glenn Christopher Scarpelli is an American former child actor and singer. He played Alex Handris from 1980 to 1983 on the sitcom One Day at a Time

In 1977, at the age of 10, Scarpelli made his Broadway debut, appearing in the play Golda with Anne Bancroft. He returned to the stage in 1979 with the role of Richard, Duke of York in the Broadway revival of Richard III starring Al Pacino. Scarpelli's role as Alex Handris (1980–83) on the long-running television situation comedy One Day at a Time is his most prominent. He left that sitcom to appear in the NBC sitcom Jennifer Slept Here. Other television appearances include 3-2-1 Contact, Steven Spielberg's Amazing Stories, MacGyver and The Love Boat. He was also a co-host in summer 1983 of the NBC game show/human interest show Fantasy. He released a self-titled pop album in 1983, which included the single "Get a Love On". More recently, Scarpelli had a cameo role in the Netflix revival of One Day at a Time during its third season, released in 2019.

James Darren
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Darren was discovered by talent agent and casting director Joyce Selznick after he got some photographs taken by Maurice Seymour to show potential agents: "His secretary, a woman by the name of Yvonne Bouvier, asked me if I was interested in getting into film. I said yeah, I was. She said I know someone you should meet. She set up a meeting between me and Joyce Selznick, who worked for Screen Gems. I went down to 1650 Broadway, the Brill Building. On my way to a meeting with Joyce, we just happened to get on the elevator at the same time. She kept staring at me. I never met her. She never met me. We got off at the same floor and walked to the same office. That was our meeting. Joyce brought me over to Columbia Pictures about a week later and got me a contract there."

Columbia signed Darren to a long-term contract in July 1956. A few weeks later he was filming his first film, Rumble on the Docks (1956), a low budget "B" movie produced by Sam Katzman, where Darren played the lead.Darren's appearance was well received and he got a lot of fan mail – second at the studio only to Kim Novak. Darren guest starred on an episode of TV's The Web ("Kill and Run") then Columbia gave him a support role in an "A" picture, the comedy Operation Mad Ball (1957), starring Jack Lemmon. He had support roles in two films directed by Phil Karlson: The Brothers Rico (1957), a film noir, playing the brother of Richard Conte; and Gunman's Walk (1958), a Western with Van Heflin and Tab Hunter. In between he was second billed in another movie for Katzman, The Tijuana Story (1957), although his role was relatively small. Darren was third billed in the surf film, Gidget (1959), starring Sandra Dee and Cliff Robertson, playing Moondoggie. He also sang the title track. "They were thinking about having someone do the vocal and I would lip sync", he recalled. "I told them I could do it. So we went into one of the sound stages and I sang 'Gidget'. They said, 'He sings fine,' then I did all the other songs." The film was a hit with teen audiences and so was the song. Darren wound up recording a string of pop hits for Colpix Records, the biggest of which was "Goodbye Cruel World" (#3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1961). It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc He also recorded this song in excellent Italian, as "Addio Mondo Crudele", which was very successful in Europe. Another sizeable hit was "Her Royal Majesty" (#6 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1962). He is also featured in one of the Scopitone series of pop music video jukebox films ("Because You're Mine"). Twice, in 1959 and 1961, Darren played teen idols on episodes of The Donna Reed Show He did an episode of The Lineup (1959). Darren was third billed in a series of films for Columbia: The Gene Krupa Story (1959), a biopic with Sal Mineo; All the Young Men (1960), a Korean War movie with Alan Ladd and Sidney Poitier; and Let No Man Write My Epitaph (1960) with Burl Ives and Shelley Winters, which was a sequel to Knock On Any Door (1949). He had a cameo as himself in a teen film, Because They're Young (1960), singing the title track. Darren had a supporting role in the World War II film The Guns of Navarone (1961), a huge hit at the box office. However, Darren later said "The people handling my career at that point didn't really take advantage of it." Also popular was Gidget Goes Hawaiian (1961) where Darren reprised his role as Moondoggie; he had a new Gidget (Deborah Walley) and was given top billing. Darren had a good support role in a melodrama, Diamond Head (1962) with Charlton Heston. He played Moondoggie a third time in Gidget Goes to Rome (1962) which he later said he "hated... I didn't want to do it. I thought that I'd be doing those for the rest of my life." He sang the title track for Under the Yum Yum Tree (1963). In 1963 Darren signed a seven-picture deal with Universal, starting with The Lively Set (1963) That teamed him with Pamela Tiffin, who was also in For Those Who Think Young (1964), a teen film Darren made for United Artists. He was the singing voice of Yogi Bear in the animated film, Hey There, It's Yogi Bear! (1964), on the song "Ven-e, Ven-o, Ven-a". Prior to that, he was the singing voice of his own character "Jimmy Darrock" on an episode of The Flintstones. However, the character's dialogue was provided by voice actor Lennie Weinrib. Darren guest starred on an episode of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea as an Android Omar, that was produced by Irwin Allen. Allen then cast Darren in the lead of a series, as impulsive scientist and adventurer Tony Newman on the science fiction series, The Time Tunnel (1966–1967). When the series ended, Allen shot a brief pilot for a new series starring Darren, The Man from the 25th Century, but it was not picked up. Darren then went to Europe to make Venus in Furs (1969) for Jess Franco then was reunited with Allen in City Beneath the Sea (1971). In the 1970s, Darren performed regularly in night clubs. He focused on guest starring on TV series, such as Love, American Style; S.W.A.T.; Police Woman; Black Sheep Squadron; The Feather and Father Gang; Charlie's Angels; Police Story; Hawaii Five-O; Vegas; The Love Boat; and Fantasy Island. He had a role in the TV movie, The Lives of Jenny Dolan (1975) and the film The Boss' Son (1978). In the early 1980s Darren appeared on Scruples (1981), and One Day at a Time. Later Darren had a regular role as Officer III James Corrigan on the television police drama T. J. Hooker from 1983 to 1986. "Every career has its hills and valleys", Darren said in 1983. "The most important thing is that you are happy with you. Not anybody's career, no one that I know of, has always been climbing. It always levels out and you want to make sure you have good investments and financial security and bread on the table. If projects aren't coming to you, then you seek them out and you try to develop and put projects together." He directed some episodes and launched a career as a director, notably of action-based series, including Hunter, The A-Team, Silk Stalkings, Renegade, and Nowhere Man, as well as dramas such as Beverly Hills, 90210 and Melrose Place. He continued to act on such shows as Raven. In 1998, he achieved renewed popularity as a singer through his appearances on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine in the role of holographic crooner and adviser Vic Fontaine. His role in Deep Space Nine inspired his return to singing. Many of his vocal performances on the show were re-recorded for the album This One's from the Heart (1999) The album shows Darren, a close friend of Frank Sinatra, comfortably singing in the Sinatra style. The 2001 follow-up Because of You showed similar inspiration from Tony Bennett.

MacKenzie Phillips
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Mackenzie Phillips is an American actress and singer, known for her roles as Carol Morrison in the film American Graffiti, as rebellious but ultimately loving teenager Julie Mora Cooper Horvath on the sitcom One Day at a Time, and as Molly Phillips on the Disney Channel supernatural series So Weird.

Phillips was 12 years old during the filming of American Graffiti, and 13 when the movie was released. She was cast as Carol Morrison, a young girl accidentally picked up by hot rodding teenager John Milner (Paul Le Mat). Because of California state law, producer Gary Kurtz became Phillips' legal guardian for the duration of the filming. Phillips gained stardom in the 1970s when she played boy-crazy teenager Julie Cooper (when the character got married, her married name was Horvath) on the long-running television show One Day at a Time, for which she earned $50,000 (equal to $240,476 today) a week. During the show's third season in 1977, Phillips was arrested for disorderly conduct. Because of her drug and alcohol abuse, Phillips began arriving late and was even incoherent for rehearsals. The producers ordered her to take a six-week break to overcome her addiction but were ultimately forced to fire her in 1980. After two near-fatal overdoses, Phillips voluntarily entered Fair Oaks Hospital for rehab treatment. After she completed treatment in 1981, the producers of One Day at a Time invited her back to the show However, in 1982, Phillips relapsed into cocaine use and the following year, she collapsed on the show's set. When she refused to take a drug test, she was fired again, permanently; her character was written out of the series. In 1992 she entered a long-term drug rehab program and underwent intensive treatment for nine months. From the mid 1980s to the early 1990s, Phillips performed with a re-formed version of The Mamas & the Papas, known as The New Mamas and The Papas. In 1999, Phillips co-starred with Cara DeLizia in the Disney Channel series So Weird, playing a fictional rock star named Molly Phillips. She sang original songs written by show producers Jon Cooksey and Ann Marie Montade. In 2002, she appeared in the Disney Channel original movie Double Teamed. Phillips guest-starred on episodes of ER, Without a Trace, 7th Heaven, Cold Case, and Beverly Hills, 90210. Phillips won an Honorary Best Actress award on March 20, 2011, at the closing night awards gala of the Female Eye Film Festival in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, for her performance as Sharon in the 2010 independent film Peach Plum Pear. While in Toronto, she was interviewed on Canada AM, ET Canada, and The Marilyn Denis Show. In 2016, Phillips began working at the Breathe Life Healing Center in West Hollywood, California as a drug rehab counselor. In 2017, Phillips appeared in an episode of the rebooted One Day at a Time as Pam Valentine. The role was apt, given Phillips' history: she portrayed a counselor. She reprised the role in 2019, in two episodes of the third season. In 2018, Phillips appeared as Barbara Denning in multiple episodes of Netflix original Orange Is the New Black.

Melody Anderson
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Melody Anderson is a retired actress whose most high-profile role was playing Dale Arden in the 1980 adaptation of Flash Gordon. She later starred in the 1986 film Firewalker, with Chuck Norris. While singing, she also trained as an actress, leading to roles in films and television during the late 1970s and 1980s.

Returning to North America, Anderson's first national exposure was as a guest star in the 1977 series Logan's Run and as a "Sweathog" in a 1977 episode of Welcome Back, Kotter. She made numerous guest appearances on television, including Archie Bunker's Place, Battlestar Galactica, Dallas, T. J. Hooker, CHiPs, the pilot episode of The A-Team and The Fall Guy. She had recurring roles on St. Elsewhere and Jake and the Fatman. She was the female lead of the NBC 1983 series Manimal She was a guest star in the Murder, She Wrote episode "Prediction: Murder" in 1989. Anderson played the female lead Dale Arden in Flash Gordon (1980) and Janet Gillis in Dead and Buried (1981).In 1983, she played the title role in a made-for-television film called Policewoman Centerfold, in which her character, a divorced police officer, is fired after posing nude for a men's magazine (based loosely on the true story of Springfield, Ohio patrolwoman Barbara Schantz, who was subsequently fired from her job after posing nude in Playboy magazine in the early 1980s). In 1986 she appeared with Nicolas Cage in The Boy in Blue and with Chuck Norris in Firewalker. She starred in the made-for-television movie Beverly Hills Madam (1986), which starred Faye Dunaway.From 1992–93, Anderson portrayed Natalie Marlowe, and briefly her twin sister Janet Dillon, on the soap opera All My Children. She starred as Edie Adams in the television film Ernie Kovacs: Between the Laughter,opposite Jeff Goldblum as Ernie Kovacs and played the coveted role of Marilyn Monroe in the television movie Marilyn & Bobby: Her Final Affair (1993). Her last television appearance was in 1995 as a guest star in the short-lived CBS revival of Burke's Law

Paris Themmen
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Paris Themmen – Appeared as a child actor in three Broadway shows, two dozen commercials and various television shows including “Star Trek, Voyager” but he is best known as “Mike Tee Vee”, one of the five lucky Golden Ticket winners in the (1971) cult-classic film, “Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory”.

As an adult he has had a variety of careers in Travel, Real Estate, Finance, Imagineering and Film Production. An avid traveler, he has backpacked through 61 countries on 6 continents. He currently resides with his wife, Nikki Grillos and his two cats, Lilibet and Winston in Los Angeles, CA. Both Paris and Nikki have appeared on Jeopardy (Nikki was a two-time champion).

Richard Masur
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Richard Masur is an American character actor, who has appeared in more than 80 films. From 1995 to 1999, he served two terms as president of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG). He is best known for Nick Lobo on Rhoda (1974-1977), Stanley Uris in the tv miniseries It (1990), and Edward L. L. Moore on Younger (2016-2018).

Masur studied acting at The Yale School of Drama and appeared on stage before acting in movies and television shows during the 1970s. He appeared on an episode of The Waltons as well as in an episode of All in the Family in late 1974 and had recurring roles in Rhoda from 1974 to 1978; One Day at a Time from 1975 to 1976; Hot l Baltimore in 1975; and the pilot to an NBC sitcom, Bumpers, in 1977. In 1981, Masur played the role of a child molestor armed with a camera in the television film Fallen Angel. His next project was the 1982 horror/sci-fi The Thing, as the dog handler, Clark. The film has acquired a significant cult following in the years since its release, and Masur occasionally reunites with former The Thing cast members for Q&A panels at fan conventions. Masur played the father to Corey Haim's character in 1988's License to Drive and was part of the ensemble cast of the 1990 TV miniseries adaptation of Stephen King's It. Masur played the role of a character modeled after Jewish-American spy Jonathan Pollard in the film Les Patriotes (The Patriots) (1994), by French director Éric Rochant. In January 2006, Masur began appearing as a recurring character on the soap opera All My Children. He has also appeared in guest spots on many TV shows, including M*A*S*H, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Hawaii Five-O, Happy Days, Picket Fences, Matlock, Murphy Brown, Law & Order, Kevin (Probably) Saves the World, and Transparent.

Robert Wuhl
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Robert Wuhl ) is an American actor, comedian and writerHe is best known as the creator and star of the television comedy series Arliss (1996–2002)and for his portrayal of newspaper reporter Alexander Knox in Tim Burton's Batman (1989) and Larry in Bull Durham (1988)

Wuhl's first role in movies was a starring role in the 1980 comedy The Hollywood Knights along with other fledgling actors Tony Danza, Michelle Pfeiffer and Fran Drescher, followed by a small role in the film Flashdance (1983). Wuhl then had larger roles in movies including Good Morning, Vietnam (1987) with Robin Williams, Bull Durham (1988) with Kevin Costner, Tim Burton's 1989 Batman (as reporter Alexander Knox) with Michael Keaton, Blaze (1989) with Paul Newman,Missing Pieces (1991) with Eric Idle, Mistress (1992) with Robert De Niro, Blue Chips (1994) with Nick Nolte, and Cobb (1994) with Tommy Lee Jones. He wrote two of the six episodes for the TV series Police Squad! in 1982, and did an audio commentary for its release on DVD in 2006. Wuhl once appeared on The Dating Game and The $10,000 Pyramid. Wuhl appeared with Keith Carradine in the 1985 music video to Madonna's hit "Material Girl". In 1992, he appeared in The Bodyguard as host of the Oscars. In reality he won two Emmy Awards for co-writing the Academy Awards in 1990 and 1991 with Billy Crystal. From 1996 to 2002 he wrote and starred in the HBO series Arli$$ as the title character, an agent for high-profile athletes. From 2000 to 2001, he was a frequent panelist on the ESPN game show 2 Minute Drill, often quizzing the contestants on sports-related movies. Wuhl was a player in the Game Show Network's Poker Royale series, a competition between pros and comedians. In 2006, he starred on HBO in a one-man-show, Assume the Position with Mr. Wuhl,[2] where he taught a history class to show how history is created and propagated in a similar fashion to pop culture. A second chapter entitled Assume the Position 201 with Mr. Wuhl aired on HBO in July 2007. Wuhl is currently developing a stage adaptation of "Assume the Position" at Ars Nova in New York City. He also hosted a sports, sports business and entertainment daily talk radio show,for Westwood One (now Dial Global) from January through December 2011. Wuhl occasionally fills in for Boomer Esiason on the Boomer and Carton show. He played a judge on the TNT series Franklin & Bash. He played Herb Tucker in a revival of Neil Simon's 1979 play I Ought to Be in Pictures. In 2015, Wuhl portrayed himself on American Dad!, in the episode "Manhattan Magical Murder Mystery Tour". He then returned in 2017 to play himself again in the episode "The Talented Mr. Dingleberry". In 2019, he returned in the episode "One-Woman Swole" portraying himself as a judge in a bodybuilding contest.

Tanya Lemani
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Tania Lemani played Kara in the Star Trek: The Original Series second season episode "Wolf in the Fold". She filmed her scenes on Monday 3 July 1967 at Desilu Stage 10.

Tania was born in Iran to Russian parents. When she was 13 years old, her family came to America where Lemani began her career with a classical ballet dance troupe, but when she traveled to Las Vegas in search of more work, she was offered a job as a belly dancer, not a ballet dancer. She ultimately got her own show in Vegas, as well as offers to dance on television and film. She also began receiving more serious acting roles after a member of her show's audience offered her a role in the pilot for Alexander the Great, starring William Shatner in the title role (although the pilot failed to be picked up as a series). Regardless, Lemani retired from acting in 1969. One of her earliest film appearances came in the 1964 comedy A Global Affair, which also featured Nehemiah Persoff and fellow TOS guest actress Barbara Bouchet. She went on to appear in such films as Dead Heat on a Merry-Go-Round (in which she, Sabrina Scharf, Vic Tayback, and George D. Wallace appear unbilled, along with billed actors Michael Strong and Phillip Pine) and Gambit (with Roger C. Carmel, Arnold Moss, John Abbott and Vic Tayback) in 1966. She also had a supporting role in Joseph Sargent's 1968 drama To Hell with Heroes, along with William Marshall and Sid Haig, written by Harold Livingston. In total, she had roles in nearly twenty films.

Postponed Celebrities

Amy Hunter
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Amy Hunter played rookie 'Jamie Strickland' on "Pacific Blue" for it's final two seasons on USA. Not only was she a regular on the popular television series she also appeared in blockbuster films such as "The Scorpion King" starring Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson and "The Kingdom", starring opposite Academy Award Winner, Jamie Foxx. She also has appeared in the popular films "Two Can Play That Game" starring Morris Chestnut and "This Christmas" starring Idris Elba and Chris Brown.

Amy also has a love of comedy and appeared in several sitcoms including "The Fresh Prince Of Bel Air", "The Cosby Show", "The Wayans Brothers" and "The Parkers" to name a few. Amy also has many years of experience in modeling in New York, Los Angeles and Europe. She has also appeared in a number of television commercials, including Miller, Chevrolet, Head and Shoulders and Reebok. Along with her over twenty year acting experience, Amy has taken her love of story telling to paper and behind the scenes. Over the last eight years she has written several shorts, feature spec scripts, and has produced independent projects in the LA area. She currently runs her own independent film distribution company called Black Waterhorse Productions.

Barbara Baldavin
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Barbara Baldavin is an American television and movie actress.

Baldavin mainly performed in dramatic roles. In the 1960s she played a small recurring character in Star Trek as Angela Martine, most prominently featured in "Balance of Terror" and "Shore Leave". She appeared in season three's episode Turnabout Intruder as a different character, communications officer and court reporter, Lt. Lisa. In 1969 Barbara played Sally Fisher, a nurse and girlfriend of Pete Malloy (Martin Milner) in episode6 “A Sound Like Thunder” from season 2 of “Adam 12.” (In the 1970s she was a regular cast member in Medical Center as Nurse Holmby. In 1971 she appeared in Mannix, Season 5 Episode14 'To Save a Dead Man' as Mrs Kilgore (imposter).

Barbara Gates
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Barbara Gates is a former actress who played a 'Crewwoman' in the "Star Trek"TOS episode: "The Changeling".

One of her first on-screen appearances was in the Paramount film T"he Party Crashers" (1958) Her early television appearances included the "Al Jarvis Show", "Emergency Ward," "The Larry Finely Show", "77 Sunset Strip" (1960), "Surfside Six", and "Hawaiian Eye." She later appeared in "The Green Hornet "(1966, with Victoria George), "Dream Girl", "Felony Squad", "The Young Marrieds", and Divorce Court, all prior to her filming of "Star Trek". It was also during this time, she was Miss September of the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce, and as such, was frequently featured in many local Hollywood events. In December 1969, Gates joined actor Richard Deacon on a Hollywood Overseas Committee-USO handshake tour of military hospitals in Japan, Okinawa, Guam, the Philippines and Hawaii. Her later work included "McCloud" (1970), and played in the film "The Young Country" (1970), followed by several appearances on "Medical Center." (1974)

Beverly Washburn
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is an American actress who appeared as a young girl in NBC's The Loretta Young Show and as an older teenager in Loretta Young's 1962-1963 CBS family drama, The New Loretta Young Show. In between, Washburn was cast as Lisbeth Searcy in the 1957 Walt Disney film Old Yeller, the story of a beloved dog, starring Fess Parker, Dorothy McGuire, Tommy Kirk, Kevin Corcoran, and Jeff York, in the role of Lisbeth's father, Bud Searcy.

Washburn appeared once on NBC's Star Trek in the role of Lieutenant Arlene Galway in the 1967 episode "The Deadly Years". She appeared on many of the anthology series then common on American television networks, including The Ford Television Theatre, Lux Video Theatre, Jane Wyman's Fireside Theatre, Chevron Hall of Stars, H. J. Heinz Company's Studio 57, Four Star Playhouse, Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theater, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, The 20th Century Fox Hour, Alcoa Presents: One Step Beyond, Shirley Temple's Storybook, and General Electric Theater, hosted by Ronald W. Reagan. In 1951, Washburn appeared in the theatrical film Superman and the Mole Men, which was thereafter edited into two half-hour segments. These became the first two episodes of the television series The Adventures of Superman, starring George Reeves and Phyllis Coates. In 1951 she also appeared as an orphaned French girl in Frank Capra's film, "Here Comes the Groom", starring Bing Crosby, Franchot Tone, Alexis Smith,and Jane Wyman. In 1955, Washburn appeared as a daughter of Stephen Dunne and Barbara Billingsley in the nearly forgotten CBS sitcom Professional Father. Phyllis Coates appeared in that same series too as a nurse, Madge Allen. George Reeves also appeared with Washburn in one of her Ford Theatre episodes. Later, young Washburn appeared on Leave It to Beaver, a popular sitcom in which Billingsley played the mother, June Cleaver. Washburn's other roles included Jack Webb's Dragnet, The Lone Ranger, Fury, The Millionaire, The Law and Mr. Jones, and Target: The Corruptors!, a series about crusading journalists starring Stephen McNally and Robert Harland. She also portrayed the character Lolly Howard in the 1961 episode "Parasite Mansion" of Boris Karloff's NBC suspense series, Thriller. Washburn appeared on radio with popular comedian Jack Benny even before she guest starred on CBS's The Jack Benny Program on television. She appeared for a 26-week season as older daughter Vickie Massey in The New Loretta Young in which Young played the widowed mother of seven who earns her living as a magazine writer in Connecticut. Washburn's other co-stars included James Philbrook, Dirk Rambo, Dack Rambo, Carol Sydes, and Sandy Descher. She also appeared in episodes of the Warner Bros. ABC detective series, 77 Sunset Strip and Hawaiian Eye. She appeared twice on the CBS western series, The Texan starring Rory Calhoun, as Henrietta Tovers in "No Tears for the Dead" (1958) and as Greta Banden in "Badman" (1960). She appeared in the debut episode of NBC's Wagon Train but not in the lead role. Her episodes included the episodes "The Willy Moran Story" (1957), "The Tobias Jones Story" (1958), and as Milly Sharp "The Cassie Vance Story" (1963). In "Tobias Jones", her co-star was comedian Lou Costello, in his first dramatic role. Washburn's other roles included two appearances on Arrest and Trial and Gidget and single guest-starring roles on The Patty Duke Show and Mr. Novak (in the episode "Visions of Sugar Plums"). Into the 1970s, she appeared in three episodes of Karl Malden's The Streets of San Francisco crime drama: "Most Feared in the Jungle" (1973), "Letters from the Grave" (1975), and as Michelle Rhodes in "Let's Pretend We're Strangers" (1977). One of her later television appearances was in the 1984 episode "Remembrance of Things Past" of CBS's Scarecrow and Mrs. King. Her most recent role was that of the character Brenda in the 2007 film Hard Four, which also features Ed Asner, Paula Prentiss, Dabney Coleman, and Ed Begley, Jr.

Catherine Hicks
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Catherine Hicks is an American actress. She is best known for her role as Annie Camden on the long-running television series 7th Heaven. Other notable roles include Dr. Faith Coleridge on the soap opera Ryan's Hope (1976–1978), her Emmy Award-nominated performance as Marilyn Monroe in Marilyn: The Untold Story (1980), Dr. Gillian Taylor in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986), and Karen Barclay in Child's Play (1988).

In 1980, Hicks beat out hundreds of actresses for the lead role of Marilyn Monroe in ABC's $3.5 million production, Marilyn: The Untold Story, based on the Norman Mailer best seller She earned an Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie for her portrayal of the legendary star. In 1981, Hicks starred in CBS's remake of Jacqueline Susann's Valley of the Dolls, as Anne Wells, an entertainment lawyer, and James Coburn's protege. She turned down a co-starring role in Body Heat due to the overtly sexual nature of the film. She made her feature-film debut in the thriller Death Valley (1982) as Peter Billingsley's mother, Sally. That same year, she starred as Sable in Better Late Than Never. Hicks took the lead role as Amanda Tucker in the 12-episode detective series Tucker's Witch opposite Tim Matheson as Rick Tucker. The program aired on CBS from October 6, 1982, sporadically into August, 1983. In 1983, she played Lisa Sage and co-starred with John Schneider in CBS's romantic comedy movie Happy Endings. Hicks appeared with Anne Bancroft and Ron Silver in Sidney Lumet's film Garbo Talks (1984). Hicks also played Bill Murray's socialite fiancée, Isabel, in the remake The Razor's Edge (1984). For her work in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986), Hicks received a Saturn Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress.[citation needed] That same year, she played Carol Heath in Francis Ford Coppola's Peggy Sue Got Married. In Like Father Like Son (1987), Hicks played Dr. Amy Larkin. In March 1987, Hicks hosted the 59th Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Scientific and Technical Awards ceremony. In 1988, she played businesswoman Ella Frazier in the Yugoslavian comedy Tajna manastirske rakije (also released under the titles Cognac and Secret Ingredient).[citation needed] She co-starred with Christopher Plummer, as his estranged daughter, Tina Boyer, in Showtime's Souvenir (1989). She played Karen Barclay in the horror film Child's Play (1988). Her performance won her a 1988 Best Actress Saturn Award. In 1989, she starred opposite Tony Danza in She's Out of Control as his girlfriend, Janet Pearson. In 1991, she co-starred in the Fox TV comedy-fantasy movie Hi Honey - I'm Dead as Carol Stadler. She played Allison Ploutzer in the Jeff Franklin ABC comedy pilot Up to No Good (1992). She starred with John Bedford Lloyd in the ABC comedy pilot The Circle Game (1993) as the mother, and schoolteacher, Nancy She played Jeannie Barker in the Aaron Spelling primetime soap opera Winnetka Road which had a six-episode tryout on NBC in 1994 That same year, she played the wife in the pilot for The Martin Short Show. Going into production, after the concept of the character was changed, she was replaced by Jan Hooks. She played Julia Riordan, opposite John Lithgow and Lea Salonga, in the ABC Hallmark Hall of Fame movie Redwood Curtain (1995)In 1996, she was cast as Annie Camden on The WB's family drama 7th Heaven, and she portrayed the role until the series ended, after 11 seasons, in 2007. In 1997, Hicks played flight attendant Maggie in Turbulence. The same year, Hicks played next door neighbor, Ms. Lewis, in Michael Davis' coming-of-age film, Eight Days a Week.

Charles Martinet
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Charles Martinet is an American actor and voice actor known for his portrayal of Mario in the Super Mario video game series since 1992. He has also voiced related characters such as Luigi, Wario, and Waluigi.

Working for Nintendo since 1990, Martinet started voicing Mario at video game trade shows in which attendees would walk up to a TV screen displaying a 3-D Mario head that moved around the screen and talked This system was called Mario in Real-Time or MIRT and was developed by Pasadena based SimGraphics. Martinet could see the attendees by means of a hidden camera setup, and a facial motion capture rig recorded his mouth movements in order to synchronize Martinet's mouth movement with the on-screen Mario mouth movement. This digital puppetry, with Martinet's comic performance, was a novelty at the time. Martinet earned the job when, one day, he was told by his friend that there was going to be an audition at a trade show in which auditioneers "talk to people as a plumber". He went to the audition at the last minute as the casting directors were already putting away their equipment. Charles Martinet walked in and asked, "Can I please read for this?". The directors let him audition and told him, "You're an Italian plumber from Brooklyn". At first Martinet planned to talk like a stereotypical Italian American with a deep, raspy voice (which is how Mario sounded in the Super Mario Bros. Super Show, The Adventures of Super Mario Bros. 3 and Super Mario World cartoons). He then thought to himself that it would be too harsh for children to hear, so he made it more soft-hearted and friendly, resulting in what Mario's voice is today. Martinet has also stated that he kept on talking with his Mario voice until the audition tape ran out He says that Petruchio from William Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew was an inspiration for his portrayal of Mario. Martinet's video game voiceover debut was as Mario in the 1995 Windows release of Interplay's game Mario's FUNdamentals. However, most were first exposed to Mario's voice in the landmark 1996 game Super Mario 64. During the recording session, he and a few developers wondered what Mario would do when the player leaves him alone. In the end, Martinet came up with the idea that Mario would dream of pasta during his sleep, and in the final game, Mario says "night nighty. Ahhh spaghetti, ahhh ravioli, ahhh mamma mia" when in his second sleeping position. Following Super Mario 64, he would go on to additionally voice Luigi, Wario, Waluigi, Metal Mario, Shadow Mario, Mini-Mario Toys, Baby Mario, Baby Luigi and Baby Wario in most games wherein these characters speak. He also voiced the enemies Wart, Mouser, Tryclyde, and Clawgrip in Super Mario Advance. His voice work appears in the English and Japanese language versions of the games. With his work as Mario in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, the Guinness Book of World Records recognized Martinet for having performed the same character in one hundred different titles, the most of any video game voice actor. In addition to video game voiceovers, Martinet has worked as a voice actor in commercials, cartoons, and promotions. At the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) trade show in 2005, Martinet remotely interacted with players from his New York apartment in a playable demo of Animal Crossing: Wild World Martinet did Mario's voice as the announcer for Pac-Man Vs. on the Nintendo GameCube.Martinet provided voiceover acting for the boxers and the announcer in the Super NES title Super Punch-Out!!. He voiced the character Vigoro in Sega's Dreamcast and Nintendo GameCube role-playing video game, Skies of Arcadia. He did the voice of Homunculus in the Konami PlayStation 2, Xbox and Windows game Shadow of Destiny, and provided voices for Reader Rabbit and The ClueFinders games. In 2009, Martinet told That Gaming Site that he wanted to voice Link in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, but . Other than the Mario series, Martinet has also done work for the video game Cel Damage as the voice of Fowl Mouth, as well as the primary voice work in several educational game series such as LeapFrog. He also voiced the dragon Paarthurnax in the 2011 video game The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, Orvus in 2009's Ratchet & Clank Future: A Crack in Time, and narrated the cutscenes and menus for the 2013 video game Runner2 and Runner3, appearing as a hidden playable character in the latter. Martinet also narrated for the 2020 Netflix docuseries High Score.

Charlie Brill
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Charlie Brill is an American actor and voice artist. Brill's first motion picture was The Beast of Budapest. He appeared in Blackbeard's Ghost and The Amazing Dobermans. He played Klingon spy Arne Darvin in the Star Trek episode "The Trouble with Tribbles" (1967) and reprised the role nearly 30 years later in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "Trials and Tribble-ations" (1996). He and his wife Mitzi McCall played Capt. Harry Lipschitz and Mrs. Lipschitz on the long-running series Silk Stalkings.

Brill and McCall performed sketch comedy on The Ed Sullivan Show on the same episode as the Beatles' first appearance on February 9, 1964. They were interviewed in 2005 for the "Big Break" episode of PRI radio program This American Life regarding their Beatles-Sullivan experience, including a dressing room encounter with John Lennon. In 1968–1969, Brill and McCall appeared on Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In, but only as the violently bickering couple in "The Fun Couple" sketches. Brill was a frequent panelist on the 1970s revival of Match Game, and, along with McCall the celebrity-couples game show Tattletales

Cindy Pickett
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Cindy Pickett is an American actress. She is known for her 1970s role as Jackie Marler-Spaulding on the CBS soap Guiding Light and Dr. Carol Novino on the television drama St. Elsewhere in the 1980s.Pickett, however, is best known to audiences for her lighter turn as Katie Bueller, Ferris Bueller's loving and unsuspecting mother, in the 1986 American comedy movie Ferris Bueller's Day Off.

Other notable cinematic roles and performances include Valerie St. John in Roger Vadim's 1980 film, Jeux de Nuit / Night Games, for which she would have the leading role, and as the tough-as-nails and heroic Dr. Diane Norris in the 1989 sci-fi-horror film DeepStar Six. Pickett made a major departure from her soap opera image when she played the central role in the 1980 erotic film Jeux de Nuit / Night Games, directed by Roger Vadim. It was a sexually charged role involving numerous nude scenes, however the film went unnoticed and did not boost Pickett's career. In the 1981 mystery/crime drama Margin for Murder, Pickett played the role of Velda, Mike Hammer's (Kevin Dobson) loyal and devoted secretary. She played "Jackie Marler" on the soap opera The Guiding Light from 1976 to 1980 "Vanessa Sarnac" on the ABC weekly TV series Call to Glory from 1984 to 1985, and she appeared as Dr. Carol Novino on the hospital drama TV series St. Elsewhere from 1986 to 1988. Pickett had a supporting role in the 1987 mini-series Amerika, which she then considered to be her "best part and the best showcase" she ever had. In 1991 she played the part of Addy Mathewson in the TV movie/pilot Plymouth, which at the time was considered to be one of the most expensive such movies ever made. Pickett portrayed the real-life Kay Stayner, the mother of a boy who was kidnapped for several years, in the dramatic TV movie I Know My First Name Is Steven. TV series she has guest-starred on include Riptide, Simon & Simon, Magnum, P.I., L.A. Law, Murder, She Wrote, The Pretender, NYPD Blue, CSI: Miami, Without a Trace, Crossing Jordan and Burn Notice

David Frankham
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David Frankham was born on February 16, 1926 in Kent, England. He is an actor, known for One Hundred and One Dalmatians (1961), Star Trek: The Original Series (1966) and Master of the World (1961).

In 1955, Frankham moved to Hollywood to pursue a career as an actor. He soon found work, appearing on five episodes of the live television programme Matinee Theatre. He worked steadily in television, as well as appearing in films such as Return of the Fly (1959), Ten Who Dared (1960), Master of the World (1961), Tales of Terror (1962), The Spiral Road (1962), King Rat (1965), and The Great Santini (1979). Frankham provided the voice of Sergeant Tibbs the cat in Walt Disney's One Hundred and One Dalmatians (1961). He appeared in guest roles on American television from the late 1950s to the 1980s. His career peaked in the 1960s with frequent roles on such shows as Thriller, GE True, Twelve O'Clock High, The F.B.I., Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., The Beverly Hillbillies, The Outer Limits, Star Trek (episode "Is There in Truth No Beauty?"), then in Cannon, The Waltons, and McCloud during the 1970s. In November 2012, Frankham's autobiography Which One Was David? was published by BearManor Media.

Ernest Harden, Jr.
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Ernest Harden, Jr. (born November 25, 1952) played the part of Marcus Henderson in Seasons 3 and 4 of The Jeffersons. Marcus, who has appeared in such TV series as The Steve Harvey Show, Hill Street Blues, The Parkers and The Bernie Mac Show, also appeared in the films The Atlanta Child Murders (1985), Born In East L.A. (1987), White Men Can't Jump (1992), and An American Carol in 2008. His first film appearance was a bit part as a teen in the 1975 film Three Days At The Condor.

Ernest Harden, Jr. (born November 25, 1952) played the part of Marcus Henderson in Seasons 3 and 4 of The Jeffersons. Marcus, who has appeared in such TV series as The Steve Harvey Show, Hill Street Blues, The Parkers and The Bernie Mac Show, also appeared in the films The Atlanta Child Murders (1985), Born In East L.A. (1987), White Men Can't Jump (1992), and An American Carol in 2008. His first film appearance was a bit part as a teen in the 1975 film Three Days At The Condor.

George Chakiris
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George Chakiris is an American actor. He is best known for his appearance in the 1961 film version of West Side Story as Bernardo, the leader of the Sharks gang, for which he won both the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor and the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture.

Chakiris made his film debut in 1947 in the chorus of Song of Love. For several years he appeared in small roles, usually as a dancer or a member of the chorus in various musical films, including The Great Caruso (1951), Stars and Stripes Forever (1952), Call Me Madam (1953), Second Chance (1953) and The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T. (1953). He was one of the dancers in Marilyn Monroe's "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend" number in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953), and he was in Give a Girl a Break (1953) and White Christmas (1954). He can be seen in the funeral dance in the MGM musical film Brigadoon (1954) and was in There's No Business Like Show Business (1954). Chakiris appeared as a dancer in White Christmas (1954). A publicity photo of Chakiris with Rosemary Clooney from her scene with "Love, You Didn't Do Right by Me" generated fan mail, and Paramount signed him to a movie contract. "I got lucky with the close-up with Rosemary," said Chakiris Chakiris was in The Country Girl (1954) and The Girl Rush (1955), dancing with Rosalind Russell in the latter. He received a positive notice from Hedda Hopper. MGM borrowed him for Meet Me in Las Vegas (1956), and he danced in Las Vegas. Chakiris had a small non-dancing part in Under Fire (1957). Frustrated with the progress of his career, Chakiris left Hollywood for New York. West Side Story had been running for a year on Broadway, and Chakiris auditioned for Jerome Robbins. He was cast in the London production as Riff, leader of the Jets. The musical launched on the West End in late 1958, and Chakiris received excellent reviews, playing it for almost 22 months. The Mirisch Brothers bought the film rights to West Side Story and tested Chakiris. They ended up feeling his dark complexion made him more ideal for the role of Bernardo, leader of the Sharks, and cast Russ Tamblyn as Riff. Filming took seven months. The film of West Side Story (1961) was hugely successful, and Chakiris won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance. This led to a long-term contract with the Mirisch Company. Chakiris played the lead role in Two and Two Make Six (1962), directed by Freddie Francis. He starred as a doctor in the film Diamond Head (1963) opposite Charlton Heston and Yvette Mimieux, which was popular. In the early 1960s, he embarked on a career as a pop singer, resulting in a couple of minor hit songs. In 1960, he recorded one single with noted producer Joe Meek. Chakiris' fee around this time was a reported $100,000 per movie His first new film for the Mirishes was Flight from Ashiya (1964), shot in Japan with Yul Brynner and Richard Widmark. The Mirisches reunited Chakiris with Brynner in Kings of the Sun (1963), an epic about the Mayans which was a box-office flop. Chakiris went to Italy to make Bebo's Girl (1964) with Claudia Cardinale. He did 633 Squadron (1964), a popular war movie with Cliff Robertson, the last movie he made for the Mirisches. Chakiris later said he made a mistake with his Hollywood films by looking at the "potential" of them instead of the quality of the roles Chakiris played a Greek terrorist in Cyprus in a British film The High Bright Sun (1965) with Dirk Bogarde. He went to Italy for The Mona Lisa Has Been Stolen (1965) and France for Is Paris Burning? (1966). He acted with Catherine Deneuve and Gene Kelly in Jacques Demy's French musical Les Demoiselles de Rochefort (1967). Around this time, his manager cancelled his contract with Capitol Records. However he enjoyed his time in Europe, saying he had time to "experiment and refine my craft." He also did a nightclub act at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, his first stage work since West Side Story. The show was successful and led to Chakiris receiving an offer to appear with Jose Ferrer in a TV production of Kismet (1967). He did The Day the Hot Line Got Hot (1968) in France and The Big Cube (1969) with Lana Turner in America. He made Sharon vestida de rojo (1970) in Spain. In 1969, Chakiris did a stage production of The Corn Is Green in Chicago with Eileen Herlie. He enjoyed the experience and it revived his confidence as an actor. He said all the films he made after West Side Story had been "a waste of time...it was difficult to take them seriously...It was my fault and no one else's". Chakiris accepted a dramatic role on Medical Center to change his image. He starred in the first national tour of the Stephen Sondheim musical Company, touring as Bobby in 1971-1972. Chakiris worked heavily on TV in the 1970s and 1980s in Britain and America, guest-starring on Hawaii Five-O, Police Surgeon, Thriller, Notorious Woman, Wonder Woman, Fantasy Island, CHiPs, Matt Houston, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Poor Little Rich Girls, Hell Town and Murder, She Wrote. He appeared in the final episode of The Partridge Family as an old high school boyfriend to Shirley Partridge (Shirley Jones). Their kiss goodbye was the final scene in the program's run. He also starred in the Terry Marcel film Why Not Stay for Breakfast? (1979). Chakiris appeared in several episodes of Dallas and had a role on Santa Barbara. Chakiris had a recurring role on the TV show Superboy as Professor Peterson during the first two seasons from 1988 to 1990. He was top-billed in the film Pale Blood (1990) and guest-starred on Human Target and The Girls of Lido. He played The King and I on stage in 1995 in Los Angeles. Chakiris' last role to date was in a 1996 episode of the British sitcom Last of the Summer Wine.

Harry Hamlin
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is an American actor, author, and entrepreneur. Hamlin is known for his roles as Perseus in the 1981 fantasy film Clash of the Titans and as Michael Kuzak in the legal drama series L.A. Law, for which he received two Golden Globe nominations. For his recurring role on the AMC drama series Mad Men, Hamlin received a Primetime Emmy nomination for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series.

Hamlin appeared in the 1976 television production of Taming of the Shrew and also had the title role in the 1979 television miniseries Studs Lonigan. He starred in Movie Movie with George C. Scott in 1978, for which he received his first Golden Globe Award nomination. His big-screen break was a starring role in the 1981 Greek mythology fantasy epic Clash of the Titans. Afterwards, his career faltered somewhat with such controversial films as Making Love in 1982 (the first gay themed love story to be produced by a major studio, Twentieth Century Fox) and Blue Skies Again (1983). He returned to television appearing in the miniseries Master of the Game (based on the novel by Sidney Sheldon) in 1984 and Space (based on the novel by James A. Michener) in 1985. Hamlin appeared on the NBC legal drama series L.A. Law, playing attorney Michael Kuzak. He remained on the series from 1986 to 1991, during which time he was voted People magazine's "Sexiest Man Alive" in 1987. Hamlin left the series at the end of the fifth season having been nominated twice for Best Actor in a television series by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association In early 1991, Hamlin appeared in the music video and sang in the choir on the song "Voices That Care", which was made in support of U.S. troops who were stationed in the Middle East and involved at that time in Operation Desert Storm. He then appeared in two 1992 episodes of Batman: The Animated Series, in each episode as a separate character. In the episode "Joker's Wild", Hamlin played the role of Cameron Kaiser, a ruthless businessman who sinks all his money into a casino, then counts on the Joker to destroy it in order to collect on the insurance policy from a reputable company, and in the other episode, "Moon of the Wolf", he provided the voice of Anthony Romulus, a greedy athlete who takes a potion to enhance his skills, only to realize too late that it has transformed him into a werewolf. In 1995, he participated in the documentary film, The Celluloid Closet where he discussed his role in the film Making Love. In 2001, he starred in the television comedy Bratty Babies, and in 2002 he reprised the role of Michael Kuzak in an L.A. Law reunion television movie. In 2004, Hamlin began a recurring role on the television series Veronica Mars.He played fading action hero Aaron Echolls, father to central show character Logan Echolls who had a turbulent relationship with him. Hamlin's character states that he (like the real-life Hamlin) was People magazine's 'Sexiest Man Alive' in 1987. Aaron's wife, Lynn, was played by Hamlin's real-life wife, Lisa Rinna. Hamlin appeared beginning in the sixth episode of the first season, "Return of the Kane", and made his last appearance in the second season finale, "Not Pictured". In 2006, Hamlin took part in the third season of Dancing with the Stars with Ashly DelGrosso, but was voted off the show in the third week. In 2009, Hamlin starred in the series Harper's Island as Uncle Marty. He was killed abruptly in the first episode by being cut in half while he dangled from a broken wooden bridge. In June 2010, Hamlin guest-starred in an episode of Army Wives and then became a recurring cast member. On December 4, 2008, TV Guide reported that Hamlin and Rinna signed a deal to create a reality television series called Harry Loves Lisa that is based around their family life. The series was developed by TV Land and premiered on October 6, 2010. In 2012, Hamlin began playing Lloyd Lishman, an older lover to Ian Gallagher (Cameron Monaghan) on the U.S version of Shameless (7 episodes circa the end of Season 3). Hamlin appeared in an adult diaper commercial with his wife during a primetime television program. Beginning on April 28, 2013, Hamlin appeared in several episodes of season six (1968) of Mad Men as ad executive Jim Cutler after the merger of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce and Cutler Gleason and Chaough. Hamlin was nominated for a 2013Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series for his appearance in "A Tale of Two Cities." In 2016, Hamlin was cast in the EPIX comedy Graves] starring Nick Nolte, and in 2017, Hamlin was cast as Addison Hayes, a mysterious and powerful mastermind whose agenda will collide with Swagger in the new USA Network show Shooter

James Daris
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James Daris played the role of "Creature" in the "Star Trek": TOS episode: "Spock's Brain". He also made appearances in "I Spy", "I Dream of Jeannie", "Land of the Giants", "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." and "Mission: Impossible".

James Daris played the role of "Creature" in the "Star Trek": TOS episode: "Spock's Brain". He also made appearances in "I Spy", "I Dream of Jeannie", "Land of the Giants", "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." and "Mission: Impossible".

Jeremy Miller
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an American actor and singer best known for his portrayal of Ben Seaver on Growing Pains and its two reunion movies. He also voiced Linus van Pelt in Happy New Year, Charlie Brown along with Chad Allen.

Miller was cast in a few commercials, then a 1984 guest role in Punky Brewster before landing the role of Ben Seaver, the youngest son on Growing Pains. Miller was supposed to be a part of the cast of the PBS show Ghostwriter. The creator wanted to make him a mentor to the younger Ghostwriter members, but the producers decided it wasn't a good idea for the show to have an older ghostwriter team member and Miller was not invited back after shooting the pilot. Since there was room for one more character in the show's budget he was replaced by Todd Alexander's character Rob. As an actor, probably his most recognizable trademark is the "Ben Seaver Scream", which can be heard and seen in any number of Growing Pains episodes and during the closing credits of the movie Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star.

Jill Whelan
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Jill Whelan is an American actress. She played Vicki Stubing, the daughter of Captain Stubing in the hit television series The Love Boat. An M&M commercial] got her noticed by producers and cast her in Friends (1979) which was rapidly cancelled. Concurrently, at the age of 11, she was cast as Vicki, Captain Stubing's daughter, initially as a guest star but later making regular appearances

As well as starring in The Love Boat, Whelan made numerous guest appearances in TV shows including Fantasy Island (twice), Vegas, Trapper John, M.D., Matt Houston and Battle of the Network Stars. In late 1979, she played the role of Lisa Davis, a heart patient, in Airplane! In the mid-1980s, in Los Angeles, having returned from England and with The Love Boat series coming to an end, Whelan moved to New York City and worked as an event producer at Madison Square Garden where she helped set-up acts. In 1999, Whelan left acting and started working as an investigative producer at the Los Angeles television station KCOP and continued as a radio show host for 1210 WPHT radio. On November 25, 2001, Whelan appeared on an episode of The Weakest Link, a trivia game show hosted by Anne Robinson. Whelan competed against other celebrity TV stars, including Mackenzie Phillips, Nell Carter, Cindy Williams, Joan Van Ark, Erin Moran, Erik Estrada, and Fred "Re-run" Berry. She outlasted the others, winning $57,000 for her charity. On September 10, 2008, Whelan appeared with several other cast members from the movie Airplane! in a reunion segment on NBC's the Today Show. In October 2008, Whelan made her New York City cabaret debut with her one-woman show Jill Whelan: An Evening in Dry Dock at The Metropolitan Room. From September to November 2011, Whelan appeared in the British farce Move Over Mrs. Markham at Stage West Theatre Restaurant in the Toronto, Ontario, area. Whelan was set to replace Mark Thompson, who retired on August 17, 2012, after 25 years co-hosting The Mark & Brian Show on KLOS in Los Angeles, but during Thompson's final broadcast, co-host Brian Phelps announced that he, too, was quitting KLOS. In 2013, Jill moved on as co-host with Brian Phelps in The Brian and Jill Show. Whelan and Phelps share a love for improvisational comedy, and have created hundreds of characters together that they have performed both on the stage during improvisation shows and in sketches performed on their podcast. She is mentioned in "Dead Man Sliding", the tenth episode of the third season of Sliders, as an actress who never had relevance in the dimension of the protagonists.

Joanna Miles
First Appearance Ever!
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Joanna Miles is the actress who portrayed 'Perrin', wife of 'Sarek', in the "Star Trek: The Next Generation" episodes "Sarek" and "Unification I".

As a science fiction fan, Miles is familiar with "Star Trek" TOS and cites "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home" as her favorite, "Particulary Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. Leonard Nimoy has made a wonderful marriage between entertaining us and having us address issues that we need to face, and what better way to do it than through this medium?" Born in Nice, France, her first professional acting work was the play "Goodbye My Fancy" for which she received her Actor's Equity card. Miles had her motion picture debut with a minor part in the 1960 drama "Butterfield 8" on which she also worked as stand-in for Elizabeth Taylor and Susan Oliver. Following her film debut, Miles appeared in recurring roles in the television series "The Nurses" (1963), "The Edge of Night" (1964-1965), "A Flame in the Wind" (1964), "The Secret Storm" (1967-1968), and "All My Children" (1970-1971). She also worked on the television drama "The Glass Menagerie" (1973) which earned her two Emmy Awards as Best Supporting Actress in Drama and Best Supporting Actress of the Year, the television drama "Born Innocent" (1974), the science fiction horror film "Bug (1975), and the science fiction thriller "The Ultimate Warrior(1975, with Yul Brynner) before she worked with William Shatner in the "Barbary Coast" episode "Crazy Cats" (1975). Joanna had guest roles in episodes of "Petrocelli" (1976), "The Incredible Hulk" (1979,), "Trapper John, M.D." (1982), "Cagney & Lacey" (1986), "St. Elsewhere" (1987) and portrayed the recurring role of 'Martha Randolph' in 4 episodes of "Dallas" (1984). Further film work includes the television drama "Delta County, U.S.A." (1977), the television science fiction film "A Fire in the Sky" (1978), the horror film The Orphan (1979), "Cross Creek" (1983), "Blackout" (1988), and an acclaimed performance as 'Queen Gertrude', mother of 'Hamlet', in the drama "Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead" (1990). In the 1990s, Miles appeared in several television movies and had supporting roles in the thriller Above Suspicion (1995) and the science fiction thriller Judge Dredd (1995). She guest starred in episodes of "Chicago Hope" (1998 and 2000). Joanna worked on "ER" (2000), Whoopi Goldberg's "Strong Medicine" (2001), and Judging Amy (2002). As a lifetime member of the Actors Studio and the Motion Picture Academy, Miles continues to work on stage in plays such as "Women in Shorts" (2011) and "There Is No They" (2012). Joanna continues to work in film, television and stage.

Karl Held
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Karl Held is the actor who played 'Lindstrom' in the "Star Trek" TOS episode "The Return of the Archons". He was born as Carl Held in Jersey City, New Jersey, and is also known as Karl Held. Held was married to fellow Star Trek guest star Sarah Marshall from July 20, 1964 until her death on January 18, 2014. He visited the set in August 1967 during filming of "The Deadly Years", in which Marshall guest starred.

Karl has appeared in over fifty films and television shows in a career spanning three decades. In the early 1960s, he had a brief recurring role on the long-running series "Perry Mason", playing the title attorney's assistant, 'David Gideon'. He later starred in the 1970s British television series "The Lotus Eaters". From 1986 through 1989, Held portrayed the role of 'Garth' on the primetime soap opera Falcon Crest. In addition to his regular and recurring roles, Held had guest spots on such series as "77 Sunset Strip" (with Bill Quinn), "The Outer Limits" (with Martin Landau), "The F.B.I." (with Stephen Brooks and Paul Fix), Cimarron Strip (with Paul Carr), "The Invaders" (with Lawrence Montaigne and Alfred Ryder), "Thriller" (with Kim Darby), "Space: 1999" (starring Martin Landau and Nick Tate), "Charlie's Angels" (directed by Cliff Bole), Riptide (with Ray Wise), "Santa Barbara" (with Nicholas Coster and Louise Sorel), and "Scarecrow and Mrs. King" (with Vince Howard and Gary Lockwood). His was in the infamous "Good to the Last Drop" episode of "L.A. Law" in 1991. This episode featured the death of Diana Muldaur's character after falling down an elevator shaft. It also featured series regular Corbin Bernsen as well as Daniel Benzali, Roy Brocksmith, Lawrence Dobkin, and Robert Walker. Held has been featured in a number of feature films, as well, with uncredited roles in 1961's "The Outsider" (co-starring Stanley Adams and Paul Comi), the 1967 Disney comedy "The Gnome-Mobile", and the 1971 James Bond film "Diamonds Are Forever" (also featuring Sid Haig and Marc Lawrence). He also had credited supporting roles in the 1965 thriller "36 Hours" (co-starring James Doohan, Roy Jenson, and Celia Lovsky) and the 1965 Disney comedy "That Darn Cat!" (with Frank Gorshin).

Kim Coles
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Kim Coles is an American actress, comedian and game show host. Coles is known for her roles as a cast member on In Living Color for the first season (1990-1991) and as Synclaire James-Jones on television sitcom Living Single (1993–1998), which both originally aired on Fox. She was the host of BET's game show Pay It Off in 2009.

Coles has appeared on many television shows, including Frasier ("Dr." Mary Thomas), Six Feet Under, Celebrity Mole, Living Single and The Geena Davis Show. Early in her career, she appeared as one of the hosts of It's Showtime at the Apollo. She was an original cast member on the sketch comedy series In Living Color that appeared on the FOX network. After leaving "In Living Color", she then got the role as Synclaire James on Living Single and won an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series. She appeared as the mother of Spirit on UPN's One on One. Coles is a published author; her book is called I'm Free But It Will Cost You, ISBN 978-0-7868-8322-6, Hyperion Books, 1998. Coles appeared on Celebrity Mole: Hawaii and was the first contestant to be eliminated. At the reunion of the show, she was one of two celebrities (the other was Michael Boatman) to correctly guess that Frederique van der Wal was the series' saboteur, Kathy Griffin was the winner, and Erik von Detten was the runner-up. Coles was a regular panelist on the 2000 revival of To Tell the Truth during its second season. She was also featured as a guest host on two episodes of The View. Coles was a co-host of the syndicated daytime television show In The Loop With iVillage alongside The Apprentice winner Bill Rancic and fellow season one contestant Ereka Vetrini. She has recently joined the cast of 10 Items or Less on TBS. On September 30, 2009, she hosted the game show Pay It Off, lasted for one season on BET, which is similar to Debt. In 2010, she appeared on RuPaul's Drag Race. She appeared in an episode of TV One's series "Life After" in late 2011.

Louise Fletcher
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Estelle Louise Fletcher (born July 22, 1934) is an American actress, best known for her portrayal of Nurse Ratched in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975), which earned her an Academy Award, a BAFTA Award and a Golden Globe Award. She is also well-known for her recurring role as the Bajoran religious leader Kai Winn Adami in the television series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993–99). She was nominated for Emmy Awards for her guest starring roles in the television series Picket Fences (1996) and Joan of Arcadia (2004).

Fletcher began appearing in several television series including Lawman (1958) and Maverick (1959). (The Maverick episode, "The Saga of Waco Williams" with James Garner, was the series' highest-rated episode.)[citation needed] Also in 1959, she appeared in the second episode of the original Untouchables TV series, (starring Robert Stack), "Ma Barker and Her Boys" as Elouise Fletcher recalled having greater success being cast in Westerns due to her height: "I was 5 feet 10 inches (1.78 m) tall, and no television producer thought a tall woman could be sexually attractive to anybody. I was able to get jobs on westerns because the actors were even taller than I was." In 1960, Fletcher made two guest appearances on Perry Mason, as defendant Gladys Doyle in "The Case of the Mythical Monkeys," and Susan Connolly in "The Case of the Larcenous Lady". In the summer of 1960, she was cast as Roberta McConnell in the episode "The Bounty Hunter" of Tate, starring David McLean. In 1974, she returned to film in Thieves Like Us, co-produced by her husband and Robert Altman, who also directed. When the two had a falling out on Altman's next project (Nashville (1975)), Altman decided to cast Lily Tomlin for the role of Linnea Reese, initially created for and by Fletcher. Meanwhile, director Miloš Forman saw Fletcher in Thieves and cast her as McMurphy's nemesis Nurse Ratched in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975).[2] Fletcher gained international recognition and fame for the role, winning the Academy Award for Best Actress, as well as a BAFTA Award and Golden Globe. She was only the third actress ever to win an Academy Award, BAFTA Award and Golden Globe Award for a single performance, after Audrey Hepburn and Liza Minnelli. When Fletcher accepted her Oscar, she used sign language to thank her parents. After Cuckoo's Nest, Fletcher had mixed success in film. She made several financially and critically successful films, while others were box-office failures. Fletcher's film roles were in such features as Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977), The Cheap Detective (1978), The Lady in Red (1979), The Magician of Lublin (1979), Brainstorm (1983), Firestarter (1984), Invaders From Mars (1986), Flowers in the Attic (1987), Two Moon Junction (1988), Best of the Best (1989), Blue Steel (1990), Virtuosity (1995), High School High (1996), and Cruel Intentions (1999, as Sebastian's aunt). Additionally, she played the character Ruth Shorter, a supporting role, in Aurora Borealis (2005), alongside Joshua Jackson and Donald Sutherland, and appeared in the Fox Faith film The Last Sin Eater (2007). Fletcher co-starred in TV movies such as The Karen Carpenter Story (1989) (as Karen and Richard Carpenter's mother, Agnes), Nightmare on the 13th Floor (1990), The Haunting of Seacliff Inn (1994), and The Stepford Husbands (1996). From 1993 to 1999, she held a recurring role in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine as the scheming Bajoran religious leader Kai Winn Adami. She also earned Emmy Award nominations for her guest roles on Picket Fences (1996), and later on Joan of Arcadia (2004). In 2009, Fletcher appeared in Heroes as the physician mother of character Emma Coolidge. In 2011, she appeared in Shameless as Grammy Gallagher, Frank Gallagher's foul-mouthed and hard-living mother who is serving a prison sentence for manslaughter related to a meth lab explosion. She portrayed the recurring role of Rosie on the series Girlboss (2017).

Marla Gibbs
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Marla Gibbs ( is an American actress, singer, comedian, writer and television producer, whose career spans five decades. Gibbs is known for her role as George Jefferson's maid, Florence Johnston, in the CBS sitcom, The Jeffersons (1975–1985), for which she received five nominations for Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series.

Gibbs also starred in the show's spin-off Checking In (1981) and the NBC sitcom, 227 (1985–1990); Gibbs co-produced the latter series, played the lead role of Mary Jenkins, and sang the theme song. Gibbs has won seven NAACP Image Awards. In later years, Gibbs played supporting roles in films The Meteor Man (1993), Lost & Found (1999), The Visit (2000), The Brothers (2001), Madea's Witness Protection (2012), Grantham & Rose (2015), and Lemon (2017) and the TV show Station 19 (2018). In August 2021, Gibbs began a run as Olivia Price on the NBC daytime drama, Days Of Our Lives. Gibbs got her first acting job in the early 1970s, in the blaxploitation films Sweet Jesus, Preacher Man and Black Belt Jones. In 1975, she was cast as Florence Johnston, the family's maid, in the CBS comedy series The Jeffersons. For her performance on the series, Gibbs was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series five times, and once for a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film. In 1981, she starred in the short-lived spin-off of The Jeffersons, titled Checking In.[2] Gibbs responded in a 2015 interview on Broadway Showbiz, when asked if she'd based any of her characters on real-life people: "Yes, Florence was like my aunt and grandmother so I lived it. She came easy to me so I'm like Florence in giving smart answers, but I was also shy so I wouldn't have dared to say some of the things Florence said. I prefer to do whatever I can do at the moment. Whoever's hiring me at the moment...that's what I'm supposed to do. My favorite is drama. I'm doing that now (on Scandal), but also still doing comedy on Hot in Cleveland."In 1985, when The Jeffersons was cancelled after 11 seasons, Gibbs was the lead actress in the NBC sitcom, 227. 227 was adapted from a play directed by Cambridge Players' then-president Ed Cambridge and was presented to NBC by Cambridge, at Gibbs' Crossroads Theater in L.A. He served as artistic director. The series aired until 1990, producing 116 episodes. Two decades later, Gibbs teamed again with former 227 co-star Jackée Harry in The First Family, where Gibbs had a recurring role as Harry's on-screen mother Grandma Eddy. Then, she again worked with Harry in the independent film Forbidden Woman. Gibbs had a number of supporting film roles, and guest starred on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Touched by an Angel (with Della Reese), Judging Amy, ER, and Southland.From 1998 to 2002 she had a recurring role on The Hughleys. In 2012, Gibbs appeared in the Tyler Perry film Madea's Witness Protection, and in 2014 she starred in the independent film, Grantham & Rose. In 2015, Gibbs made two appearances in the Shonda Rhimes' drama series, Scandal.She later guest starred on Hot in Cleveland, American Horror Story: Hotel and This Is Us. In 2018, she was cast in a recurring role on the ABC drama series Station 19. Gibbs also has had starring roles in two television pilots: Old Soul alongside Ellen Burstyn and Rita Moreno for NBC in 2014, and ABC's Jalen Vs. Everybody in 2017 In film, she co-starred in Lemon and Please Stand By. Gibbs reprised her role as Florence on Live in Front of a Studio Audience: Norman Lear's All in the Family and The Jeffersons, less than a month before her 88th birthday

Marlys Burdette
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Marlys Burdette is an actress who played three uncredited roles in the second season of "Star Trek" TOS episodes as a 'serving girl' in "Wolf in the Fold" an 'Annabelle series' android in "I, Mudd", and 'Krako's gun moll' in "A Piece of the Action".

Marlys filmed her scenes for "Wolf in the Fold" on Monday 3 July1967 at Desilu Stage 10, her scene for "I, Mudd" on Wednesday 16 August 1967 at Stage 10, and her scenes for "A Piece of the Action" on Wednesday 8 November 1967 at Stage 11. Born in Brillian, North Dakota, USA and later attending high school in Walla Walla, Washington. Marlys began achieving notice as a model around 1962 when she competed in several modeling contests, including one for Miss Photogenic, and was the first runner-up of the Long Beach Miss Bikini contest. In 1963, she was the third runner-up of the first Miss California Bikini contest held in Los Angeles. Burdette's acting career ranged from TV commercials, to television, and included several movies, namely several Elvis Presley films. Her television appearances included "Dean Martin Special," "Ironside", and "The Mod Squad", later appearing in two segments of "The Name of the Game." She also appeared in ads for Schlitz, American Airlines, and Ford Motors. Between acting appearances, Burdette attended UCLA and worked as a real estate broker in the North Hollywood area. Marlys also appeared in the films "The April Fools" (1969, with Sally Kellerman and Felix Silla), "The Phynx" (1970, with Michael Ansara, Lou Antonio, Al Cavens, Larry Hankin, and Monty O'Grady, as well as stunts by Phil Adams, Bill Catching, Chuck O'Brien, and Jerry Summers)[3], and "The Grasshopper" (1970; with Stanley Adams).

Mews Small
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Mews Small is an American actress and singer. She was known professionally as Marya Small during the 1970s and has also been credited as Merrya Small, Mary Small Rusk, and Mary Small.

Small got her acting start in a 1966 theatre production of The Sound of Music in Stowe, Vermont. She has since acted in numerous feature films and television shows. Small originated the role of Frenchy in the original Broadway production of the musical Grease, with a cast including Barry Bostwick and Adrienne Barbeau She was later joined by cast members John Travolta, Patrick Swayze, Treat Williams, and Marilu Henner. Small is best known for her roles as Candy in the film One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Dr. Nero in Woody Allen's film Sleeper. She also portrayed the Janis Joplin-inspired role of Frankie in the animated rotoscope film American Pop. Small appeared in the first episode of "Kolchak: The Night Stalker" in 1975. Mews is the lead singer of her band Mews Small and The Small Band, who has released a CD Do What You Do in 2008. She also sings regularly with Suzy Williams, and the two have written songs together.

Michael Forest
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Mike Forest has been working in the entertainment business – film, television, radio, theatre – since he was in his teens! He has appeared in hundreds of television episodes, dozens of feature films, appeared on Broadway, in regional theatre and in local Los Angeles theatre – and voiced many hundreds of characters for animation (anime) and replaced voices (dubbing) in features and for television both here and in Europe. In addition to his enormous list of credits in the United States, he also built up a huge resume of work in Europe, having spent 10 years living in Rome. Michael filmed not only in Italy, but also in Spain, Yugoslavia, North Africa, on the CBC in Canada, and other areas.

One of Michael Forest’s signature performances was the God Apollo in the Original Star Trek Series episode “Who Mourns For Adonais.” It plays on the Sci Fi Channel constantly and is one of the series’ most respected episodes. His motorcycle riding alien in “Black Leather Jackets” on The Twilight Zone is another episode that hits the tv airwaves often. Now that so many of the early television programs are available on dvd, a number of the huge catalogue of Westerns he shot in the 50s and 60s are starting to run on television. GUNSMOKE, HERE COME THE BRIDES, BONANZA, BRANDED, DANIEL BOONE, LAREDO, RAWHIDE, THE VIRGINIAN, LARAMIE, WAGON TRAIN and of course the film, 100 RIFLES, which brought him to Europe in the first place. And there are so many more. Michael co-starred in a recurring role (with Roger Moore) on THE ALASKANS; he did the pilot for IT TAKES A THIEF, twice; GILLIGAN’S ISLAND, GET SMART, THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. – too, too many to mention here. In addition to other Soap Opera’s in which he appeared, Mike ran three years as a regular on HOW THE WORLD TURNS. His anime characters are on-going and there are already at least four pages of titles on imdb now – one of his favorite characters was a running part on POWER RANGERS (Olympias). His most recent television appearances were on ALIAS and COLD CASE. He just completed work as the Guest Star on a new web series - STAR TREK CONTINUES reprising his iconic role of the God Apollo - as an older man. Mike recently completed filming on a short film When The Train Stops. Check him out on imdb – 12 pages of credits – and that isn’t all there is!!! Michael’s theatre credits span almost 60 years. He co-starred on Broadway in BREAKFAST WITH LES AND BES, he starred (understudied and went on for Frank Langella) in PICTURES AT AN EXECUTION at the Mark Taper Forum, played the leads in numerous Shakespearean plays at the Old Globe in San Diego, Milwaukee Rep, Seattle Rep and others. He has starred and co-starred in many Los Angeles, San Jose, and Seattle theatrical productions.

Michelle Weeks
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Michelle Weeks, At the age of four she began singing with the Institutional Children’s Choir and at age 13 she portrayed the role of young Mahalia Jackson in the Musical based on her life called Mahalia. Also at the age of 13 Michelle was crowned Ms New York for Hal Jackson’s Talented Teens and she won 2nd place at the international pageant.

Michelle has traveled through out the US, Europe, Asia and Australia. She has performed at Lincoln Center, Julliard and many other major music halls. Michelle has been in a number of stage productions including “The Me Nobody Knows”, “Godspell” and “The Tap Dance Kid” where she made her Broadway debut. Her role as the Queen of New York in the Las Vegas production of Madhattan afforded her the opportunity to perform for stars like Debbie Allen, Ben Vereen, David Cassidy and James Ingram just to name a few Michelle also starred in the cult film classic “Little Shop Of Horrors” where she played the role of Ronnette. She has also been heard on various commercials, soundtracks and as a background vocalist on numerous recordings.

Mitzi McCall
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Mitzi McCall is an American actress. In the early 1950s, then known as Mitzi Steiner, McCall had the Kiddie Castle program on KDKA-TV in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She received national attention in 1952 via an Associated Press story about a five-year-old Pittsburgh girl with a cleft palate who spoke her first words while watching the actress in a pantomime on television. Afterward, doctors "didn't know what to say. They held a special meeting, examined Claire, and told the happy parents that she was cured.

In 1953, she was featured on Studio 10, a program on KGTV in San Diego, California. She performed in productions at The Pittsburgh Playhouse before heading to Hollywood. She appeared on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In. and was also a series regular on such television series as Life Goes On and (with her husband) on Silk Stalkings. On animated series, she provided the voice of Auntie Marina in Snorks, the voice of Mother Goose in Mother Goose and Grimm, the voice of Sylvia Jenkins in Free for All,and a variety of voices on The Paw Paws. She played Miriam Lerner on Alright Already. Other credits include guest appearances on The Twilight Zone, Maude, Dharma & Greg, Chuck, as well as voice over work for many cartoons. In 1971, she was the voice of Penny on The Flintstones spin-off The Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm Show. She was a panelist on the game show Match Game during its 1970s revival, and appeared with Charlie Brill on Tattletales. McCall and Brill] McCall and Charlie Brill appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show on February 9, 1964, the episode that featured the U.S. television debut of The Beatles. Their act can be seen on the DVD of the Beatles' appearances on the Sullivan show. They were interviewed in 2005 for the "Big Break" episode of Public Radio International radio program This American Life, regarding their Beatles-Sullivan experience, including a dressing room encounter with John Lennon. In 1967, McCall and Brill had a comedy recording, From Our Point of View, released by ABC Records

Nancy Allen
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Nancy Allen (born June 24, 1950) is an American actress. She came to prominence for her performances in several films directed by Brian De Palma in the 1970s and early 1980s. Her accolades include a Golden Globe Award nomination and three Saturn Award nominations.

In her early twenties, she shifted her focus to acting and relocated to Los Angeles to pursue a career there. Her first major role was as Chris Hargensen in Brian De Palma's film adaptation of Carrie (1976). Allen was subsequently cast as the lead in the Robert Zemeckis-directed comedy I Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978), followed by a supporting part in Steven Spielberg's 1941 (1979). In 1979 her subsequent portrayal of a prostitute who witnesses a murder in his feature Dressed to Kill (1980) earned her a Golden Globe nomination for New Star of the Year. She then appeared in De Palma's neo-noir film Blow Out (1981), playing a woman implicated in an assassination. She appeared in the science fiction films Strange Invaders (1983) and The Philadelphia Experiment (1984), and Abel Ferrara's television film The Gladiator (1986). Allen garnered mainstream fame playing Anne Lewis in Paul Verhoeven's RoboCop (1987), a role she reprised for the two sequels that followed. Other credits include Poltergeist III (1988), Limit Up (1990), and Les patriotes (1994). Allen's first major film role was as Nancy, Jack Nicholson's nervous date, in The Last Detail (1973), directed by Hal Ashby. This inspired her to move to Los Angeles to continue her acting career Initially, However, in November 1975, she auditioned for the role of the spoiled and popular mean girl Christine Hargensen in director Brian De Palma's horror film Carrie (1976) opposite Sissy Spacek, Amy Irving, and John Travolta, as the title character's chief nemesis. After a protracted casting process (in which Allen was nearly re-cast at the instruction of the producers), she was officially given the role. Allen next appeared in the role of Pam Mitchell in Steven Spielberg's production of I Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978), which was director Robert Zemeckis's first feature film.[11] She then played Donna Stratton in the Spielberg-directed comedy 1941 (1979) opposite Tim Matheson, John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd, and John Candy. She married director Brian De Palma on January 12, 1979, and over the next several years appeared in three of his films: She starred as Kristina in Home Movies (1980) with Kirk Douglas, followed by her portrayal of prostitute Liz Blake in the thriller Dressed to Kill (1980).For her performance, she was nominated for a Golden Globe for New Star of the Year. She next starred in her last collaboration with De Palma, the neo-noir Blow Out (1981), playing a woman involved in an assassination that is audibly captured by a sound engineer. In filming the Blow Out, she had to overcome a lifelong fear of being trapped in a submerged car filling with water In 1983, Allen starred as supermarket tabloid reporter Betty Walker in Strange Invaders, written by Bill Condon and co-starring Paul LeMat and Michael Lerner., two of Allen's films were released, The Buddy System opposite Richard Dreyfuss and Susan Sarandon and The Philadelphia Experiment opposite Michael Paré. For her role in the latter, Allen was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Actress. She also hosted the documentary Terror in the Aisles (1984), which presents clips from various horror features, including Dressed to Kill and Carrie. Paul Bartel's Not for Publication and Sweet Revenge, an action caper about white slavery with Gina Gershon and Martin Landau, followed thereafter. Allen played police officer Anne Lewis in the science fiction/action classic RoboCop (1987) opposite Peter Weller in the title role The film, which was the Hollywood debut of Dutch director Paul Verhoeven, did extremely well at the box office. Allen was nominated for another Saturn Award for Best Actress. After the success of RoboCop, Allen starred in Abel Ferrara's The Gladiator (1987) and as Patricia Wilson-Gardner in Poltergeist III (1988) opposite Tom Skerritt, Lara Flynn Boyle, and Heather O'Rourke, who died before production was completed. Allen reprised her role as Officer Lewis in RoboCop 2 (1990) alongside Weller. To make her character tougher and more involved in the physical action, she studied martial arts and participated in police training. She recalled the filming of RoboCop 2 as unpleasant, however, and later referred to director Irvin Kershner as a "miserable human being." That same year, Allen top-lined Richard Martini's Limit Up. As commodities trader Casey Falls, Allen showcased her comedic abilities. The lighthearted romp also featured Danitra Vance and blues icon Ray Charles. In 1990, Allen also had the distinction of starring in the first-ever original film made for the Lifetime television network, the highly-rated Memories of Murder. Allen played Officer Lewis a third time in RoboCop 3 (1993) and was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress. For her third performance as the feisty cop, she worked to soften the usually tough-as-nails demeanor of the character: "You do your job and you become more confident with yourself. Therefore, you don't have to prove yourself to anyone and basically deny your womanhood. (It's) not a dirty word. It's actually an asset. And that's what I wanted to show – to loosen her up in that way." The same year, Allen also appeared with Linda Fiorentino in Acting on Impulse.

Richard Edson
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Richard Edson is an American actor In 1979, Richard was a founding member of the San Francisco art rock band The Alterboys with Snuky Tate, Tono Rondone, Richard Kelly and JC Garrett, playing both drums and trumpet. From 1981 to 1982, he was Sonic Youth's original drummer and played drums for Konk at the same time. After the release of Sonic Youth's self-titled debut album, Edson left the band to play with Konk full-time.

Following his music career, Edson has worked as an actor, appearing in over 35 movies. His more notable roles include a disreputable parking garage attendant in Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986), man at newspaper stand in Desperately Seeking Susan (1985), Richie in Howard the Duck (1986), Eddie in Jim Jarmusch's cult film Stranger Than Paradise (1984), real-life gambler Billy Maharg in Eight Men Out, and the title character in Joey Breaker (1993). He also appeared in Platoon (1986), Good Morning, Vietnam (1987), Tougher Than Leather (1988), Let It Ride (1989), and Do the Right Thing (1989). He starred in the 1993 movie Super Mario Bros as Spike, King Koopa's cousin. In 1987, Edson performed live a main role in the Scott B and Joseph Nechvatal collaboration called Not a Door: A Spectacle at Hallwalls, based on the poetry of St. John of the Cross, Flaubert's Temptation of St. Anthony and works of Jean Genet and Georges Bataille. Edson played the lead role in three films directed by Raphael Nadjari: The Shade (1999), I Am Josh Polonski's Brother (2001) and Apartment #5c (2002). In 2003, he appeared in the music video for Cave In's single, "Anchor". Edson played the central character of the video, a depressed man walking down the street with his feet encased in cement blocks. His television appearances include The Adventures of Pete & Pete; the third season finale of Homicide: Life on the Street; and the 1990–91 series Shannon's Deal, produced by John Sayles. Edson appeared in a 2007 TV commercial for The Travelers Companies Inc., in which he plays the human personification of risk.

Rico E. Anderson
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Rico Elliott Anderson is an American film and television actor who has appeared in over 90 TV shows, films, and commercials

Following his graduation, Anderson moved to Los Angeles to pursue a full-time acting career. He acted in the award-winning documentary Mighty Times: The Children's March in 2005. In 2010 he performed in the play The Ballad of Emmett Till at the Fountain Theatre in Los Angeles. He also performed in the play Dessalines (The Heart) Blood and Liberation. In 2015 Anderson played the role of Boras in the film Star Trek: Renegades.He received a "best actor" award in 2016 at the Pasadena International Film Festival for his role in the film Dreams My Master In 2017 he hosted the Third Annual Short Film Awards ceremony in New York

Ron Masak
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Ron Masak is an American actor. He began as a stage performer, and much of his work was in theater until he transitioned to film and television, where he became a familiar character actor.

As with many performers, it was the Army that provided Ron with a platform from which to display his all-around talents for performing, writing and directing. In 1960-61, Ron toured the world doing vocal impressions in the all-Army show entitled "Rolling Along". In 1968, he appeared alongside Vince Lombardi in the short film, Second Effort.That same year, he also appeared in a supporting role in the submarine action film Ice Station Zebra. In addition to two guest appearances on the sitcom I Dream of Jeannie, he also had a role in the pilot film for "Jeannie" star Barbara Eden's subsequent series Harper Valley PTA and worked again with "Jeannie" co-star Larry Hagman in an episode of the crime series The Rockford Files. Masak's first screen role was as the Harmonica Man in "The Purple Testament", an episode of The Twilight Zone in 1960. Masak appeared as "Mike the boxer" on The Flying Nun, season 1, episode 26 ("Where There's a Will"), which first aired March 13, 1968. Masak appeared as "Officer #2" on Bewitched, Season 7, Episode 4 ("Samantha's Hot Bedwarmer"), first aired on October 15, 1970, and “Irving Bates Sr” Season 6, Episode 23 (“Just a Kid Again”). He had a guest appearance as Beauregard Jackson in the episode "Hurricane" on Land of the Lost. He appeared in the second season of Barney Miller episode of "The Horse Thief" as officer Shriker, and was a guest star in the "Welcome Home, Vince" episode of The Feather and Father Gang in 1977 and in the episode "The Two-Million-Dollar Stowaway" of The Eddie Capra Mysteries in 1978. In 1981, he guest starred on the Magnum, P.I. episode "Skin Deep". He also guest starred on an episode of Quincy, M.E. He is perhaps best known for a recurring role on Murder, She Wrote as the Cadillac convertible-driving Sheriff, Mort Metzger, although he did make appearances as two other characters in the series, in "Footnote to Murder" as Lt. Lyle Meyer and in "No Accounting for Murder" as Marty Giles. In the 1980s and early 1990s, he was dubbed "The King of Commercials" for his many commercials, including voice-over work, most notably for a Vlasic pickles ad. From 1982-83, he voiced "Meatballs" on the CBS cartoon series Meatballs & Spaghetti. He did the voice for Veteran Holt in the video-game Medal of Honor: European Assault. In 1990, Masak was a panelist on the revival of the television game show, To Tell the Truth, and appeared on several other game shows as a panelist (including Match Game, Password Plus and Super Password). He appeared as Eddie Fenelle, a taxi-driver, in the Columbo episode Ashes to Ashes (1998).

Shanna Moakler
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Actress, Entrepreneur, and Philanthropist Shanna Moakler has made a name for herself over the years for her work in film, television, print, and more. Her stunning beauty combined with street smarts, determination, and raw talent have kept her a force to be reckoned with in the entertainment business.

Born in Providence, Rhode Island Shanna always had dreams of being in the entertainment industry. While growing up, television and film opportunities were rare in the Rhode Island area, so she got her foot in the door through modeling, and entering pageants. By fifteen years old she was making regular trips to Boston for modeling jobs, and at seventeen she represented Rhode Island in the Miss Teen USA pageant. She then went on to win the Miss Teen All American title. As soon as she graduated from high school, Shanna moved to Miami to pursue the entertainment industry full time. There, she quickly made a name for herself, landing national and international campaigns with big name brands such as TJ Maxx and Stoli Vodka, Calvin Klein and appeared in numerous fashion magazines, from Cosmopolitian, seventeen, Maxim and many more, at the age of 19 she went on to win the Miss New York USA title. Shanna had her sights set on moving to New York to pursue modeling on a bigger scale, and continue competing in pageants. Once she relocated to the Big Apple, she began walking in high profile fashion shows for top designers, including Calvin Klein. She went on to win the title of Miss New York USA, and soon after took home the prestigious title of Miss USA. She was the youngest woman to achieve this title, in a decade. Once Shanna had the crown, she moved once again to Los Angeles, to start a career in television in film. Beginning in 1998, Moakler was a regular on the television drama "Pacific Blue", the USA Network series featured a team of police officers who patrolled the beaches of Santa Monica, California on bicycles. Shanna played 'Officer Monica Harper', described as the trouble-maker rookie. Shanna has admitted that, even equipped with a $5,000 Trek bike, she was somewhat accident-prone on the set, saying that when the cast had to "ride really close together for the camera." She was also featured 2 times on the Maxim hot 100 list and was a Playboy Playmate of the Month in 2001. Shanna recently joined the cast of “Growing Up Supermodel” which follows the family dynamics and exciting and unpredictable careers of some of the top young models on the scene today.

Sharyn Hillyer
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Sharyn Hillyer is a television actress who made an appearance on "Star Trek" TOS as the Second Girl in the episode "A Piece of the Action". She filmed her scene on Monday 6 November 1967 on location at Paramount Pictures' McFadden Street backlot.

Working in television from 1960 through 1968, she made multiple appearances on "The Adventures of Ozzy & Harriet", "Burke's Law", and "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." and single appearances on shows like "The Monkees" and "Get Smart." In addition, she had a role in the 1963 Oscar-winning film "Hud" (co-starring Whit Bissell) and was seen (albeit uncredited) in the 1967 comedy "A Guide for the Married Man" (also featuring Majel Barrett, Jeffrey Hunter, Jason Wingreen, and Lucille Ball). Some of her appearances on "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." were incorporated into the 'U.N.C.L.E' feature films "The Spy in the Green Hat" and "The Karate Killers."

Teresa Ganzel
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Ganzel is probably known best as a recurring cast member of The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson in the role of the Matinee Lady in the popular "Tea Time Movie" skits. She has often played stereotypical ditzy blonde bimbo roles, including as Greedy Gretchen in the Three's Company episode "Lies My Roommate Told Me" (1981), National Lampoon's Movie Madness (1982), the film The Toy (1982) with Jackie Gleason and Richard Pryor, and the Married... with Children episode "A Three Job, No Income Family" (1989)

In 1984, Ganzel played another young and ditzy blonde, Sheree Winkler, in the short-lived sitcom The Duck Factory, which introduced a young Jim Carrey to American audiences. She was a frequent game show celebrity in the 1980s, particularly on the $25,000 and $100,000 incarnations of Pyramid, as well as a recurring celebrity on the 1986–1989 version of Hollywood Squares. She also appeared as a celebrity in the game show pilot for Money in the Blank (1987). Ganzel has had several voice-over roles on cartoons, animated movies, and series, notably Cow and Chicken, The Emperor's New School, Monsters, Inc., Goof Troop, Aaahh!!! Real Monsters, Rugrats, and Horton Hears a Who!. Her first venture into voice acting was playing Kitty Glitter in Top Cat and the Beverly Hills Cats. Her best-known role in animation, Miss Vavoom, is an homage to all of the sexy film stars, singers, and damsels in distress who served as Droopy's love interest in the Tex Avery cartoons. Ganzel appears in Tom & Jerry Kids and Droopy, Master Detective.

Tichina Arnold
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an American actress, comedian, and singer. She began her career as a child actor, appearing in supporting roles in Little Shop of Horrors (1986) and How I Got into College (1989) before being cast as Pamela "Pam" James on the FOX sitcom Martin, which she played from 1992 until the show ended in 1997.

Arnold also played the family matriarch Rochelle on the UPN/CW sitcom Everybody Hates Chris from 2005 to 2009, and portrayed Judi Mann in the TV Land original sitcom Happily Divorced from 2011 to 2013. From 2014 to 2017, she played the lead role of Cassie Calloway on Survivor's Remorse. Since 2018, Arnold currently plays Tina Butler in the CBS sitcom series The Neighborhood. In 1986, Arnold appeared as Crystal, one of the three chorus girls who perform R&B numbers in Frank Oz's film musical Little Shop of Horrors (1986) along with future Martin co-star Tisha Campbell. Arnold was only sixteen at the time of filming, and her career continued steadily after that, with a role or two almost every year, including the films How I Got into College and the Paul Mazursky/Woody Allen collaboration Scenes from a Mall (1991). In February 1987 Arnold scored her first big break on television, with a permanent role on the soap opera Ryan's Hope. Her critically lauded role, as young heroine Zena Brown, landed her a Daytime Emmy Award nomination in 1988. She continued in the role until the series ended in January 1989. Later that year, Arnold was cast as Sharla Valentine, a high-school friend of Emily Ann Sago (played by Liz Vassey) on the ABC-TV daytime drama All My Children. She continued in the role until 1991. Arnold's best-known television role was Pamela James on Martin Lawrence's sitcom Martin (1992–1997). She also played the recurring role of Nicole Barnes on the sitcom One on One. In 2000, she was reunited with Martin Lawrence in Big Momma's House. In 2007, she again reunited with Lawrence (this time as his character's wife) in the big screen road comedy/buddy film Wild Hogs. In 2003, she appeared in Civil Brand. Arnold played the role of the matriarch, Rochelle, on the sitcom Everybody Hates Chris which premiered in September 2005 and ended in May 2009. In a departure from her known comedic roles, she played the title role in The Lena Baker Story (2008), which was about the first and only woman to be executed by the electric chair in Georgia. Arnold also played the voice of the friend in The Boondocks, episode "Attack of the Killer Kung-fu Wolf Bitch" which aired in 2007. In 2009, Arnold appeared onstage in The Wiz revival at the New York City Center in the part of Evillene, The Wicked Witch of the West. In 2010 she guest starred in the one-hour episode premiere of the Disney XD Original Series Pair of Kings as Aunt Nancy, and also reprise her role for one more episode. Arnold played the best friend of Fran Drescher in the TV Land sitcom Happily Divorced, which is based on Fran Drescher's real-life marriage and divorce to series co-creator Peter Marc Jacobson.

Tisha Campbell
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an American actress, singer, and dancer. she made her screen debut appearing in the 1986 rock musical comedy film Little Shop of Horrors, and later starred on the short-lived NBC musical comedy drama Rags to Riches (1987–1988).

Campbell has appeared in films including School Daze (1988), Rooftops (1989), Another 48 Hrs. (1990), Boomerang (1992), and Sprung (1997). She received Independent Spirit Award for Best Supporting Female nomination for her performance in the 1990 comedy film House Party, and later starred in its two sequels; House Party 2 (1991), and House Party 3 (1994). On television, Campbell starred as Gina Waters-Payne in the Fox comedy series Martin from 1992 to 1997 and as Janet "Jay" Marie Johnson-Kyle in the ABC comedy series My Wife and Kids (2001–2005), for which she received NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series. She later had regular roles on Rita Rocks (Lifetime, 2008–2009), The Protector (Lifetime, 2011), and Dr. Ken (ABC, 2015–2017) Campbell's first television appearance was at the age of six, in an episode in 1974 of the PBS show The Big Blue Marble. As a child, she won many talent shows, going on to appear in such children's programs as Kids Are People Too, Unicorn Tales, and Captain Kangaroo. At age 18, she performed in the musical feature film, Little Shop of Horrors as Chiffon, one of The Supremes like girl group Greek Chorus, along with future Martin co star, Tichina Arnold. After graduating from the Arts High School in Newark, she moved to Hollywood, where she became a star on the short lived NBC musical comedy-drama series, Rags to Riches (1987–88). She later starred in the musical comedy drama film School Daze as Jane Toussaint, directed by Spike Lee. In 1989, Campbell costarred in the crime film Rooftops, and the following year starred alongside Eddie Murphy in the action comedy Another 48 Hrs.. She later appeared in an supporting role in the 1992 romantic comedy Boomerang starring Murphy. Her most notable film credit is 1990 comedy House Party for which she received Independent Spirit Award for Best Supporting Female nomination. She later co starred in its two sequels; House Party 2 (1991), and House Party 3 (1994). In 1997, she received her star billed role in the Trimark Pictures' comedy film Sprung. She later had the leading role in the independent drama film The Last Place on Earth (2002), and has appeared in sex comedy film Zack and Miri Make a Porno (2008) playing Craig Robinson's character wife. In 1992, Campbell was cast as Regina "Gina" Waters-Payne in the Fox comedy series Martin. She left the show in April 1997, after settling the lawsuit against Martin Lawrence of sexual harassment. The following year, she starred opposite Diahann Carroll in the Hallmark Hall of Fame film The Sweetest Gift (1998). Campbell returned to television in 2001, starring opposite Damon Wayans in the ABC comedy series My Wife and Kids. The series ran for five seasons, until 2005. In 2003, she won NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series for her role. After My Wife and Kids, Campbell had the recurring role on Everybody Hates Chris, and was regular in the Lifetime comedy series Rita Rocks (2008–09). In 2011, she starred opposite Ally Walker in the Lifetime police drama The Protector. The series was canceled after a single season. In September 2015, she was cast in the ABC sitcom Dr. Ken, starring Ken Jeong The series was cancelled after two seasons in 2017. In the beginning of 2018, she played mother in the Lifetime The Simone Biles Story: Courage to Soar . Later in 2018, Campbell went to star on the ABC drama pilot The Holmes Sisters about the lives of five African-American sisters, all officers in the NYPD. It was produced by Regina King and Robin Roberts. Music In 1992, Campbell released her debut album, Tisha, which was a moderate success, selling 40,000 copies. Two singles received minor airplay on the R&B stations: "Push", which was co written and produced by Campbell's' friend, Vanilla Ice, and "Love Me Down". Campbell contributed vocals for the soundtrack of the 1997 film, Sprung, in which she starred, singing a cover version of "Don't Ask My Neighbor" with her Martin costar Tichina Arnold. She appeared in several music videos in the 1990s and 2000s, including two for Will Smith ("Will 2K" and "Wild Wild West") and one for Toni Braxton ("You're Makin' Me High"). In 2012, Campbell starred in Mindless Behavior's music video for "Hello". On September 21, 2015, she released the single, "Steel Here". On February 24, 2016, Campbell released the single, "Lazy Bitch", as well as an accompanying video, where she featured her friend, Tasha Smith. On February 2, 2018, Campbell released the single, "I Don't Wanna Be Alone Tonight".

Victor Brandt
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Victor Brandt is best known for his portrayal in over 100 TV and movie roles. He has appeared as an actor in several classic shows such as Star Trek: The Original Series, As Tongo Rad in "The Way to Eden" and Watson in "Elaan Of Troyius." Mission Impossible and T. J. Hooker.

He has provided voices for various shows such as Superman: The Animated Series, Master Pakku in Avatar: The Last Airbender, as Rupert Thorne in The Batman animated series, and as General Crozier in Metalocalypse.

Victoria George
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Victoria George played the character 'Ensign Jana Haines' in the "Star Trek" TOS second season episode "The Gamesters of Triskelion". She filmed her scenes on Tuesday 17 October 1967 at Desilu Stage 9.

Victoria credits include: "Twelve O'Clock High" (1966), "The Green Hornet" (1966), "Search" (1972) and the films; "El Dorado" (1966, starring John Wayne ), "The Last Rebel" (1971), "Mr. Billion" (1977).