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Erin Murphy
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Erin Murphy is an American actress, who is best known for her role as young Tabitha Stephens in the television sitcom Bewitched, in 103 episodes from the show's third season (in 1966) to the last original episode in 1972. For the first season, she shared this role for 18 episodes with her fraternal twin sister, Diane, as they were of similar appearance and stature. As they got older and looked less alike, only Erin played the role. Both sisters are the last surviving original actors of Bewitched.

Following Bewitched, Murphy guest-starred on shows such as Lassie, appeared in over 100 commercials, and modeled for Hang Ten swimwear. She was an El Toro High School cheerleader and homecoming queen. Murphy has worked as a casting director, makeup artist, fashion stylist, acting teacher, motivational speaker, and stunt double for actress Virginia Madsen. Since 2014, Murphy has been co-owner of Slim Chillers, a company that makes low-calorie frozen vodka martini pops. Murphy has worked as a television host and correspondent (TVLand, Fox Reality Channel, TVGasm.com, and E!) and as the on-air moderator for Allergan Medical. She has also been an infomercial host (Ab Shark for Thane, Bun Shaper for Emson, SomaTrac Inversion Table). Murphy is the host of Disney Family.com's Parentpedia. On December 20, 2006, she appeared as one of the 12 "strangers" on the NBC game show Identity. In 2007, she was featured on CNN Headline News as a "Celebrity With a Cause" discussing her work with autism-related charities. In 2008, Murphy appeared as celebrity judge on Danny Bonaduce's I Know My Kid's a Star reality show contest for young actors and with Bob Saget on 1 vs. 100. She has also appeared on Craft Lab (DIY/HGTV), Groomer Has It (Animal Planet) with her giant Leonberger, and on Over Your Head (HGTV) building flagstone steps in her backyard. Murphy also starred on Hulk Hogan's Celebrity Championship Wrestling series for CMT, in which the celebrities trained as professional wrestlers. Erin's wrestling persona is Mistress of Mayhem (aka M.O.M.) Murphy was a contestant in the celebrity finale of season one of Rupaul's Drag U. Murphy appeared as a central character in the January 26, 2021 episode of To Tell the Truth

Wendi Lou Lee
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Michael Landon had to cast several child actors when he launched Little House on the Prairie in 1974. Wendi Lou Lee landed the role of Grace Ingalls as a toddler, switching off with her twin sister Brenda on playing the part. Lee shared some treasured memories from her time on the historical drama.

Michael Landon had to cast several child actors when he launched Little House on the Prairie in 1974. Wendi Lou Lee landed the role of Grace Ingalls as a toddler, switching off with her twin sister Brenda on playing the part. Lee shared some treasured memories from her time on the historical drama.

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Alanna Ubach
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Alanna Ubach is an American actress, known for her roles as Mamá Imelda in Coco (2017), Serena McGuire in Legally Blonde (2001), Isabel Villalobos in Meet the Fockers (2004), and Suze Howard in Euphoria.

She has provided voices for several characters in a number of animated television shows and movies, such as Liz Allan on The Spectacular Spider-Man, the title character on El Tigre: The Adventures of Manny Rivera, Lola Boa on Brandy & Mr. Whiskers, Strudel on Pound Puppies, and four characters in the Oscar-winning animated film Rango (2011). She played the first female assistant, Josie, on the television show Beakman's World. In 1994, , she landed a regular spot as Josie the assistant in the TV series, Beakman's World. Her early film roles include Airborne (1993), Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit (1993), Renaissance Man (1994) and The Brady Bunch Movie (1995). She later had roles in a series of indie films: Denise Calls Up (1995), in which she played the title character; Johns (1996), playing David Arquette's girlfriend, and in Freeway (1996) with Reese Witherspoon and Kiefer Sutherland, playing a Latina gang girl. She also played roles in more mainstream films like Clockwatchers (1997) and alongside Reese Witherspoon in the two Legally Blonde films In 2004, Ubach starred in the movie Waiting..., alongside Ryan Reynolds and Anna Faris, and landed the role of a Latina maid/caterer in Meet The Fockers (2004). She also had recurring roles in Hung (2009) and Californication (2013). Ubach stars with Lisa Edelstein as a regular cast member on Bravo's first scripted series, Girlfriends' Guide to Divorce Ubach portrays Jo, who moves to Los Angeles to reinvent herself in the guest house of her newly divorced best friend from college, Abby. Ubach describes the show as "fun and stylish, it's very relatable".

Alison Arngrim
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Alison Arngrim is a Young Artist Award–Former Child Star "Lifetime Achievement" Award honoree, best known for her portrayal of Nellie Oleson on the NBC television series Little House on the Prairie from 1974 to 1982.

After beginning a career as a child model and actress in television commercials, Arngrim rose to fame as a child star in 1974, portraying the role of Nellie Oleson on the NBC television series Little House on the Prairie. She originally auditioned for the role of Laura Ingalls and, later, Mary Ingalls, but was instead cast in the role of antagonist Nellie Oleson. Arngrim would play the role of Nellie for seven seasons and her portrayal became a cultural reference and camp archetype for the spoiled "bad girl" throughout the 1970s Years later, in one of her stand-up routines, Arngrim described playing Nellie on Little House on The Prairie as "like having PMS for seven years." In 2002, she was honored by the Young Artist Foundation with its Former Child Star "Lifetime Achievement" Award for her work as a child actress on Little House. At the 2006 TV Land Awards, Arngrim tied with Danielle Spencer ('Dee' on What's Happening!!) as the "Character Most in Need of a Time-out" for her role as Nellie. In addition to her role on Little House, Arngrim also recorded the comedy record album, Heeere's Amy, in which she portrayed first daughter Amy Carter. Her mother, who voiced the Kennedy children on the comedy albums of Vaughn Meader, also guest starred on the album. After leaving Little House, Arngrim appeared in guest-starring roles on such television series as The Love Boat and Fantasy Island. She was also a frequent panelist on the short-lived NBC game show Match Game-Hollywood Squares Hour.

Angel Tompkins
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Angel Tompkins is an American actress. She appeared in several films and television shows, and is a Golden Globe nominee.

Angel Tompkins was a model in the Chicago area before being discovered by Woody Allen, who sent her to Universal Pictures. She was signed and became part of the last Universal contract players. She started her television and film-acting career in the late 1960s. She made her major film debut as the seductive blonde who came between husband and wife, Elliott Gould and Brenda Vaccaro, in the comedy I Love My Wife (1970), and was nominated for a Golden Globe award. Tompkins was featured in the pictorial "Angel" in the February 1972 edition of Playboy; subsequently, the magazine used her in three more editions, all presumably related to that film promotion She appeared in Prime Cut (1972) with Lee Marvin, Gene Hackman, and Sissy Spacek and Little Cigars (1973) as a gangster's moll who teams up with a gang of little people. She also appeared with Anthony Quinn in The Don Is Dead (1973), with former child star Jay North in The Teacher (1974), and with Bo Svenson in the action sequel Walking Tall Part 2 (1975). Her later films included The One Man Jury (1978), The Bees (1978), Alligator (1980), The Naked Cage (1986), Dangerously Close (1986), and Murphy's Law (1986), opposite Charles Bronson. In 1987, Tompkins appeared in the comedy film Amazon Women on the Moon and with Ann-Margret in the film A Tiger's Tale, and made her last film appearances in Relentless (1989) and Crack House (1989). She also works in the commercial voice-over field. On television, Tompkins appeared in the pilot for Search (1972). The pilot was originally titled Probe, but the title was changed to Search due to a PBS program already having that title. She also appeared in several of the early episodes of Search. She appeared in many guest spots on shows such as The Wild Wild West (1965), Mannix (1967), Dragnet (1969 episode "Forgery: (DR-33)"), Bonanza (1970), Police Woman (1970), Kojak (1977), The Eddie Capra Mysteries (1978), Three's Company (1978) Knight Rider (1983), and Simon & Simon (1981). Tompkins additionally appeared in the episode "Gallery of Fear" on the Canadian sci-fi program The Starlost.

Ann Dusenberry
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Ann Dusenberry is an American film, stage and television actress.

Ann Dusenberry played Amory (alias Angel Collins) in Stonestreet: Who Killed the Centerfold Model? (1977), and Amy March in Little Women in a two-part miniseries on NBC in 1978, and returned to the role in a full series the next year In 1978, she appeared as beauty queen Tina Wilcox in Jaws 2. She co-starred as Lucy Barker’s daughter Margot McGibbon in the short-lived 1986 Lucille Ball series Life with Lucy.

Anson Williams
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Anson Williams is an American actor, singer, and director, best known for his role as gullible, well-intentioned singer Warren "Potsie" Weber on the television series Happy Days (1974–1984), a role for which he was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Series, Miniseries or Television Film.

Williams has since become a prominent television director, working on programs such as Melrose Place (1992–1999), Beverly Hills, 90210 (1990–2000), Sabrina the Teenage Witch (1996–2003), Lizzie McGuire (2001–2004), and The Secret Life of the American Teenager (2008–2013) In 1972, Williams portrayed Potsie Weber in a segment of the comedy-anthology series Love, American Style titled "Love and the Happy Days", which also introduced Richie Cunningham (Ron Howard), Richie's mother Marion (Marion Ross), and other characters who were spun off into the television series Happy Days. (Only Williams, Howard, and Ross reprised their roles). The new series' first season, during which Williams received second billing after Howard, was centered mainly on Richie and Potsie. Eventually, as breakout character Arthur "Fonzie" Fonzarelli (Henry Winkler) and Richie's mother, father, and sister became more popular, Potsie was joined by Ralph Malph (Don Most, who was merely a side character in season one), and Potsie and Ralph became inseparable. Unlike Howard and Most, Williams was one of the few to remain through the entire run of the series, although his appearances became less frequent in later seasons. In some episodes, Richie, Potsie, and Ralph formed a band combo that performed at Arnold's Drive-In and other places. As Potsie, Williams actually sang lead vocals for the group. Williams' first wife, Lorrie Mahaffey, portrayed Potsie's girlfriend, Jennifer, in later seasons. In 1977, during his run on "Happy Days" Williams recorded and released a single, "Deeply" which peaked at #93 on the Hot 100 After Happy Days, Williams began a much more prolific career as a television director, starting with short programs for adolescent-age children, including afterschool specials "No Greater Gift" (1985) and "The Drug Knot" (1986), and TV-movie Lone Star Kid (1986). He has gone on to direct many episodes for a variety of television series, including The Pretender, Beverly Hills, 90210, Melrose Place, seaQuest 2032, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager, Xena: Warrior Princess, Hercules: The Legendary Journeys, The Secret Life of the American Teenager, Sabrina the Teenage Witch and Charmed. He also directed several episodes of the TV series 7th Heaven. Despite his success as a director and producer, Williams has occasionally returned to his work on Happy Days in retrospective ways. He played himself in a 1996 Happy Days-themed Boy Meets World episode (which also featured former castmates Tom Bosley and Pat Morita).While directing a 2003 episode of Sabrina the Teenage Witch titled "Sabrina in Wonderland", he appeared as Potsie in a fantasy sequence. He also joined his fellow Happy Days cast members for two reunion specials: The Happy Days Reunion Special (1992) and Happy Days: 30th Anniversary Reunion (2005). Williams initially objected to footage of Potsie appearing in Weezer's 1994 music video Buddy Holly, which was set in Arnold's Drive-In from Happy Days, but he later relented. Williams is also a businessman. In 1987, fellow Happy Days cast member Al Molinaro and he opened a chain of diners called Big Al's; Williams is the author of Singing to a Bulldog: From Happy Days to Hollywood Director, and the Unlikely Mentor Who Got Me There.

Billy Van Zandt
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Billy Van Zandt is an American playwright and actor, and the author of the best-selling TV memoir Get in the Car, Jane (Adventures in the TV Wasteland).

Van Zandt is the co-author and star of the Off-Broadway plays You've Got Hate Mail, Silent Laughter, Drop Dead!, The Boomer Boys Musical, and 21 other theatrical plays written with Jane Milmore, including A Night at the Nutcracker, Wrong Window, and summer stock perennial Love, Sex, and the I.R.S. Billy also wrote The Property Known as Garland for Adrienne Barbeau, which ran Off-Broadway at the Actor's Playhouse in 2006. Van Zandt was nominated for an Emmy Award for his television special I Love Lucy: The Very First Show, and won People's Choice and NAACP Image Awards for his work on the Martin Lawrence comedy Martin and a Prism Multi-Cultural Award for his work on TV's The Hughleys. Along with partner Jane Milmore, he created and/or developed television's The Wayans Bros. for Shawn Wayans and Marlon Wayans, Suddenly Susan for Brooke Shields, Bless This House for Andrew Dice Clay, and Daddy Dearest for Don Rickles and Richard Lewis. In addition to starring in his own plays, he has had roles as Bob, one of the sailing teenagers, in Jaws 2 (1978), an alien Starfleet ensign in Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979), a military school cadet in the 1981 film Taps, and a mobster wannabe in the 1999 film A Wake in Providence, which he also co-wrote. On television, he was a regular cast member on the second season of ABC's Anything but Love. He was writer and guest star in the 1990 Valerie Bertinelli series Sydney.

Bonnie Bartlett
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Bonnie Bartlett is an American actress. Her career spans seven decades, with her first major role being on a 1950s daytime drama, Love of Life. She is best known for her role as Ellen Craig on the medical drama series St. Elsewhere. She and her husband, actor William Daniels, who played her fictional husband Dr. Mark Craig, won the 1986 Emmy Awards on the same night, becoming the first married couple to accomplish the feat since Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne in 1965.

Bartlett studied acting with Lee Strasberg, and first got her start in television playing the heroine "Vanessa Dale Raven" on the soap opera Love of Life from 1955 to 1959, replacing actress Peggy McCay. She also had a previous role on the program, in which she briefly played the character of Ellie Crown, a role which was played for several years by Hildy Parks. She then moved on to nighttime roles in the 1960s. Her most widely known role was as Ellen Craig on St. Elsewhere. Initially an infrequently recurring character, she took on greater prominence in the 1984–1985 season when the storyline included Ellen and Mark's marital problems. The storyline deepened in the next season when their son was killed and they had to raise their granddaughter. Bartlett won back-to-back Emmys, and was made a contract player. Further difficult material included Ellen and Mark's divorce and slow reconciliation following the loss of their granddaughter in a custody dispute with her birth mother. For many years Bartlett accepted only small guest appearances on such programs as The Golden Girls, Gunsmoke, The Rockford Files, and The Waltons, as well as a recurring role as Grace Snider Edwards on Little House on the Prairie from 1974 to 1977. Her acting career picked up considerably in the 1980s, including the miniseries V and North and South: Book II. Bartlett and husband William Daniels made Emmy Awards history in 1986 when they became just the second real-life married couple to win acting awards on the same night. Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne first accomplished the feat in 1965.[6] Bartlett and Daniels won for their portrayals of Dr. Mark and Mrs. Ellen Craig on the TV series St. Elsewhere. They later acted together again when she played a college dean who employed her husband's character, in a season of Daniels's ABC series Boy Meets World, and their characters later married.[citation needed] When St. Elsewhere ended in 1988, Bartlett's career moved to a wide variety of guest-starring appearances, including major roles on Wiseguy as a tough and corrupt matriarch of a sewage business; as Andrea Drey, Secretary General of the United Earth Oceans Organization (UEO) on seaQuest DSV; on Home Improvement as Lucille Taylor (Tim "The Tool Man" Taylor's mother); and on ER as Ruth Katherine Greene.

Brinke Stevens
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After earning a Masters Degree in oceanography, Brinke has been involved in the film business since 1981 with her debut in Roger Corman's "Slumber Party Massacre". Since then, she has appeared in 230 movies, many of them fantasy and horror, earning her the title of Scream Queen.

She’s been featured in numerous documentaries such as "The Psycho Legacy” and “ Exploit This! The History of Cult Cinema". Brinke was Executive Editor at “Weird Tales” magazine; wrote a sci fi novel, "Dangerous Toys”; and published her own comic book series "Brinke of Destruction". She has recorded dozens of audio books and radio plays, co-produced two horror documentaries ("Shock Cinema" and "Something to Scream About”), and also wrote and directed a psychological horror film, "Personal Demons” (2022).

Carl Gottlieb
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Carl Gottlieb (born March 18, 1938) is an American screenwriter, actor, comedian, and executive. He is best known for co-writing the screenplay for Jaws (1975) and its first two sequels, as well as directing the 1981 film Caveman.

He began writing comedy for TV, contributing to The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour for which he won an Emmy Award in 1969, The Music Scene, The Bob Newhart Show, All in the Family, and The Odd Couple. He also appeared on camera on Ken Berry's Wow Show variety summer television program in 1972. Minor acting roles have included Robert Altman's M*A*S*H and the film Clueless. Gottlieb also cowrote David Crosby's two autobiographies, 1989's Long Time Gone and 2006's Since Then. Gottlieb was hired as an actor to appear as Harry Meadows, the editor of the local newspaper, in Jaws. He was hired by his friend, Steven Spielberg, to redraft the script, adding more dimensions to the characters, particularly humor. His redrafts reduced the role of Meadows (who still appears in the Town Hall corridor and the Tiger Shark scene). He wrote a book, The Jaws Log, about the notoriously difficult production of the film. Bryan Singer has referred to it as being "like a little movie director bible". He was enlisted under similar circumstances to work on the Jaws 2 screenplay. He co-wrote the screenplays for The Jerk, in which he played Iron Balls McGinty, and Jaws 3-D. Gottlieb contributes to Jaws related activities, such as interviews (including the documentary The Shark Is Still Working) and attended JawsFest on Martha's Vineyard in June 2005. Gottlieb joined the Writers Guild of America in 1968 and became interested in Guild politics and with a desire to serve fellow writers following writers' strikes in the 1970s and 1981. He was elected to the Board of Directors in 1983, and re-elected for numerous terms thereafter, including two stints as vice-president (1991–1994). He was again appointed VP of the Writers Guild of America, West in 2004 and served until the following year. In September 2011, he was elected as WGA-West secretary-treasurer.

Charlotte Stewart
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Charlotte Stewart is an American film and television actress Stewart is most famous for her role as the school teacher Miss Beadle on Little House on the Prairie and her work with director David Lynch.

Stewart graduated from the Pasadena Playhouse. Her first acting job was in the 1960 episode "The Glass Cage" on The Loretta Young Show. She has guest-starred on many television series ranging from Bonanza to The Office and the recurring role of Betty Briggs on Twin Peaks.[2] She was also a prolific TV commercial actress.Her notable film appearances include Eraserhead and Tremors.[2] In 1961, she met her first husband, Tim Considine, when she played Agnes Finley in the season-one episode "Deadline" of My Three Sons.

Clark Brandon
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Clark Brandon is an American actor. His most notable roles were as Max Merlin's apprentice Zachary Rogers in the CBS series Mr. Merlin, as Chris Richards on ABC's "Out of the Blue," and as Sean Fitzpatrick, the older brother, in the CBS series The Fitzpatricks. He also starred with Jim Varney in the 1989 comedy film, Fast Food.

Brandon also directed three films: Dark Secrets (1992), Skeeter (1993) and The Last Road (1997)

David Moscow
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David Moscow (born November 14, 1974) is an American actor, producer He is best known for his role as the young Josh Baskin in the 1988 film Big and as David in the 1992 musical film Newsies.

In 1988, Moscow played the young Josh Baskin in Big, in which his character was magically transformed into an adult played by Tom Hanks. Moscow landed the role of David Jacobs in the 1992 filmed version of the musical Newsies, co-starring opposite Christian Bale Moscow also appears in a leading role opposite Jessica Alba in the film Honey and has starred on several network television series including Zoe, Duncan, Jack & Jane. He was also featured on the television series Seinfeld as the character Lomez Jr in the episode "The Van Buren Boys". He has also appeared in leading roles on Broadway, including Artie in the production What's Wrong with This Picture at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre Moscow ran A Theater Co. in New York alongside actors Tom Everett Scott and Michael Kelly. Moscow also co-developed and co-produced Lin-Manuel Miranda's first production of In the Heights with his ex-fiance, actress Kerry Washington.

Dean Butler
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Dean Butler is a Canadian American actor. His career as an actor started with a small part on the TV series The Streets of San Francisco His first major role was in the 1978 TV movie Forever, based on Judy Blume's novel of the same title. Butler is best known for his portrayal of Almanzo Wilder on the NBC family drama Little House on the Prairie, which was based on the classic Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder. He appeared in the final four seasons of the show, the spin-off show Little House: A New Beginning, and the three post-series TV movies.After Little House ended, he played Jeff "Moondoggie" Griffin in the TV series The New Gidget and Buffy’s dad, Hank Summers, on Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

During the 1980s and 1990s, Butler was a guest star on various television series, including Murder, She Wrote, Who's the Boss?, The Love Boat, and JAG. He co-starred with the late Gary Coleman in The Kid with the 200 I.Q.. He appeared in the movies Desert Hearts and The Final Goal.

Dee Dee Benrey
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Dee Dee Benrey is an actress, known for The Warriors (1979)

Dee Dee Benrey is an actress, known for The Warriors (1979)

Dennis Christopher
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Dennis Christopher is an American actor. He is best known for his roles in Breaking Away (1979), Fade to Black (1980), It (1990), Chariots of Fire (1981), and Django Unchained (2012). He has appeared in nearly 40 movies and made-for-TV movies since 1975.

A chance encounter in 1972 with Federico Fellini, who was filming in Rome at the time, led to the director casting Christopher in the uncredited role of "The Hippie" in his movie Roma After that, Christopher worked as an assistant to the fashion designer Halston. Christopher's breakthrough role was as Dave Stohler in the coming-of-age classic Breaking Away (1979). His performance won him the BAFTA Award for Most Promising Newcomer and the Youth in Film Award for Best Juvenile Actor in a Motion Picture, as well as garnering a Golden Globe nomination. Christopher's other roles include American track star Charlie Paddock in Chariots of Fire (1981), as well as tragic film-buff psychopath Eric Binford in Fade to Black (1980), Damon in The Falling (1985), Nathan Flowers in A Sinful Life (1989) and Leech in Plughead Rewired: Circuitry Man II (1994). Television roles include "Jack of All Trades" in the Profiler TV series, Eddie Kaspbrak in Stephen King's It (1990), Desmond Floyd in Jake Speed (1986) and in the HBO series Deadwood. Christopher has guest starred in two Star Trek episodes: the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "The Search (Part II)" and the Star Trek: Enterprise episode "Detained". He guest-starred as the demon-sorcerer Cyvus Vail in three episodes of Angel. He reunited with his Breaking Away "father" Paul Dooley, playing Dooley's son for a third time, in a 2003 episode of Law & Order: Criminal Intent. The two had first played father and son in Robert Altman's A Wedding (1978). In December 2006, he played Dr. Martin Ruber in the Sci Fi Channel miniseries The Lost Room. Christopher was cast as Leonide Moguy in Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained (2012). He learned through his agent that the screenplay had been re-written to accommodate him. Furthermore, Tarantino later told Christopher that he had seen every one of his films the week that they were released.

Don Most
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Don Most is an American actor and singer, best known for his role as Ralph Malph on the television series Happy Days.

Most played jokester Ralph on Happy Days, appearing up until the eighth season and then in the final season in a guest role. Most has appeared in other film and television work. Film credits include Leo and Loree (1980), EDtv (1999), Planting Melvin (2005), and The Great Buck Howard (2008). He also made the regular round of guest appearances on TV shows like Emergency!, CHiPs, Baywatch, The Love Boat, Sliders, Star Trek: Voyager, Diagnosis: Murder, ‘’Yes, Dear’’, and Glee. He also made an appearance on Charles in Charge, alongside his former Happy Days co-star, Scott Baio. He plays a man who has just won the lottery and, as part of the cameo joke, he runs up to Baio and waving the winning ticket shouts, "It looks like happy days are here again!" (He also receives several looks from Baio that suggests familiarity throughout the episode.) He is sometimes credited as "Donny Most." Most performed as a voice actor on several Saturday morning cartoon series. Among these roles were: Ralph Malph on The Fonz and the Happy Days Gang (1980); Eric the Cavalier in Dungeons & Dragons (1983); and Stiles on Teen Wolf (1986–1989). Most had a cameo as himself in the fifth season Family Guy episode "It Takes a Village Idiot, and I Married One" in 2007.

Donna Wilkes
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Donna Wilkes is an American actress. She began her career as a child actor in commercials before making her feature film debut in Jaws 2 (1978). She subsequently had a supporting role in Almost Summer (1978), followed by lead roles in the horror films Schizoid (1980) and Blood Song (1982). She also appeared in several television programs, including the soap opera Days of Our Lives (1982–1983), portraying Pamela Prentiss. She portrayed Diane Alder in the short-lived sitcom Hello, Larry (1979), a role she reprised in a spin-off episode of Diff'rent Strokes.

Wilkes is perhaps best known for her starring role in the thriller Angel (1984), in which she portrayed a preparatory student in Los Angeles who lives a double life as a prostitute by night. Her other credits include the horror film Grotesque (1988), opposite Linda Blair and Tab Hunter, and guest-starring roles on the series Dragnet (1989) and FBI: The Untold Stories (1991). Wilkes abandoned her acting career in the early 1990s after the birth of her daughter. She returned to acting in 2013, appearing in the independent films My Stepbrother Is a Vampire!?! and 90210 Shark Attack (2014). Her first role was the part of Jackie Peters in the 1978 Universal Pictures film Jaws 2. That same year, she starred as Meredith in Almost Summer, which earned her a Screen Actors Guild (SAG) card. At around age 18, she married 39-year-old actor Billy Gray, known for his work on Father Knows Best. The marriage soon ended in divorce. In 1980, Wilkes portrayed the mentally-unstable daughter of a psychologist (played by Klaus Kinski) in the horror film Schizoid. She subsequently starred in the Oregon-shot slasher film Blood Song (1982) opposite Frankie Avalon, playing a disabled young woman stalked by a maniacal killer with whom she has a telepathic connection. Wilkes had a central role as Pamela Prentiss on the soap opera Days of Our Lives from 1983 to 1984. She subsequently gained international attention for her leading role in the cult sexploitation film Angel, in which she played Molly "Angel" Stewart, a high school honor student by day, and a prostitute by night, opposite Cliff Gorman, Susan Tyrrell, Dick Shawn, and Rory Calhoun. The film spawned three unsuccessful sequels in which Wilkes had no involvement. Wilkes was 22 at the time she played the 15-year-old character. To prepare for the role, she spent time in halfway houses and rehabilitation centers in Los Angeles Released by New World Pictures in January 1984, Angel was a box-office hit, grossing $17.5 million in the United States.

Ed Begley Jr.
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Edward James Begley Jr. (born September 16, 1949) is an American actor and environmental activist. Begley has appeared in hundreds of films, television shows, and stage performances. He played Dr. Victor Ehrlich on the television series St. Elsewhere (1982–1988). The role earned him six consecutive Primetime Emmy Award nominations and a Golden Globe Award nomination.

Equally prolific in cinema, Begley's films include Stay Hungry (1976), Blue Collar (1978), An Officer and a Gentleman (1982), This Is Spinal Tap (1984), The Accidental Tourist (1988), She-Devil (1989), The Pagemaster (1994), Batman Forever (1995), Pineapple Express (2008), Whatever Works (2009), What's Your Number? (2011), Ghostbusters (2016) and CHiPS (2017). He is a recurring cast member in the mockumentaries of Christopher Guest and Eugene Levy, including Best in Show (2000), A Mighty Wind (2003).

Edward Furlong
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Edward Furlong is an American actor. He won Saturn and MTV Movie Awards for his breakthrough performance at age 13 as John Connor in James Cameron's Terminator 2: Judgment Day; which was followed by a mini-sequel, short attraction film T2-3D: Battle Across Time co-directed and co-written by Cameron with the same main cast.

In 1992, he gave an Independent Spirit Award-nominated turn opposite Jeff Bridges in American Heart, and earned a second Saturn Award nomination for his work in Pet Sematary Two. He won a Young Artist Award for his performance alongside Kathy Bates in A Home of Our Own (1993) and appeared in Before and After (1996) with Meryl Streep and Liam Neeson Furlong received acclaim for his starring roles in the 1998 motion pictures Pecker, co-starring Christina Ricci, and American History X, co-starring Edward Norton. He had significant roles in the comedy Detroit Rock City (1999) and the crime drama Animal Factory (2000) In 1991, Furlong began his film career as John Connor in Terminator 2: Judgment Day, a role that earned him an MTV Movie Award for Best Breakthrough Role and a Saturn Award for best young actor. He was discovered for the part by casting director Mali Finn while visiting the Pasadena Boys and Girls Club in September 1990. He followed this role with a string of moderately successful high-profile films and independent films, sharing the screen with Meryl Streep and Liam Neeson in Before and After (1996); Tim Roth, Maximilian Schell and Vanessa Redgrave in Little Odessa (1995); Jeff Bridges in American Heart (1993); and Anthony Edwards and Clancy Brown in Pet Sematary Two (1992). In 1993, he was featured in Aerosmith's music video for "Livin' on the Edge". He played the lead role of Michael Brower, a horror and videogame-obsessed teen in the sci-fi horror film Brainscan (1994). In 1995, he starred in the film adaptation of Truman Capote's The Grass Harp. He reprised his role as John Connor in the 1996 theme park ride T2-3D: Battle Across Time alongside Linda Hamilton, Arnold Schwarzenegger and Robert Patrick. In 1998, he starred in American History X alongside Edward Norton and appeared in his first comedy role in Pecker, directed by John Waters. Of his title role in Pecker, Furlong stated, "It's true most of the characters that I've played so far are kind of like suicidal. Really dark roles, which I like. But I wanted to do something different and John gave me a chance to do that." In 1998, he starred in the film Detroit Rock City. During filming, he met Natasha Lyonne whom he then dated. He played a young convict in Steve Buscemi's film Animal Factory (2000). Furlong's career and stardom declined considerably after 2000, with most of his subsequent films being released straight to DVD. In 2001 he took a role in I Cavalieri che fecero l'impresa aka The Knights of the Quest, a little-seen film by Italian filmmaker Pupi Avati. Furlong was expected to play John Connor again in Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (2003); however, Nick Stahl was cast just before filming began He later elaborated to have had a deal to reprise his role and was removed after the producers discovered his drug addiction. In 2004, he appeared in a music video for Metallica's "The Unnamed Feeling", and played Jimmy in the low budget independent film Jimmy & Judy (2004), during which time he met Rachael Bella. The two became romantically involved and later married. He played the lead in The Crow series' fourth film The Crow: Wicked Prayer (2005), alongside David Boreanaz and Tara Reid, which was planned for a theatrical release but upon release was widely panned by critics and audiences and was released to DVD after one week in limited theaters. He appeared in Night of the Demons, the 2009 remake of the 1988 horror classic, which was shot in New Orleans and released straight to DVD. In 2006 and again in 2010, he appeared in five episodes of the television program CSI: NY as Shane Casey. Furlong appeared in two scenes of Seth Rogen's film The Green Hornet (2011). Next he starred in This Is Not a Movie, an English-language Mexican film written and directed by Olallo Rubio and co-starring Peter Coyote and Edi Gathegi. He was featured as Fixer in the crowdfunded pilot Star Trek: Renegades. In 2019, James Cameron confirmed that Furlong would be returning to reprise his role of John Connor. It was later reported that his facial likeness would be used via CGI in Terminator: Dark Fate (2019) with Jude Collie as a CGI stand-in and he was involved in one day of filming for facial capture performance, as John Connor was killed off in the opening scene.

Ellen Bry
FIRST CONVENTION APPEARANCE!
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Ellen Bry starred as series regular 'Nurse Shirley Daniels' in 52 episodes of "St. Elsewhere". She began her acting career in New York, appearing in off-Broadway plays, soap operas and TV commercials. When Ellen was cast in an acting role on Kojak, she literally fell into stunt work when the stunt coordinator encouraged her to perform her own stunts. Stunt work proved to be an exciting and lucrative side hustle, eventually leading to Ellen being cast as Margot Kidder‘s stunt double in “Superman” and in "Superman II: The Donner Cut". “The Amazing Spider-Man" TV series brought Ellen to Hollywood when she was cast as series regular ‘Julie Masters’.

Dozens of guest star and recurring roles followed on TV series like “CHiPS", "Dallas", “Hotel”, "The Love Boat", "MacGyver", "Murder She Wrote", "Baywatch", “Chicago Hope”, “Boston Legal”, “The Practice”, Monk”, “The Closer”, "Dexter" and "Castle" and in such TV movies as “Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders”, “The Indestructible Man” and “Starflight”. She guest-starred in "Star Trek: The Next Generation" as ‘Dr. Farallon' in “The Quality of Life" episode. Ellen has also had roles in such feature films as "Deep Impact", “Mission Impossible III", “Bye, Bye, Love” and “The Lost and Found Family”. Ellen lives in Los Angeles and continues to act in quality work to this day.

France Nuyen
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is a French actress, model, and psychological counsellor.

Nuyen became a motion picture actress in 1958. In her first role, she played Liat, daughter of Bloody Mary (played by Juanita Hall) in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical South Pacific.[3] Later that year, she was cast in the lead role of the Broadway adaptation of the novel The World of Suzie Wong, opposite William Shatner.[4][3] She originally was cast to star in the film adaptation of The World of Suzie Wong, but was replaced by Nancy Kwan. She worked again with William Shatner in the third-season episode "Elaan of Troyius" of Star Trek, playing the title character Elaan of Troyius (1968), and again in an episode of Kung Fu (1974). Nuyen appeared in films including The Last Time I Saw Archie (1961) Satan Never Sleeps (1962), A Girl Named Tamiko (1962), Diamond Head (1963), Dimension 5 (1966), Battle for the Planet of the Apes (1973) and The Joy Luck Club (1993). In 1978, she guest-starred with Peter Falk and Louis Jourdan in the Columbo episode "Murder Under Glass". In 1986, she joined the cast of St. Elsewhere as Dr. Paulette Kiem, remaining until the series ended in 1988. Her last known credit is for the romantic drama The American Standards (2008).

Gary Springer
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Gary's first career was as an actor with film appearances including "Dog Day Afternoon," "Jaws 2," "Small Circle of Friends" and "Law and Disorder."

Gary's first career was as an actor with film appearances including "Dog Day Afternoon," "Jaws 2," "Small Circle of Friends" and "Law and Disorder."

George Hamilton
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George Hamilton is an American film and television actor. His notable films include Home from the Hill (1960), By Love Possessed (1961), Light in the Piazza (1962), Your Cheatin' Heart (1964), Once Is Not Enough (1975), Love at First Bite (1979), Zorro, The Gay Blade (1981), The Godfather Part III (1990), Doc Hollywood (1991), 8 Heads in a Duffel Bag (1997), Hollywood Ending (2002) and The Congressman (2016). For his debut performance in Crime and Punishment U.S.A. (1959), Hamilton won a Golden Globe Award and was nominated for a BAFTA Award. He has received one additional BAFTA nomination and two additional Golden Globe nominations.

Hamilton began his film career in 1958, and although he has a substantial body of work in film and television, he is perhaps most famous for his debonair style and his perpetual suntan. Bo Derek wrote in her autobiography that "there was an ongoing contest between John [Derek] and George Hamilton as to who was tanner." Hamilton's first roles were in TV. He appeared on such shows as The Veil (playing an Indian), The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, The Donna Reed Show and Cimarron City. His first film role was a lead, Crime and Punishment U.S.A. (1959), directed by Denis Sanders. Although shot in 1958 it was not released until the following year. However the film was seen by Vincente Minnelli who thought Hamilton would be ideal for the younger son in Home from the Hill (1960), a Southern melodrama with Robert Mitchum. Hamilton was duly cast and the film was popular. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer signed him to a long-term contract. MGM cast Hamilton in support of Natalie Wood and Robert Wagner in the melodrama All the Fine Young Cannibals (1960) which flopped at the box office. Hamilton's next film was far more popular, the beach party comedy Where the Boys Are (1960). This was a hit and remains one of his best known movies. Hamilton wanted to do more serious material, however, so he appeared in the lower budgeted Angel Baby (1961), a drama about an evangelist, for Allied Artists. It had minimal commercial or critical impact. For United Artists, he supported Lana Turner in a melodrama, By Love Possessed (1961). MGM tried to change his image by putting him in a Western, A Thunder of Drums (1961) alongside Richard Boone; the film was mildly popular. Hamilton lobbied hard for the role of the Italian husband in Light in the Piazza (1962), another melodrama, with Olivia de Havilland. The film lost money but Hamilton received excellent notices. It was shot in Italy, and MGM kept Hamilton in that country to play a role in Two Weeks in Another Town (1962), an unsuccessful attempt to repeat the success of The Bad and the Beautiful (1952). Hamilton had an excellent part in The Victors (1963), an anti-war drama from Carl Foreman. It was a box office disappointment but was critically acclaimed. Hamilton had another good role in Act One (1963), playing Moss Hart, but the movie was poorly received. He guest starred on episodes of Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre and Burke's Law. After making a cameo in Looking for Love (1964), Hamilton appeared in another biopic, Your Cheatin' Heart (1964), playing Hank Williams. The movie was not widely seen but had its fans and Hamilton's performance received some praise. He guest starred on episodes of The Rogues and Ben Casey. Hamilton went to Mexico to support Jeanne Moreau and Brigitte Bardot in Viva Maria! (1965). It was directed by Louis Malle who cast Hamilton on the strength of his performance in Two Weeks in Another Town. Malle said, "he was a personal choice and I am happy with him.... He's more interested in being in the social columns – I don't understand – when he should be one of the greatest of his generation."[4] The film was popular in Europe, but less so in the US. Hamilton made a movie in France, That Man George (1965), and appeared in a production of A Farewell to Arms (1966) on TV, opposite Vanessa Redgrave. He returned to MGM to make a romantic comedy with Sandra Dee, Doctor, You've Got to Be Kidding! (1967), which was mildly popular. At Columbia he co-starred with Glenn Ford in a Western A Time for Killing (1967), originally directed by Roger Corman then Phil Karlson. Hamilton played a cat burglar in MGM's Jack of Diamonds (1967). It was produced by Sandy Howard who said Hamilton was "a hot commodity these days" because he was dating Lyndon Johnson's daughter. Reports put his fee around this time at $100,000 a movie. He was drafted into the army but received a 3-A deferral notice on the grounds he was the sole financial provider for his mother. (Hamilton's draft deferment was highly controversial at the time because it was thought that his relationship with the president's daughter gave him preferential treatment In 1968 Hamilton made a science fiction film for George Pal at MGM, The Power. Hamilton went into television in 1969, supporting Lana Turner in the all-star ABC series Harold Robbins' The Survivors (1969–70) When the show was canceled in January 1970, Hamilton went into Paris 7000 (1970). He portrayed a trouble shooter for the US State Department in Paris helping US citizens. This series was canceled in March 1970. He starred in the TV films Togetherness (1970) and The Last of the Powerseekers, a 1971 compilation of two episodes of Harold Robbins' The Survivors. In 1979 he appeared in surprise hit Love at First Bite, in which he showed a flair for comedy, which was the story of Count Dracula's pursuit of a young Manhattanite model, played by Susan Saint James. The film included such scenes as Dracula and his conquest dancing to "I Love the Nightlife" at a disco. The film's box-office success created a popularity surge for Hamilton, who also served as executive producer. He returned to TV for The Seekers (1979) and The Great Cash Giveaway Getaway (1979) then he did a Love at First Bite style comedy, 1981's Zorro, The Gay Blade, which he produced. However, Zorro was not as popular as Love at First Bite and film leads dried up quickly. He focused on television: Malibu (1983) and Two Fathers' Justice (1985). In the mid-1980s, Hamilton starred in the sixth season of the ABC Aaron Spelling-produced nighttime television serial Dynasty. He supported Joan Collins in the miniseries Monte Carlo (1986) and had the lead in a short lived series Spies (1987). He supported Elizabeth Taylor in Poker Alice (1987). A break for Hamilton came in 1990 when Francis Ford Coppola cast him as the Corleone family's lawyer in The Godfather Part III. For the second time, he portrayed a murderer on the television series Columbo, starring as the host of a TV true-crime show in the 1991 episode "Caution: Murder Can Be Hazardous to Your Health." He had previously been in the 1975 episode "A Deadly State of Mind". Hamilton had small roles in Doc Hollywood (1991), Once Upon a Crime (1992) and Amore! (1993) and guest starred on Diagnosis: Murder and Dream On. He went to Germany to make Das Paradies am Ende der Berge (1993) and did Two Fathers: Justice for the Innocent (1994), Vanished (1995), and Playback (1996), as well as guest starring on the shows Bonnie, Hart to Hart and The Guilt. He was in Meet Wally Sparks (1997), 8 Heads in a Duffel Bag (1997), and the miniseries Rough Riders (1997), where he portrayed William Randolph Hearst. With his matinee-idol looks it was sometimes noted that Hamilton physically resembled Warren Beatty. Beatty's political satire Bulworth (1998) contained a running gag about this with Hamilton appearing as himself in a brief cameo. Hamilton had a regular role on the short lived TV series Jenny (1997). He was in Casper Meets Wendy (1998), P.T. Barnum (1999) and She's Too Tall (1999). He was a semi-regular celebrity guest on the 1998-99 syndicated version of Match Game.

Geri Reischl
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Geri Reischl is an American actress and singer. She was a child actress in the 1970s, most notably as Jan Brady on the variety show The Brady Bunch Hour, and appeared in various television commercials.

Reischl's first appearance was at the age of six playing Gretl in a production of The Sound of Music, starring Patrice Munsel, at the Melodyland Theatre in Anaheim, California. There, she was discovered by a talent agent who signed her and got her parts in two commercials. She was then signed to an exclusive contract with Mattel Toys until she was retired in 1971 by the company at the age of 11. Her last Mattel commercial was for Mattel's Rock Flowers series of fashion dolls, and according to Reischl the series' 'Heather' doll was patterned after her likeness During her career, Geri appeared in over 40 commercials. From 1979 to 1983, she appeared in a series of Wizard of Oz-themed commercials for the breakfast cereal Crispy Wheats-n-Raisins, in which she played Dorothy. On television, Reischl appeared on Gunsmoke, The Interns, Apple's Way and The Bold Ones. In addition, Geri filmed a television pilot with Rene Simard entitled Rene and the Proteens. She went on to star in two low budget splatter films: The Brotherhood of Satan (1971) and I Dismember Mama (1974). The Brady Bunch Variety Hour Reischl is best known for portraying Jan Brady in nine episodes of The Brady Bunch Hour during the 1976–77 television season Her appearances as Jan have been referred to as 'Fake Jan'. Reischl has embraced this fan-created moniker as a badge of honor and her personal brand She was selected from over 1,500 girls, including Kathy Richards, who auditioned for the role in 1976 and supposedly came in second place for the part Reischl had not watched the original The Brady Bunch show at the time, since she was too busy with schoolwork, playing and singing with her band, and acting in television commercials and movies to watch much television. The rest of the cast immediately welcomed her and made her feel at ease on the show. After The Brady Bunch Hour, Reischl went back to high school and after graduating she held a job in a doctor's office while continuing to audition. Reischl was given the role of Blair Warner in the television pilot Garrett's Girls (later renamed The Facts of Life), but was forced to give it up due to her contract with General Mills Music career Reischl sang and played guitar in a California band by the name of Sand Dabs from 1974 to 1976. She went on to perform at U.S.O. clubs, Magic Mountain, Knotts Berry Farm, the Harrah's Club, and with Marty Robbins at the Palomino Club of North Hollywood. She was one of Sammy Davis, Jr.'s "Kids" in his Lake Tahoe night club act, and also performed with Red Skelton. In the summer of 1976, Reischl toured the United States and Montreal doing an act with Canadian singer René Simard. Because of her interest in country music she made a guest appearance on the show Pop! Goes the Country in 1977 that was filmed at the Grand Ole Opry.

Gigi Vorgan
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Gigi Vorgan is an American writer and producer who appeared in numerous feature films and television projects before joining her husband Dr. Gary Small to cowrite iBrain, The Memory Prescription, The Longevity Bible, and The Memory Bible.

She worked as a child actress, then she went on hiatus, and when she was 18 years old she got a call from her agent to go down to Universal and meet the producer and director of Jaws 2. She also worked in Rain Man (1988) and Red Dawn (1984).

Gloria Hendry
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Gloria Hendry is an American actress and former model Hendry is best known for her roles in films from the 1970s, most notably: portraying Rosie Carver in 1973's James Bond film Live and Let Die and Helen Bradley in the blaxploitation film Black Caesar, and the sequel, Hell Up in Harlem.

Hendry worked as a Playboy Bunny at the New York Playboy Club from 1965 until 1972. In 1968, Hendry received her first acting role in Sidney Poitier's film For Love of Ivy, followed by a small role in the 1970 film The Landlord. In 1973, Hendry portrayed the Bond girl Rosie Carver in the James Bond film Live and Let Die. In that film, she became the first African American woman to become romantically involved with 007; Trina Parks, who played a nemesis to Bond rather than a love interest in Diamonds Are Forever (the previous Bond film) is considered to be the first Black Bond girl Hendry later starred in several 1970s blaxploitation films, including Across 110th Street (1972), Slaughter's Big Rip-Off (1973), and both the 1973 films Black Caesar and its sequel Hell Up in Harlem. She also portrayed the martial arts expert, Sydney, in Black Belt Jones (1974) and appeared in Savage Sisters (1974) and Bare Knuckles (1977). Her later films included the horror film Pumpkinhead II: Blood Wings (1994).

Hal Linden
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Hal Linden is an American stage and screen actor, television director and musician. Linden began his career as a big band musician and singer in the 1950s. After a stint in the United States Army, he began an acting career where he first worked in summer stock and off-Broadway productions. Linden found success on Broadway when he replaced Sydney Chaplin in the musical Bells Are Ringing. In 1971, he won a Best Actor Tony Award for his portrayal of Mayer Rothschild in the musical The Rothschilds.

In 1974, Linden landed his best-known role as the title character in the television comedy series Barney Miller. The role earned him seven Primetime Emmy Award and three Golden Globe Award nominations. During the series' run, Linden also hosted two educational series, Animals, Animals, Animals and FYI. He won two special Daytime Emmy Awards for the latter series. Linden won a third Daytime Emmy Award for a guest-starring role on CBS Schoolbreak Special in 1995. Linden has since continued his career on the stage, in films and guest-starring roles on television. He released his first album of pop and jazz standards, It's Never Too Late, in 2011. n 1974, Linden landed the starring role in the ABC television police sitcom Barney Miller. He portrayed the eponymous captain of the 12th Precinct in Greenwich Village, Manhattan, New York City. He earned seven Emmy Award nominations for his work on the series, one for each season. Linden is tied with Matt LeBlanc and John Goodman for the most Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Emmy Award nominations without ever winning. He also earned four Golden Globe Award nominations for Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy. The series aired from 1975 to 1982. Linden later said that leaving Broadway to work on Barney Miller was his most irrational act and also one of his best decisions During the run of Barney Miller, Linden served as the narrator and host of the ABC children's shows Animals, Animals, Animals and FYI. He won two Daytime Emmys for Outstanding Individual Achievement for his host work on FYI. in 1984 and 1985. After Barney Miller ended in 1982, Linden appeared in several television films, including I Do! I Do! (1982), the television adaptation of the musical of the same name, and Starflight: The Plane That Couldn't Land (1983). Also in 1982, he was the producers' first choice for the starring role of Dr. Donald Westphall in St. Elsewhere, when the role was immediately given to Ed Flanders, because he wanted to take a break from television In 1984, he costarred in the television film Second Edition. The film was intended to be a series but was not picked up by CBS. The following year, Linden portrayed studio head Jack L. Warner in the television biopic My Wicked, Wicked Ways: The Legend of Errol Flynn. In 1986, Linden returned to episodic television in the NBC series Blacke's Magic. He played the lead character, Alexander Blacke, a magician who solves mysteries with the help of his father Leonard (Harry Morgan), a retired carnival magician and sometimes confidence man. The series was canceled after 13 episodes. In 1988, he co-starred in the romantic comedy A New Life, directed by Alan Alda. In 1992, Linden tried his hand at television again with the leading role in the comedy-drama series Jack's Place. In the series, Linden portrayed Jack Evans, a retired jazz musician who ran a restaurant that was frequented by patrons who learned lessons about love. The show was often compared to The Love Boat by critics as it featured a different weekly guest star. The series premiered as a mid-season replacement but did well enough in the ratings for ABC to order additional episodes. Viewership soon declined and ABC chose to cancel the series in 1993. The next year, Linden appeared in the CBS sitcom The Boys Are Back. That series was also low rated and canceled after 18 episodes. In 1995, Linden won his third Daytime Emmy Award for his 1994 guest-starring role as Rabbi Markovitz on CBS Schoolbreak Special. In 1996, Linden had a supporting role in the television film The Colony, opposite John Ritter and June Lockhart. The role was a departure for Linden as he played the villainous head of a home owner's association of a gated community. In 1999, he had a guest role in the last The Rockford Files reunion TV movie, The Rockford Files: If It Bleeds... It Leads. He continued his career in the late 1990s and 2000s with guest roles on Touched by an Angel, The King of Queens, Gilmore Girls, Law & Order: Criminal Intent, and Hot in Cleveland. He also narrated episodes of Biography and The American Experience, and voiced the role of "Dr. Selig" on the animated series The Zeta Project. In 2002, Linden received a Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs, California, Walk of Stars.

Hersha Parady
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Hersha Parady is an American actress best known for her role of Alice Garvey in Little House on the Prairie.

Parady began her career in television with guest-appearances in Mannix, Bearcats! and The Waltons. Hersha was considered to play Caroline Ingalls in Little House on the Prairie, but lost out to Karen Grassle. Later, in 1976 episode Journey in the Spring, Paraday played Eliza Anne Ingalls, Charles' sister-in-law. Then in 1977 she was given the role of Alice Garvey in Little House on the Prairie, which she played until 1980 when her character was killed in a fire accidentally set by Albert Ingalls. After Little House on the Prairie, she made only rare appearances in television, including Kenan & Kel. She was once married to Oscar-winning producer John Peverall and had one child with him. She was friends with fellow Little House actors Katherine MacGregor, Richard Bull, and Dabbs Greer until their deaths. She was also once close to Patrick Labyorteaux who played her son Andrew Garvey and his brother Matthew Labyorteaux, who played Albert Ingalls.

Irene Tsu
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a Chinese American actress who made her debut in the film adaptation of Flower Drum Song in 1961, and has had many subsequent roles in TV and films. She was featured playing the wiki wiki girl in the Wiki wiki dollar advertising campaign for Chevron Corporation in the 1960s.

In the late 1950s. she auditioned for a dancing job in Broadway's Flower Drum Song. A staff member of the producer David Merrick's office saw the performance and auditioned her for the Broadway musical "The World of Suzie Wong" and Tsu got a part. Later Irene auditioned for choreographer Hermes Pan in the upcoming film adaptation of the musical Flower Drum Song. The choreographer Hermes Pan brought Irene to Hollywood and she was a teenage dancer in the film Flower Drum Song (1961), directed by Henry Koster. He gave her her first speaking role as a teenage prostitute in his next film, Take Her, She's Mine (1963) starring James Stewart and Sandra Dee, which started her acting career. In 1961, Tsu entered the Miss Chinatown USA beauty pageant on behalf of New York and won first place. On November 21, 1963, the evening before President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, Tsu's only appearance on Perry Mason was aired on CBS, as she played the role of defendant Juli Eng in "The Case of the Floating Stones." She made guest appearances on most of the other popular '60s-70s television shows such as I Spy, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Family Affair, Mission: Impossible, and The Wild Wild West. She was tested for, but didn't get the female lead of The Sand Pebbles. In the 1960s, Tsu met Frank Sinatra in Miami, Florida where she was filming the "Chevron Island" commercials and Sinatra was filming Tony Rome. They dated for over two years. Irene also starred in two episodes of Star Trek Voyager and played the mother to Ensign Kim Garret Wang.

Jackie Joseph
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is an American character actress, voice artist, and writer. She is best known for her role as Jackie Parker on The Doris Day Show (1971-1973) and Audrey in The Little Shop of Horrors (1960), as well as a supporting role in Gremlins (1984).

Joseph began her career as a featured performer and singer in the Billy Barnes Review of 1958, with future husband and actor Ken Berry. She was married to Berry, with whom she adopted two children (John and Kate), from May 29, 1960, until June 1976. She has since remarried, to David Lawrence. Her son John died of brain cancer in 2016 at the age of 51. Joseph's roles on television programs included Miss Oglethorpe on Run, Buddy, Run,Jackie Parker on The Doris Day Show, Sandy on The All New Popeye Hour. She was also a regular on The Bob Newhart Show (1961) and The Magic Land of Allakazam. She is also known for portraying Audrey Fulquard in the original version of The Little Shop of Horrors (1960), as well as Charlene Hensley in Hogan's Heroes (1966), Sheila Futterman in Gremlins (1984) and Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990), Mrs Kirkland in Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment (1985) and Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol (1987),[citation needed] and the voice of Melody in the animated series Josie and the Pussycats and Josie and the Pussycats in Outer Space. She played the love interest of Willie (played by Bob Denver) in the film Who's Minding the Mint? (1967). Her other film work includes roles in A Guide for the Married Man (1967), With Six You Get Eggroll (1968), The Split (1968), The Good Guys and the Bad Guys (1969), The Cheyenne Social Club (1970), Get Crazy (1983), and Small Soldiers (1998). Joseph's other television credits include The Andy Griffith Show (Season 4 Episode 17: "My Fair Ernest T. Bass" as Ramona Ankrum), The Dick Van Dyke Show (two appearances), That Girl, F Troop (Season 1 Episode 17: "Our Hero, What's His Name" as Corporal Randolph Agarn's girlfriend Betty Lou MacDonald), Hogan's Heroes (Season 1 Episode 28: "I Look Better in Basic Black" as Charlene Hemsley), McHale's Navy, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. (four appearances), Petticoat Junction (1967 episode: 'A House Divided'), CHiPs (in a two-part episode), Full House and Designing Women (as Mary Jo's mother). She also appeared for a week on the game show Match Game '74. Although she appeared only once on the 1964 sitcom My Living Dol

James Darren
SATURDAY ONLY
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Darren was discovered by talent agent and casting director Joyce Selznick after he got some photographs taken by Maurice Seymour to show potential agents: "His secretary, a woman by the name of Yvonne Bouvier, asked me if I was interested in getting into film. I said yeah, I was. She said I know someone you should meet. She set up a meeting between me and Joyce Selznick, who worked for Screen Gems. I went down to 1650 Broadway, the Brill Building. On my way to a meeting with Joyce, we just happened to get on the elevator at the same time. She kept staring at me. I never met her. She never met me. We got off at the same floor and walked to the same office. That was our meeting. Joyce brought me over to Columbia Pictures about a week later and got me a contract there."

Columbia signed Darren to a long-term contract in July 1956. A few weeks later he was filming his first film, Rumble on the Docks (1956), a low budget "B" movie produced by Sam Katzman, where Darren played the lead.Darren's appearance was well received and he got a lot of fan mail – second at the studio only to Kim Novak. Darren guest starred on an episode of TV's The Web ("Kill and Run") then Columbia gave him a support role in an "A" picture, the comedy Operation Mad Ball (1957), starring Jack Lemmon. He had support roles in two films directed by Phil Karlson: The Brothers Rico (1957), a film noir, playing the brother of Richard Conte; and Gunman's Walk (1958), a Western with Van Heflin and Tab Hunter. In between he was second billed in another movie for Katzman, The Tijuana Story (1957), although his role was relatively small. Darren was third billed in the surf film, Gidget (1959), starring Sandra Dee and Cliff Robertson, playing Moondoggie. He also sang the title track. "They were thinking about having someone do the vocal and I would lip sync", he recalled. "I told them I could do it. So we went into one of the sound stages and I sang 'Gidget'. They said, 'He sings fine,' then I did all the other songs." The film was a hit with teen audiences and so was the song. Darren wound up recording a string of pop hits for Colpix Records, the biggest of which was "Goodbye Cruel World" (#3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1961). It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc He also recorded this song in excellent Italian, as "Addio Mondo Crudele", which was very successful in Europe. Another sizeable hit was "Her Royal Majesty" (#6 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1962). He is also featured in one of the Scopitone series of pop music video jukebox films ("Because You're Mine"). Twice, in 1959 and 1961, Darren played teen idols on episodes of The Donna Reed Show He did an episode of The Lineup (1959). Darren was third billed in a series of films for Columbia: The Gene Krupa Story (1959), a biopic with Sal Mineo; All the Young Men (1960), a Korean War movie with Alan Ladd and Sidney Poitier; and Let No Man Write My Epitaph (1960) with Burl Ives and Shelley Winters, which was a sequel to Knock On Any Door (1949). He had a cameo as himself in a teen film, Because They're Young (1960), singing the title track. Darren had a supporting role in the World War II film The Guns of Navarone (1961), a huge hit at the box office. However, Darren later said "The people handling my career at that point didn't really take advantage of it." Also popular was Gidget Goes Hawaiian (1961) where Darren reprised his role as Moondoggie; he had a new Gidget (Deborah Walley) and was given top billing. Darren had a good support role in a melodrama, Diamond Head (1962) with Charlton Heston. He played Moondoggie a third time in Gidget Goes to Rome (1962) which he later said he "hated... I didn't want to do it. I thought that I'd be doing those for the rest of my life." He sang the title track for Under the Yum Yum Tree (1963). In 1963 Darren signed a seven-picture deal with Universal, starting with The Lively Set (1963) That teamed him with Pamela Tiffin, who was also in For Those Who Think Young (1964), a teen film Darren made for United Artists. He was the singing voice of Yogi Bear in the animated film, Hey There, It's Yogi Bear! (1964), on the song "Ven-e, Ven-o, Ven-a". Prior to that, he was the singing voice of his own character "Jimmy Darrock" on an episode of The Flintstones. However, the character's dialogue was provided by voice actor Lennie Weinrib. Darren guest starred on an episode of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea as an Android Omar, that was produced by Irwin Allen. Allen then cast Darren in the lead of a series, as impulsive scientist and adventurer Tony Newman on the science fiction series, The Time Tunnel (1966–1967). When the series ended, Allen shot a brief pilot for a new series starring Darren, The Man from the 25th Century, but it was not picked up. Darren then went to Europe to make Venus in Furs (1969) for Jess Franco then was reunited with Allen in City Beneath the Sea (1971). In the 1970s, Darren performed regularly in night clubs. He focused on guest starring on TV series, such as Love, American Style; S.W.A.T.; Police Woman; Black Sheep Squadron; The Feather and Father Gang; Charlie's Angels; Police Story; Hawaii Five-O; Vegas; The Love Boat; and Fantasy Island. He had a role in the TV movie, The Lives of Jenny Dolan (1975) and the film The Boss' Son (1978). In the early 1980s Darren appeared on Scruples (1981), and One Day at a Time. Later Darren had a regular role as Officer III James Corrigan on the television police drama T. J. Hooker from 1983 to 1986. "Every career has its hills and valleys", Darren said in 1983. "The most important thing is that you are happy with you. Not anybody's career, no one that I know of, has always been climbing. It always levels out and you want to make sure you have good investments and financial security and bread on the table. If projects aren't coming to you, then you seek them out and you try to develop and put projects together." He directed some episodes and launched a career as a director, notably of action-based series, including Hunter, The A-Team, Silk Stalkings, Renegade, and Nowhere Man, as well as dramas such as Beverly Hills, 90210 and Melrose Place. He continued to act on such shows as Raven. In 1998, he achieved renewed popularity as a singer through his appearances on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine in the role of holographic crooner and adviser Vic Fontaine. His role in Deep Space Nine inspired his return to singing. Many of his vocal performances on the show were re-recorded for the album This One's from the Heart (1999) The album shows Darren, a close friend of Frank Sinatra, comfortably singing in the Sinatra style. The 2001 follow-up Because of You showed similar inspiration from Tony Bennett.

Jamie Farr
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Jamie Farr is an American television and film comedian and theatre actor. He is best known for playing the cross-dressing corporal Maxwell Q. Klinger in the CBS television sitcom M*A*S*H.

He was inducted to the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1985 Farr's first film roles were in 1955 in Blackboard Jungle (credited as Jameel Farah) and as a fruit vendor in Kismet (uncredited). After this, he was drafted into the United States Army, undergoing his basic training with the 6th Infantry Division at Fort Ord, California. He served for two years, in Japan on the radio and Korea on television, making him one of three cast members of the M*A*S*H cast to have served in the U.S. military in Korea (the others being Alan Alda and Mike Farrell). Farr said Red Skelton saved his career. Farr told the story in an interview in 2011 with the Television Academy Foundation. They had met before Farr's military service, and Farr worked with Skelton as an emcee and writer on a barnstorming tour entertaining U.S. troops in Korea and Japan. After his active service, while he was still on two years of active reserve, Farr was ready to give up acting when he left the Army, because his father had died, and Farr needed to find steady work to support his mother. But Skelton hired Farr on a personal contract to write for his act, gave him hundreds of dollars in cash to send to his mother, and helped him find roles. "It was Red Skelton who really saved me and kept me in the business," Farr said. For the rest of his life, he said, Farr has worn a St. Christopher's medal given to him by Skelton. Although Farr was off to a promising start, roles were infrequent for the young actor, and he was cast as a delivery person, a post office clerk, an army store clerk, an airlines reservations agent, and as an employee at a chinchilla ranch—all small roles or bit parts. In 1958, Warner Brothers cast him as the co-pilot of a TB-25 in the Andy Griffith military comedy No Time for Sergeants, which also brought the young TV comic Don Knotts to motion pictures. Farr appeared as Thaddaeus in the 1965 film The Greatest Story Ever Told, along with minor roles in Who's Minding the Mint? and With Six You Get Eggroll. Farr got a new acting role on television when, in the late 1950s, he became a regular on The Red Skelton Show before becoming a second banana with Harvey Korman on The Danny Kaye Show. Farr also appeared on The Dick Van Dyke Show and was a regular on the gangster-comedy series The Chicago Teddy Bears (featuring Huntz Hall). By 1965 Jamie Farr appears in My Three Sons Season 5, Episode 10, "The Coffee House" as a beatnik. In 1964, he appeared in an episode of Hazel as a soon-to-be father who owned an Italian restaurant. In 1967 he appeared in Garrison's Gorillas. Farr also worked in TV commercials, including a spot for Wonder Bread (as a vendor who says, "If it isn’t fresh, I’m outta business!"). In October 1972, he was hired for one day's work as Corporal Maxwell Klinger on the M*A*S*H episode "Chief Surgeon Who?" His character wore dresses to try to convince the army that he was "crazy" and deserved a Section 8 discharge. Comedy writer and playwright Larry Gelbart has said that comedian Lenny Bruce's attempt to be released from military service in World War II by dressing in a WAVES uniform was the original inspiration for the character of Klinger on the sitcom. He was asked back for a dozen episodes in the second season, and he became a regular in the fourth. Eventually, his character gave up wearing women's clothing after the discharge of Radar O'Reilly had Klinger assuming the company clerk's position. Farr also ended the cross-dressing gag because, at the time, his young children were being teased about it. Like most of the characters on M*A*S*H, Klinger matured as the years passed. He gradually progressed from being a cross-dressing visual joke, and became a more sensitive and resourceful character. Klinger's colorful side emerged in new ways, as he used the Toledo wheeler-dealer skills he learned on the streets to circumvent Army bureaucracy on the 4077's behalf. His favorite episodes are "Officer of the Day" and "Big Mac". Farr and co-stars Harry Morgan and William Christopher spent two years starring in AfterMASH, the sequel that explored how civilian life treated their characters. While working on M*A*S*H, Farr also appeared in The Cannonball Run, Cannonball Run II, and Speed Zone, making him the only actor to have appeared in all three Cannonball Run films. Farr was a regular judge on The Gong Show in the late 1970s. He also appeared as a panelist on several other game shows, including The $25,000 Pyramid, Super Password, Body Language, Match Game-Hollywood Squares Hour, Wordplay, The $1.98 Beauty Show, The Magnificent Marble Machine, and Tattletales. He appeared in several made-for-TV movies such as Murder Can Hurt You, Return of the Rebels, and Combat Academy. He also guest-starred in Kolchak: The Night Stalker as a teacher, Mr. Burton, as well as a second-season episode of Emergency!. He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1985. In the 1990s, Farr (and Nathan Lane) played the role of Nathan Detroit in a Broadway revival of Guys and Dolls. Farr is still active in regional theater and guest-stars occasionally on television. Since 1984, he has hosted an annual women's professional golf tournament on the LPGA tour, the Jamie Farr Toledo Classic, presented by Kroger, Owens Corning, and O-I in Sylvania, Ohio. The tournament has raised over $6.5 million for local children's charities. In 1996–1997 Farr went on a North American tour with The Odd Couple, playing Oscar Madison opposite his old friend William Christopher in the role of Felix Ungar. The two had appeared in several movies before they were eventually cast together in M*A*S*H. On Memorial Day 2007, Farr hosted a multiple-episode presentation of M*A*S*H on the Hallmark Channel. The featured episodes showcased Farr's performances on the show, with Farr providing commentary during commercial intermissions. In 2007, Farr played Adam Johnson in Hallmark original movie A Grandpa for Christmas. The TV movie starred Ernest Borgnine in the role of Bert O'Riley. Farr, Chuck Woolery, and Bob Eubanks were rotating hosts of the $250,000 Game Show Spectacular at the Las Vegas Hilton until the show ended in April 2008. Farr had a recurring role on Fox's The Cool Kids.

Jason Williams
FIRST HS APPEARANCE!
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Jason Williams was a handsome and charming blonde actor who popped up in a handful of delightfully down'n'dirty drive-in exploitation features from the early 70s up until the mid 90s.

Williams achieved his greatest enduring cult cinema popularity as the titular lead character in the amusingly naughty sci-fi porno spoof "Flesh Gordon," which was the first of four films he starred in for producer Bill Osco. Williams portrayed a vicious lowlife criminal in the gritty and exciting crime/action thriller "Cop Killers," the dashing White Night in the uproariously raunchy tongue-in-cheek musical porno riot "Alice in Wonderland," and a bitter, disgruntled football player in the enjoyably trashy "Cheerleaders' Wild Weekend." Jason's other memorable roles include a greedy pimp in the scuzzy chicks-in-chains outing "Prison Girls," a jerky college frat boy jock in the entertainingly crummy sci-fi/horror hoot "Time Walker," a rugged laid-back police detective in the silly "Vampire at Midnight," and the tough undercover narc hero of the immensely fun'n'funky "Danger Zone" flicks. Moreover, Williams often also served as both writer and producer of a majority of movies he acted in. Williams produced a bunch of episodes of the Emmy-winning TV series "Lost Civilizations." His last credit to date was as a producer of the documentary "Tiger!".

Jeff Maxwell
FIRST HOLLYWOOD SHOW APPEARANCE!
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Jeff Maxwell is an American film and television actor. He is perhaps best known for playing Pvt. Igor Straminsky, a recurring character in the television series M*A*S*H He appeared in 83 episodes of the classic CBS comedy from 1973 to 1983, including the series finale Goodbye, Farewell and Amen, which aired February 28, 1983, and became the most-watched scripted broadcast in American history (a title it still holds) with over 121.6 million viewers and 50.1 million households tuning in.

Maxwell's film debut was in the acclaimed 1974 Mel Brooks comedy film Young Frankenstein. He played one of the title character's medical students. He was also featured in the 1977 sketch comedy film Kentucky Fried Movie in a solo scene titled "Feel-A-Round." The box-office success was directed by John Landis and written by Jim Abrahams, David Zucker and Jerry Zucker, who subsequently wrote the classic film comedy, Airplane!. His television roles include guest appearances on hit television series such as ABC's Eight is Enough, CBS's The Waltons and House Calls and NBC's CHiPs. He also hosted the short-lived game show Shopper's Casino in the 1987–88 season. In 1997, his cookbook, inspired by years of playing a mess hall cook on M*A*S*H, titled Secrets of the M*A*S*H Mess: The Lost Recipes of Private Igor, was published and he made an appearance on NBC's Today Show to promote it. Maxwell is a regular participant on the alt.tv.mash newsgroup where, along with series writer Larry Gelbart (up until Gelbart's death in 2009 answers fan questions about the behind-the-scenes workings of M*A*S*H. Before he began his acting career on M*A*S*H, Maxwell was one-half of a comedy team called "Garrett & Maxwell." They performed at clubs throughout the United States for seven years before parting ways Maxwell (according to journalist Peter Palmiere) has been working on a video documentary about female judges and referees in the sport of boxing. Since September 2018, Maxwell has hosted a podcast called MASH Matters

Jeffrey Kramer
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Jeffrey Kramer is an American film and television actor and producer. He made his first appearance on the TV series Barney Miller starring in the episode Snow Job as the "Stick Up Man". Then during the year he made an appearance in his first film, the Oscar-winning horror/thriller movie Jaws, playing Deputy Jeff Hendricks; he reprised the role in the sequel Jaws 2 in 1978; in 1976, he guest starred in Baretta.

He appeared in the Joe Dante cult classic Hollywood Boulevard; during the credit sequence as a girl is walking down the boulevard, when Jeffrey's name pops up, there is a Jaws poster in the visible background. He appeared in the horror film Halloween II playing Graham, a dentist who examines dead Ben Tramer's body, believing him to be Michael Myers. And, during the year, he appeared in Heartbeeps as "Party Butler Robot" in the film. He then made an appearance on Happy Days starring in two episodes, The People vs. the Fonz as "Martin Smith" and Fonzie the Flatfoot as "Lefty". In 1985, he starred in Santa Claus: The Movie as "Towzer"; and finally made his last appearance in Ally McBeal in 1997 as a pedestrian. His most recent film is The 'burbs.

Jewel Shepard
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Shepard arrived in California in the early 80s, where she supported herself by working as a stripper in various Los Angeles strip clubs and modeling for car shoots. It was during her time stripping that she met genre filmmaker Dan O'Bannon. After a number of small television roles, Shepard broke into film with H. B. Halicki's The Junkman (1982). Roles in over a dozen B movies followed; including 1985's The Return of the Living Dead, which was directed and written by O'Bannon. In 1992 she capitalized on her "B-girl" status by penning Invasion of the B-Girls, a book of interviews with cult actresses such as Kitten Natividad, Linnea Quigley, Yvette Vickers, Haji, and Mary Woronov. She has also written for such publications as Premiere, Cosmopolitan, Details, and The Associated Press. Her autobiography, If I'm So Famous, How Come Nobody's Ever Heard of Me? detailing some of the less glamorous aspects of film making and her experiences working in adult entertainment, was published in 1996.

Jewel Shepard is an American writer, photographer, and actress, best known for her roles in movies such as Party Camp (1987) and Return of the Living Dead (1985).

Jimmie Walker
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Jimmie Walker is an American actor and comedian. Walker portrayed James Evans Jr. ("J.J."), the older son of Florida and James Evans Sr., on the CBS television series Good Times, which ran from 1974 to 1979, and was nominated for a Golden Globe Award in 1975 and 1976 for his role. While on the show, Walker's character used the catchphrase "Dyn-O-Mite!" which he also used in his mid–1970s TV commercial for a Panasonic line of cassette and 8-track tape players. He also starred in Let's Do It Again with John Amos, and The Greatest Thing That Almost Happened with James Earl Jones. Walker continues to tour the country with his stand-up comedy routine

In 1967, Walker began working full-time with WRVR, the radio station of the Riverside Church. In 1969, Walker began performing as a stand-up comedian and was eventually discovered by the casting director for Good Times, after making appearances on Rowan & Martin's Laugh In and on the Jack Paar Show. He eventually released one stand-up comedy album during the height of his Good Times popularity: Dyn-o-mite on Buddah Records (5635). During Good Times' 1974–75 season, Walker was 26 years old, though his character was much younger. John Amos, the actor who portrayed Walker's father on Good Times, was actually just eight years older than Walker. Walker credits producer/director John Rich for inventing "Dyn-o-mite!" which Rich insisted Walker say on every episode. Both Walker and executive producer Norman Lear were skeptical of the idea, but the phrase and Walker's character caught on with the audience Off- and on-camera, Walker did not get along with the series' lead, Esther Rolle, because she and Amos disapproved of Walker's increasingly buffoonish character and his popularity, and Walker felt hurt by their disdain. Dissatisfaction led Amos (before Rolle), to leave the show, making Walker the star of the show. Walker was the only Good Times star to not attend Rolle's funeral During 1975 Walker was also a weekend personality on contemporary R&B music station KAGB 103.9 FM licensed to Inglewood in the Los Angeles market. Walker appeared on The Tonight Show and Match Game during the 1970s and early 1980s. He was a five-time panelist on the Match Game-Hollywood Squares Hour from 1983 to 1984. He also appeared on the 1990 revival of Match Game and various game shows during that era. Walker has made guest appearances on Badge 373, The Love Boat, Fantasy Island, The Larry Sanders Show, Son of the Beach, The Drew Carey Show, The John Larroquette Show, In the House, Cagney & Lacey, The Fall Guy, Scrubs, Star Dates, Everybody Hates Chris, George Lopez, Chelsea Lately and Lincoln Heights. He also appeared in the films Rabbit Test (1978), The Concorde ... Airport '79 (1979), Airplane! (1980), Water (1985), Doin' Time (1985), The Guyver (1991), Monster Mash (1995) and Plump Fiction (1997). Aside from guest appearances, he starred in the short-lived television series At Ease in 1983 and Bustin' Loose in 1987. In the 1990s, Walker returned to his radio roots hosting shows on WHIO, WOAI, WLS, and KKAR. In 1996, he appeared on split release with Powerviolence band Spazz distributed by Spazz owned label Slap-a-ham records. In 2010, Walker made a cameo appearance in the movie Big Money Rustlas. In 2011, he appeared in a Syfy channel movie Super Shark. In 2012, Walker's autobiography, Dyn-o-mite! Good Times, Bad Times, Our Times – A Memoir, was published. In 2012, Walker announced the release of his official app developed by Monty Goulet for iOS.

John Dukakis
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John Dukakis is an American entertainer. While attending Brown University in the 1970s, Dukakis was cast in Universal's Jaws 2. He relocated to Hollywood and continued to work as an actor for the next 6 years. He had substantial roles in the films Making Love, Delusion and Split Image and on television in Family Ties, Little House on the Prairie, Taxi the Jim Jones docudrama, Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones and Three Sovereigns for Sarah. He finished his career in New York working on the Broadway and Off-Broadway stage.

John began work with an attorney in Boston named Bob Woolf who had built a significant international practice representing professional athletes. John ran the music business management department and spent most of his time on a developing local act: New Kids on the Block. Within several years the company grew and he was sent to Los Angeles to open an office there with an emphasis on working with other established and developing acts. When he left the company in 1992, the company was also working with Boyz II Men and Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch. Dukakis left Bob Woolf to become the general manager of Paisley Park Records, a joint venture between the artist Prince and Warner Bros. Records. During his tenure, the company released a Prince album as well as projects from George Clinton and Mavis Staples. In 1994, he formed a new venture with his partner, Qadree El-Amin. Southpaw Entertainment was a full service management company. In its early years it primarily focused on the management of Boyz II Men. But after the record-setting success of the 12× platinum "II" album, the company took on new clients. Over the years, Southpaw also handled the careers of Janet Jackson, Vanessa Williams, Brownstone, and Blackstreet.

John Rubinstein
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John Rubinstein is an American actor, Rubinstein's feature films include 21 Grams, Red Dragon, Mercy, Another Stakeout Someone to Watch Over Me, Daniel The Boys from Brazil, Rome & Jewel, Jekyll, Kid Cop, Getting Straight, ZachariahThe Trouble with Girls, and The Car. He appears in the film Being the Ricardos as Jess Oppenheimer.

Since 1965 he has acted in over 200 television films and miniseries episodes including The American Clock, Mrs. Harris, Perfect Murder, Perfect Town, The Sleepwalker, The Two Mrs. Grenvilles, Movieola and Roots: The Next Generations. He received an Emmy Award nomination for his portrayal of Jeff Maitland III in the ABC series Family, a role he played on a recurring basis over the course of the series; he also composed the series’ theme music. He starred for two years with Jack Warden in the CBS series Crazy Like a Fox. He has played recurring parts on The Fosters, The Mentalist, Desperate Housewives, Parenthood, No Ordinary Family, Greek, The Wizards of Waverly Place, Dirty Sexy Money, Day Break, The Practice, Star Trek: Enterprise, The Young and the Restless, and Barbershop.

Kari Michaelsen
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Kari Michaelsen (born Kari Markussen, November 3, 1961) is an American actress, television personality, and motivational speaker. As an actress, she is best known for her role as Katie Kanisky on the sitcom Gimme a Break! (1981–1987)

She graduated from Beverly Hills High School in 1979 and studied at University of California, Los Angeles. She retired from television work in 2001.

Kavi Raz
FIRST CONVENTION APPEARANCE!
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Kavi Raz attended university in the San Francisco Bay area. He was a founder and artistic director of the Wandering Players' Theatre Company. The company staged several World and US premieres of plays from India. Western audiences were exposed to the works of Rabindranath Tagore for the first time, in addition to plays like Sakharam Binder and Shakuntala. This was the first professional South Asian theatre company in the USA.

He went on to become the first ever South Asian actor to be signed on as a regular in a major TV series, St Elsewhere. He was a cast member for the first two seasons of the medical drama, and after being let go continued to appear on a recurring basis. Raz has also appeared in over 200 plays, TV shows and films, including guest appearances on The A-Team, M*A*S*H and Star Trek: The Next Generation. He co-starred with Joe Odagiri and Chloe Snyder in Atsushi Funahashi's Big River in 2005. In addition to acting, Raz has had a career as a filmmaker, which began with The Gold Bracelet, a movie about a Sikh man faced with the realities of post-9/11. In 1978, Raz founded the production company K. R. Films Hollywood. Its debut, Lehren - a television weekly variety series for the Asian audience - was shown throughout the United States and Canada. In 1988, K. R. Studios was built in Granada Hills. Housing several buildings including the main studio, it has state-of-the-art equipment for film and television productions, as well as a multi-track recording facility for post production and recording needs. The studio is now home to many award-winning producers, writers and directors engaged in the production of commercials, TV programs, music videos and films.

Ketty Lester
First Convention Appearance!
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Ketty Lester is an American singer and actress known for her 1961 hit single "Love Letters", which reached the top 5 of the charts in the U.S. and the UK. She is also known for her role as Hester-Sue Terhune on the American television series Little House on the Prairie.

In the early 1950s, she began performing under the name "Ketty Lester" in the city's Purple Onion club. She later toured Europe and South America as a singer with Cab Calloway's orchestra. Ketty Lester (as Revoyda Frierson) appeared as a contestant on the December 26, 1957 episode of You Bet Your Life, hosted by Groucho Marx. Lester sang "You Do Something to Me". The chosen category was "Mother Goose", a subject she admitted knowing nothing about; George Fenneman fed the correct answers to her, and she and her partner won $1,000. Returning to California, she recorded her first single, "Queen for a Day", for the Everest label. She was introduced by Dorothy Shay to record producers and songwriters Ed Cobb and Lincoln Mayorga of The Four Preps and The Piltdown Men, who won her a contract with Era Records in Los Angeles. In 1961 they released her single "Love Letters" b/w "I'm a Fool to Want You". Lester's recording of "Love Letters", which featured Lincoln Mayorga's sparse piano arrangement and Earl Palmer on drums, rose to #5 on the Billboard Hot 100 early in 1962. The record also reached #2 on the R&B chart and #4 on the UK Singles Chart, selling over 1 million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA. In 1991, it was ranked 176th in the RIAA-compiled list of Songs of the Century. In 1962, she toured the UK as support act on the Everly Brothers tour. The follow-up, a version of George and Ira Gershwin's "But Not for Me" from the musical Girl Crazy, reached #41 in the U.S. pop charts and #45 in the UK. She released an album, Love Letters, which contained the tracks "You Can't Lie to a Liar" and a cover of Woody Guthrie's "This Land Is Your Land" (both of which were issued as singles) and was nominated for a Grammy in the Best Female Pop Vocal Performance category Lester continued to record for Era with little success until 1964, when she signed for RCA. She released several unsuccessful singles for that label, and two albums, The Soul of Me and Where Is Love?, in a more R&B-oriented style that has been compared to Dinah Washington and Nancy Wilson. Some of her earlier recordings also featured on one side of an album shared with previously released tracks by Betty Everett. Also in 1964, she won a Theatre World Award for her performance in the off-Broadway show Cabin in the Sky. She moved to the Tower label, issuing a single and album, When A Woman Loves A Man, an answer record to Percy Sledge's "When a Man Loves a Woman". However, these releases, and later records for the Pete label, including a 1968 album titled Ketty Lester, met with little commercial success. By the early 1970s, she gave up singing commercially and turned to acting. She was reportedly offered the role eventually taken by Diahann Carroll in the 1968–71 TV series Julia, and appeared in a variety of movies, including Uptight (1968), Blacula (1972), Uptown Saturday Night (1974) and The Prisoner of Second Avenue (1975). She established herself as a television actress in the 1970s and 1980s, playing the roles of Helen Grant on Days of Our Lives (1975–77) and as Hester-Sue Terhune on Little House on the Prairie (1977–83), as well as making appearances on other television shows and movies, including The Night the City Screamed (1980). She recorded an album of Christian music entitled I Saw Him in1984, and returned to films with roles in Street Knight (1993) and as Aunt Lucy in House Party 3 (1994).

Kevin Thompson
FIRST EVER HS APPEARANCE!
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Kevin Thompson started auditioning and landed a role in the classic sci-fi film Blade Runner (1982) delivering his first on camera line "Home again, home again jiggity jig, Good Evening JF". Later he would work again alongside Harrison Ford in the Star Wars IV-Return Of The Jedi (1983). He continued in the made for television movies as the Ewok Chukha Truk in The Ewok Adventure (1984) and Ewok Battle For Endor (1985).

Kevin appeared in the 80's cult films Weird Science (1985), Amazing Stories (1985), Twilight Zone (1986), Night of The Creeps (1986), Garbage Pail Kids (1987), Spaced Invaders (1990), Looney Tunes Back In Action (2003) Epic Movie (2007)and Mirror Mirror(2012). Television brought Kevin into your living room with such shows as Married With Children, Growing Pains, Boy Meets World, Bob Newhart, Carol & Company, Ally McBeal, Charmed, Malcolm In The Middle and Dexter. A memorable moment for Kevin was being in the opera Tales Of Hoffman, sitting on the lap of Placido Domingo and his favorite role was starring as Micky alongside Carol Burnett. He has been published in the book "The Star Wars Vault" as well as several newspapers and magazines. Kevin has a few trading cards as the character Ali-Gator and his Ewok character.

Kim Miyori
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Kim Miyori is known for the role of 'Dr. Wendy Armstrong' on the first two seasons (1982–1984) of the medical drama "St. Elsewhere."

Kim has appeared in TV shows such as "Babylon 5", "Murder She Wrote", "Magnum P.I.", "JAG" and "24". Her films include: "Loverboy", "The Grudge 2", and in the first film adaptation of "The Punisher", "Metro", and she also played 'Yoko Ono' in "John and Yoko: A Love Story."

Kristina Wayborn
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Kristina Wayborn, is a Swedish actress who worked mostly in the United Kingdom and in the United States.

She was Miss Sweden in 1970 and was a semi-finalist in the Miss Universe pageant that same year. She was also selected as Miss Scandinavia 1971 She was then cast in probably her best known role as Magda in Octopussy (1983) which features a memorable scene in which Magda beats up several of villain Kamal Khan's guards, showing a surprising agility and acumen for martial arts. During filming of this scene, an accident occurred and Wayborn suffered several broken toes Wayborn's performance in the film came in an era predating the big female action heroines of the box office. She subsequently appeared in episodes of such American television series such as The Love Boat, Airwolf, MacGyver, Dallas, General Hospital, Designing Women, Baywatch and That '70s Show, which reunited her with her Octopussy co-star Maud Adams, and other Bond girls Barbara Carrera and Tanya Roberts.

Lana Wood
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Lana Wood (born Svetlana Lisa Gurdin; March 1, 1946) is an American actress and producer She made her film debut in The Searchers as a child actress and later achieved notability for playing Sandy Webber on the TV series Peyton Place and Plenty O'Toole in the James Bond film Diamonds Are Forever. Her sister was Natalie Wood.

In her early career, Wood usually played in films in which Natalie appeared. Starting in the 1960s, her own career took off. After appearing on the short-lived drama series The Long, Hot Summer, she landed the role of Sandy Webber on the soap series Peyton Place. She played the role from 1966 to 1967. She turned down the Karen Black role in Easy Rider (1969), a decision she now cites as the worst mistake she has made in her career. She was cast as a Bond girl, Plenty O'Toole, in the James Bond film Diamonds Are Forever (1971). In 1970, Wood was approached by Hugh Hefner and she agreed to pose for Playboy. The Playboy pictures appeared in the April 1971 issue, along with Wood's poetry. Wood has more than 20 other films and over 300 television series to her credit, including The Fugitive, Bonanza, Mission: Impossible, Wild, Wild West, Police Story, Starsky & Hutch, Nero Wolfe, Fantasy Island, and Capitol. After appearing in the horror film Satan's Mistress (1982), she retired from acting, concentrating on her career as a producer, but since 2008 she has returned to acting in a number of low-budget films. Wood is a character in the Steve Alten book Meg: Hell's Aquarium (2009).

Lance Kerwin
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Lance Kerwin is a former American actor, known primarily for roles in television and film during his childhood and teen years in the 1970s. He played lead roles in the TV series James at 15, and the made-for-TV films The Loneliest Runner and Salem's Lot.

In the 1970s, Kerwin appeared in a number of made-for-TV movies and series. He was, said former theater critic and British Film Institute governor John Holmstrom, "probably America's leading boy actor of the late Seventies ... a handsome lad ... [with] considerable sensitivity as an actor". His serious acting roles often portrayed anguished characters facing difficult challenges, such as in The Loneliest Runner, The Boy Who Drank Too Much, and Children of Divorce. Emergency! (1973, TV Series) - Wheeler Boy The Healers (1974, TV Movie) - Kennedy Brown Little House on the Prairie (1974, TV Series) - Danny Peters Shazam! (1974 TV Series) - Season 1 Episode 2 - Chad Martin Cannon (1974 TV Series) - Season 4 Episode 6 - Unnamed Delivery Boy The Greatest Gift (1974, TV Movie) - Ramey Holvak Reflections of Murder (1974, TV Movie) - Chip The Meanest Men in the West aka Bad Men of the West (1974, TV Series) ABC Afterschool Specials (1974-1976, TV Series) - P.J. / The President's Son / Buzz / Peter Finley / Adam Rush / Ezzie Gunsmoke (1975, TV Series) - Tommy Harker Escape to Witch Mountain (1975) - Boy in Blue-Striped Shirt (uncredited) The Family Holvak (1975, TV Series) - Ramey Holvak Sara (1976, TV Series) - Derek Amelia Earhart (1976, TV Movie) - David Putnam The Loneliest Runner (1976, TV Movie) - John Curtis as a Youth The Death of Richie (1977, TV Movie) - Russell Werner Wonder Woman (1977, TV Series) - Jeff Hadley The Bionic Woman (1977, TV Series) - Prince Ishmail Cheering Section (1977) - Bob Young Joe, the Forgotten Kennedy (1977, TV Movie) - Joe, Jr. (age 14) James at 15 (1977-1978, TV Series) - James Hunter The Busters (1978, TV Movie) Salem's Lot (1979, TV Movie) - Mark Petrie Once Upon a Midnight Scary (1979, TV Series) The Boy Who Drank Too Much (1980, TV Movie) - Billy Carpenter Children of Divorce (1980, TV Movie) - Tony Malik Side Show (1981, TV Movie) - Nick Pallas Advice to the Lovelorn (1981, TV Movie) - Larry Ames CBS Schoolbreak Special (1982, TV Series) - Billy Lee Daniels The Mysterious Stranger (1982, TV Movie) - #44 Trapper John, MD (1982-1985, TV Series) - Gary Gordon / 42 A Killer in the Family (1983, TV Movie) - Ray Tison Faerie Tale Theatre: The Snow Queen (1985, TV Series) - Kay The Fourth Wise Man (1985, TV Movie) - Passhur Enemy Mine (1985) - Wooster Murder She Wrote (1989, TV Series) - Eddie Frayne Final Verdict (1991, TV Movie) - Harry Johnson Outbreak (1995) - American Mercenary The Wind and the Reckoning (2022)

Larry Hankin
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Larry Hankin is an American character actor, performer, director, comedian and producer. He is known for his major film roles as Charley Butts in Escape from Alcatraz (1979), Ace in Running Scared (1986), and Carl Alphonse in Billy Madison (1995). He had smaller roles as Doobie in Planes, Trains and Automobiles, Sergeant Larry Balzak in Home Alone, Mr. Heckles in Friends and Joe in Breaking Bad.

His first notable supporting role was as Pt. Romero in Viva Max! in 1969. Hankin is known for his roles in TV shows Breaking Bad, Matlock, Friends (as Mr. Heckles) and Seinfeld (as Tom Pepper), as well as for his major role in Escape from Alcatraz (1979) with Clint Eastwood. He also acted in How Sweet It Is! (1968) with Debbie Reynolds and James Garner and the Adam Sandler movie Billy Madison (1995). He had cameo appearances in three John Hughes films, Planes, Trains and Automobiles (1987); She's Having a Baby (1988); and Home Alone (1990); which coincidentally featured Roberts Blossom (playing Old Man Marley), whom he co-starred with in Escape from Alcatraz. He had brief appearances in Pretty Woman as the landlord (1990), as well as minor roles in Loose Shoes (1980), The Sure Thing (1985), and Running Scared (1986). Hankin also appeared in Married... with Children, as well as one of the Halloween specials of Home Improvement. Hankin also appeared in three episodes of Star Trek: Voyager as Gaunt Gary and one episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation. Hankin and Curtis Armstrong played the hippie entrepreneurs who purchased "Buy the Book" (the bookstore where the titular character works at) on Ellen. On Seinfeld, Hankin portrayed Tom Pepper, the actor cast as Kramer on the pilot-within-a-TV-show Jerry. He portrayed a homeless man in season 5 of Malcolm in the Middle. He then appeared again with Bryan Cranston in seasons three and five of Breaking Bad as junkyard owner Old Joe. He reprised his old role from Breaking Bad in the Netflix sequel film El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie. One of Hankin's earliest roles was playing the lead character of Farley in the 1964 educational film Too Tough to Care. In 1977, Hankin appeared in the episode "The Bums vs. the Reds" of the situation comedy The San Pedro Beach Bums. He also played Mickey the Bartender in a WKRP in Cincinnati episode called "Hotel Oceanview" that also has a cameo appearance by Dr. Joyce Brothers as "Vicky Von Vicky". In 1982, he played the dog catcher that tries to take Sandy in Annie. In 1980, Hankin's short film Solly's Diner earned him and the film's producers a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Live Action Short Film. Hankin was a founding member of the commedia dell'arte improvisation group The Committee in 1963, located at an indoor bocce ball court in San Francisco's North Beach district. He appeared in the Janet Jackson music video for her 1986 hit single "What Have You Done for Me Lately" as a cook/waiter. He recently portrayed a depressed Chechen hitman in the HBO series Barry in 2018. In 2021, he appeared in Friends: The Reunion.

Larry Thomas
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Larry Thomas is an American actor, best known for his guest role as Yev Kassem/the Soup Nazi on Seinfeld, for which he was nominated for an Emmy Award. In addition to making personal appearances as the Soup Nazi, Thomas has appeared in a number of films, TV shows, and commercials.

He is best known for his role as Yev Kassem in the "Soup Nazi" episode of the television sitcom Seinfeld. According to an interview, Thomas, who was a huge fan of the series, attended his audition in character in a military uniform, and won the role by improvising his now-famous line, "No soup for you!" His widely acclaimed performance earned him a nomination for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series in 1996, which he lost to Tim Conway for Coach. He reprised the role in the series' final episode. In 1997, he made a cameo appearance as the blackjack dealer in Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, sharing the scene with Mike Myers and Robert Wagner. In 2004, he guest-starred as himself in the Scrubs episode "My Self-Examination", where the main character tried to trick him into saying the Soup Nazi's catchphrase, "No Soup for You!" He also played a Soup Nazi-like "food cop" in a commercial for the Center for Consumer Freedom. That same year he guest-starred in the television series Drake & Josh as Bob Galloway in the episode "2 Idiots and a Baby." In 2006, Thomas made an appearance in Scott Grenke's independent comedy feature Spaced Out (which includes a variation of the catchphrase). This was the start of a working relationship with Boomstick Films which includes co-starring roles in Not Another B Movie, Dr. Spine, and the award-winning Paranormal Activity spoof Paranormal Calamity. In other later roles of note, Larry has portrayed each of the two most iconic Middle Eastern villains of American history. In 2006, he guest-starred in Arrested Development as a Saddam Hussein lookalike. An earlier joke had one character having a photo taken with the real Saddam, after mistaking him for Thomas. Thomas also played the role of Osama bin Laden in Uwe Boll's 2008 shock comedy film Postal. In 2009, Thomas appeared in the independent feature Untitled Horror Comedy playing the role of "Dwayne." In February 2012, Thomas again appeared as the Soup Nazi in an Acura NSX commercial featuring comedians Jerry Seinfeld and Jay Leno. In February 2013, he began filming for Tesla Effect: A Tex Murphy Adventure, a video game using live-action cut-scenes In 2016, he appeared in a short comedy film The Love Suckers, playing a marriage therapist giving bad advice to a couple along with Eddie Deezen and Caryn Richman. His latest project is Dads!, a television sitcom pilot that is written, directed, and produced by Thomas and David Everhart Castro. It is currently in post-production. Public appearances as the Soup Nazi In 2006, Thomas began selling autographed photographs of himself through catalogs such as Wall Street Creations Inc., glaring at the camera in chef's garb, with the handwritten notation "No soup for you!" In 2011, Thomas appeared dressed as the Soup Nazi at a New York Mets game. He gave DVDs to fans who correctly answered trivia questions In 2012, he again appeared as the Soup Nazi while touring the United States with a Seinfeld food truck, allowing fans to pose with him and signing autographs. On July 5, 2014, he appeared at Brooklyn Cyclones as the Soup Nazi to celebrate Salute to Seinfeld Night, and threw out the first pitch. In 2015, he reprised his role as the Soup Nazi when Hulu opened "Seinfeld: The Apartment" in New York City, creating a real-world version of Jerry Seinfeld's Upper West Side apartment, complete with a show memorabilia gallery and interactive Seinfeld fan experience to mark the streaming debut of all episodes of the series on Hulu. In September 2018, Thomas appeared as the Soup Nazi for a surprise guest appearance at a wedding in Old Tappan, New Jersey. He announced the couple for the first time as husband and wife, and later took photos with their guests. Several photos from the wedding can be seen using the hashtag #soupnaziwedding on Instagram.

Lindsay and Sidney Greenbush
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Lindsay and Sidney had their first break sharing the role of Jill Hayden in the 1973 television film "Sunshine" with Cliff DeYoung. After the film wrapped, Michael Landon was casting for his series called "Little House on the Prairie" (based on the series of books by Laura Ingalls Wilder). The Director of "Sunshine", Joseph Sargent, recommended the twins for the role of the youngest daughter Carrie Ingalls. Finally, Landon met them and signed them immediately.

On March 30, 1974 the pilot of "Little House" premiered on NBC, and it was a hit. Six months after the success of the pilot, it had turned into a weekly series. The series premiered on September 11, 1974, and it was a hit as well. In the series, they are billed as Lindsay Sidney Greenbush. The first season, ended with the show at #13 in the ratings. In its second season, the show was in danger of getting the ax because it slipped out of the top 30. Attempting to save the show, NBC moved it from Wednesday to Monday night. By the end of its third season, the show was at #16. The Carrie character was limited, and fans of the series wanted to see more of her. On December 18, 1978 the fans' wish came true: they get to see the twins alongside one another in an episode called "The Godsister", in which a heartsick Carrie feels lonely after her Pa goes away to work for a month. Carrie creates an imaginary friend, Alyssa, to heal her heartache. The twins switched roles for those characters as well. From seasons 4-7, the show hovered inside the top 20. During the show's success, the twins (along with co-stars Melissa Gilbert and Melissa Sue Anderson) built a fan base across the country. For the ninth season, Michael Landon decided to take "Little House" in a new direction, and the show was re-tooled as "Little House: A New Beginning". The twins' absence was explained by having the Ingalls family (except Laura) move to Burr Oak, Iowa, to build a much better life. After the sisters' departure from "Little House" in 1982, Lindsay guest starred in "Matt Houston" in 1983. She portrayed a victim of abuse. Lindsay went to audition for the part of Dorothy Gale in "Return To Oz". Unfortunately, the producers passed on her because she was considered too old. Sidney starred as Amy McVickers on "Hillie and Hambone" in 1984 with the late Alan Hale. Outside "Little House", the twins appeared in magazines, commercials, etc. In 1978, the twins wrote to Amy Carter, whose father was president at the time. Carter wrote back, expressing her desire to have them visit the White House, and off they went. Amy told them that "Little House" was her favorite show, so the twins gave her a gift: a portrait of the cast.

Linnea Quigley
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Linnea Quigley is an American actress, film producer, model, singer, and author. She is best known as a B-movie actress, and is often referred to as a "scream queen" due to her frequent appearances in low-budget horror films during the 1980s and 1990s. small parts mostly in B movies. Her first bigger part was in the 1981 slasher film, Graduation Day. Quigley followed with more films such as Savage Streets (1984) and Silent Night, Deadly Night (1984).

In 1985, Quigley appeared in the zombie horror film The Return of the Living Dead playing a teenaged punk, which is considered one of her most notable roles and earned her "scream queen" status. During the second half of the 1980s, Quigley starred in a number of low-budget films following the popularization of home video. She repeatedly worked with the directors David DeCoteau (Creepozoids, Nightmare Sisters, and Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama) and Kevin Tenney (Night of the Demons and Witchtrap), and appeared alongside fellow scream queens Brinke Stevens and Michelle Bauer. By the end of the 1980s, Quigley decided to take a different direction and starred in the first two films of Rick Sloane's comedy series Vice Academy. However, she continued being type cast as a victim in horror films. Aside from her acting career, Quigley is also a singer (she formed an all-female band The Skirts in the early 1980s) and an author (she wrote three books; The Linnea Quigley Bio & Chainsaw Book, I'm Screaming as Fast as I Can: My Life in B-Movies, and Skin). Quigley is best known for her role in The Return of the Living Dead (1985) (directed by Dan O'Bannon). She has also starred in dozens of other horror films, including Savage Streets (with Linda Blair), Silent Night, Deadly Night, Nightmare Sisters, Creepozoids, Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama, Hollywood Chainsaw Hookers, Night of the Demons (the 1988 original and the 2009 remake), and A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master. Quigley is the author of two books about her career as a B-movie actress, Chainsaw and I'm Screaming as Fast as I Can. She has been called the "Queen of the Bs". Linnea co-starred with Daniel Baldwin in Stripperland (2011). She played in David DeCoteau's movies 1313: Cougar Cult (2012) and 3 Scream Queens (2014), and Charles Band's web series Trophy Heads (2014) with Brinke Stevens and Michelle Bauer. In 2012, Quigley guest appeared in Massachusetts death metal band Sexcrement's music video entitled "Trucker Bombed". Alongside regular co-stars Brinke Stevens, and Michelle Bauer, Quigley appeared in and was a main subject for the 2011 documentary Screaming in High Heels: The Rise & Fall of the Scream Queen Era and its 2020 follow up Screaming in High Heels: The Reunion. According to Deadline Hollywood and Horror Fuel magazine, Linnea will co-star alongside horror icons Michael Berryman, Bill Moseley and Kane Hodder in the 2022 feature Jasper, produced by Shaun Cairo Pitchfork (film).

Linwood Boomer
*FRIDAY ONLY* First HS appearance! **All of his proceeds from his appearance will be donated to benefit the Healing California charity**
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Linwood Boomer is a Canadian-American television producer, writer, and former actor. He is known for playing the role of Adam Kendall on the drama Little House on the Prairie, and for creating the Fox sitcom Malcolm in the Middle.

Boomer began his career as an actor. After playing Adam Kendall on Little House on the Prairie, Boomer began focusing his talents on the behind-the-scenes aspects of television. Boomer's writing and executive producing credits include Night Court, Flying Blind, The Boys Are Back, Townies, 3rd Rock from the Sun and God, the Devil and Bob. He also created and executive produced the pilots Family Business, Nice Try, and the U.S. version of Red Dwarf, and served as an executive producer under James L. Brooks for the pilot of Big. He also owns his own production company Satin City. Although Boomer has created, produced and acted in many television series, he is best known for creating the Fox sitcom Malcolm in the Middle, which was based on his life story. The debut episode of the series was watched by 22.5 million viewers, and the second episode was watched by 26 million viewers. The series ran for seven seasons from 2000 to 2006 and in total had 151 episodes. Boomer wrote two episodes, starting with "Pilot" and then "Francis Escapes" and directed five episodes -- "Opera," "Stilts," "Reese vs. Stevie," "Bride of Ida," and the series finale, "Graduation." Boomer received a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series for the pilot episode.

Loretta Swit
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Loretta Swit is an American stage and television actress known for her character roles. Swit is best known for her portrayal of Major Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan on M*A*S*H, for which she won two Emmy Awards.

When Swit arrived in Hollywood in 1969, she performed guest roles in various television series, including Hawaii Five-O (her first TV credit), Gunsmoke, Mission: Impossible, and Mannix Starting in 1972, Swit played the lusty, extremely capable head nurse Major Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan in the television series M*A*S*H, a comedy set in a US Mobile Army Surgical Hospital during the Korean War. Swit inherited the star-making role from actress Sally Kellerman, who portrayed Houlihan in the feature film. In the first few seasons her character was single and blindly patriotic, and she had no friends among the camp surgeons and nurses, with the notable exception of her married lover, Major Frank Burns, portrayed by Larry Linville. Over time her character was considerably softened. She married a lieutenant-colonel but divorced soon after. She became good friends with her fellow officers, and her attitude towards the Koreans in and around the camp became more enlightened. The change reflected that of the series in general, from absurdist dark humor to mature comedy-drama. Swit was one of only four cast members to stay for all 11 seasons of the show, from 1972 to 1983 (the others are Alan Alda, Jamie Farr, and William Christopher). Swit and Alda were the only actors to have been in both the pilot episode and the finale; she appeared in all but 11 of the total of 256 episodes. Swit received two Emmy Awards for her work on M*A*S*H. Her favorite episodes are "Hot Lips & Empty Arms", "Margaret's Engagement" and "The Nurses". She also had a close relationship with Harry Morgan, who played Colonel Sherman T. Potter. They became neighbors after the series ended, In 1981, Swit played the Christine Cagney role in the movie pilot for the television series Cagney & Lacey but was precluded by contractual obligations from continuing the role. Actress Meg Foster portrayed Cagney for the first six episodes of the television series, then Sharon Gless took over the role. Swit also guest-starred in shows such as Bonanza, The Love Boat, Win, Lose or Draw, Password, Gunsmoke, Match Game, Pyramid, The Muppet Show and Hollywood Squares. On one episode of Match Game, Swit wrote the Polish greeting "Dzień dobry" (even with the diacritical mark) on her card during the introduction. She also starred in Christmas programs such as the television version of The Best Christmas Pageant Ever and 1987's PBS special A Christmas Calendar.[14] In 1988 she hosted Korean War-The Untold Story, a documentary on the true events of the war and went to South Korea to film it, becoming the first M*A*S*H cast member to actually visit the country outside of Jamie Farr and Alan Alda who both served there in the mid-1950s while members of the US Army. In 1992, she hosted the 26-part series Those Incredible Animals on the Discovery Channel. Swit's latest appearance was on GSN Live on October 10, 2008. She was also in the TV movie The Last Day, 1975, with Richard Widmark and Robert Conrad Swit guest-starred with Mike Connors in Mannix, Episode 78, Season 4, "Figures in a Landscape", written by Paul Krasny Directed by Donn Mullally originally airing on October 10, 1970. Swit guest-starred in Hawaii Five-O episode "Bait Once, Bait Twice", January 4, 1972. She also played Wanda Russell in the Hawaii Five-O episode titled "Three Dead Cows at Makapuu" which aired February 25, 1970.

Luciana Paluzzi
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Luciana Paluzzi is an Italian-American actress. She is perhaps best known for playing SPECTRE assassin Fiona Volpe in the fourth James Bond film, Thunderball, but she had important roles in notable films of the 1960s and 1970s in both the Italian film industry and Hollywood, including Chuka, The Green Slime, 99 Women, Black Gunn, The Klansman and The Sensuous Nurse.

One of her first roles was an uncredited walk-on part in Three Coins in the Fountain (1954), which she got by chance through a friend of her father's who was invited for dinner and happened to be looking for a young actress doing a very short two-line role for director Jean Negulesco, thinking Paluzzi might be a fit. Negulesco had not been satisfied with the other actresses so far, but when Paluzzi, who did not plan to become an actress, recited the English line the next day (it was the only English she spoke at that time) she got the role.[2] Paluzzi went on to appear in many movies, most of which were made in her native Italy. In her early films, she is credited as Luciana Paoluzzi. In 1957, she came to England to appear in the British war film No Time To Die (also known as Tank Force) alongside Victor Mature.She was then cast in the British action drama Sea Fury as the Spanish-born Josita, who is fought over by Stanley Baker and Victor McLaglen's characters. In 1959, Paluzzi went to Hollywood under contract with Twentieth Century Fox Television to star as a regular in the TV series Five Fingers, which was cancelled after three months.[6][7] Paluzzi then played Rafaella, the wife of Brett Halsey's character Ted Carter, in 1961's Return to Peyton Place. From 1963 to 1965, Paluzzi almost exclusively appeared in Italian productions. In 1965, Paluzzi was cast as SPECTRE villainess, Fiona Volpe, "volpe" is "fox" in Italian, in Thunderball (1965), for which she is best known. She had auditioned for the part of the lead Bond girl, Dominetta "Domino" Petacchi, but producers instead cast Claudine Auger, changing the character's name from an Italian to a Frenchwoman, renaming her Dominique Derval. Initially crestfallen when informed she did not get the part, Paluzzi rejoiced when told her consolatory prize was the part of Volpe, which she said was "more fun" to play.Paluzzi later claimed being a Bond girl was a double-edged sword. In the documentary Bond Girls Are Forever, Paluzzi expressed amazement at the level of fame, publicity, and recognition she received from Thunderball; but as a result of being in such an outlandish film, she felt she was taken less seriously as an actress when returning to the Italian film industry. Paluzzi appeared in such films as Muscle Beach Party (1964) and Chuka (1967). She co-starred in the 1969 women in prison film 99 Women,[9] and as a Southern belle in the 1974 Hollywood drama The Klansman (with her voice dubbed by American actress Joanna Moore). Television In 1959–60, Paluzzi appeared with David Hedison in the short-lived espionage television series, Five Fingers. She appeared with Tab Hunter in an episode of The Tab Hunter Show in 1960. In 1962 she played a murderous wife in an episode of Thriller titled "Flowers of Evil". In 1964 she played the villainess in an episode of The Man from U.N.C.L.E., as the seductive THRUSH agent Angela in the first-season episode "The Four Steps Affair" and in the movie version of the show's pilot episode, To Trap a Spy. In 1966 she played Baroness Carla Montaglia in Season 3, Episode 3 "Face of a Shadow" in Twelve O'Clock High.Also in 1966, she played Greek bar owner Tuesday Hajadakis in the premier episode of The Girl from U.N.C.L.E. .In 1967 she played the seductive foreign agent Marla Valemska in "Matchless," the premier episode of Mr. Teriffic. In 1971 Paluzzi appeared as a special guest star in "Powderkeg," the pilot movie for the CBS TV series, Bearcats!. In 1978 she portrayed journalist Liana Labella in the Hawaii Five-O episode "My Friend, the Enemy". Also starred in Bonanza, 'The Dowry', in 1962.

Lynn-Holly Johnson
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Lynn-Holly Johnson is an American retired figure skater and actress. After achieving some success as a figure skater in the mid-1970s, she began an acting career, including a Golden Globe-nominated role in 1978's Ice Castles and her role as Bibi Dahl in the 1981 James Bond film For Your Eyes Only.

Johnson won the silver medal at the novice level of the 1974 U.S. Figure Skating Championships. She gave up competitive skating in 1977 to turn professional and join the Ice Capades, and subsequently began an acting career, making her film debut in Ice Castles, in which she portrayed Alexis "Lexie" Winston, a figure skater who is blinded by a blood clot in her brain. The film, a romantic drama co-starring Robby Benson, was a minor success in December 1978, grossing $18 million in the US. Johnson, who was described as "an appealing young woman who actually happens to be a good skater who can act" by film critic Roger Ebert, was nominated for a Golden Globe as "Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year – Actress" for her performance in the film. Johnson was subsequently cast in the lead role of the Disney horror drama The Watcher in the Woods. The film received a limited release in April 1980, but it was soon withdrawn and not given a wider release until October 1981. Also in 1981, Johnson had a minor supporting role as Bibi Dahl in the James Bond movie For Your Eyes Only; the character's name is a pun on the endearing term "baby doll" as well as likely being an homage to Roald Dahl, who wrote the screenplay for the 1967 Bond movie You Only Live Twice. In For Your Eyes Only, she played yet another figure skater who has a crush on James Bond, played by Roger Moore. In 1984, Johnson starred in Where the Boys Are '84, a remake of the 1960 film of the same name. In 1996, Johnson quit acting to concentrate on her family; her last acting role at that time was a made-for-television film, Fugitive X: Innocent Target.

Martha Swatek
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Martha Swatek and her sisters competed in windsurfing competitions in the 1970s; this might have influenced her casting choice in Jaws 2.

Martha Swatek and her sisters competed in windsurfing competitions in the 1970s; this might have influenced her casting choice in Jaws 2. She was a Kodak model.

Martine Beswick
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Martine Beswick (born 26 September 1941) is an English-Jamaican actress and model perhaps best known for her roles in two James Bond films, From Russia with Love (1963) and Thunderball (1965), who went on to appear in several other notable films in the 1960s.

Beswick is best known for her two appearances in the James Bond film series. Although she auditioned for the first Bond film Dr. No (1962), she was cast in the second film From Russia with Love (1963) as the fiery gypsy girl, Zora. She engaged in a "catfight" scene with her rival Vida (played by former Miss Israel Aliza Gur). Beswick later stated that there was as much bad feeling with Gur offscreen as well as on, with the film's director, Terence Young, encouraging Beswick to get rough with Gur. "I was a very nice girl but Aliza was a cow. We had terrible clashes and I was disgusted with her. I had a lot of anger inside of me so that [fight] scene was a perfect way to work it out. We rehearsed the fight for three weeks but when we shot it, Aliza was really fighting. Everyone encouraged me to fight back, so I did. We got into a real scrapping match." — Martine Beswick She was incorrectly billed as "Martin Beswick" in the title sequence. Beswick then appeared as the ill-fated Paula Caplan in Thunderball (1965). She had been away from the Caribbean so long that she was required to sunbathe constantly for two weeks before filming, to look like a local. Beswick went on to appear in One Million Years B.C. (1966) opposite Raquel Welch, with whom she also engaged in a catfight. She played Adelita in the well-regarded Spaghetti Western, A Bullet for the General (1966) opposite Klaus Kinski and Gian Maria Volonté and played a villainous role in the exploitation thriller The Penthouse (1967). She then appeared in various Hammer Studio low-budget films, most notably Prehistoric Women (1967) (aka Slave Girls of the White Rhinoceros) and the gender-bending horror Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde (1971), in which she played the titular villainess. She had a supporting role in the Italian sex comedy The Last Italian Tango (1973). She then starred as the Queen of Evil in Oliver Stone's 1974 directorial debut Seizure, or Queen of Evil. In the 1970s, Beswick moved to Hollywood and regularly appeared on both the big and small screens. She made numerous guest appearances on television series, including Sledge Hammer!, Fantasy Island, The Fall Guy, Mannix, The Six Million Dollar Man and Falcon Crest. In 1980, she played the lead role in the comedy film The Happy Hooker Goes Hollywood. Beswick's career was active well into the 1990s. Since then, she has mainly participated in film documentaries, providing commentary and relating her experiences on the many films in which she has appeared. She owned a removals business in London, but is now semiretired except for her guest appearances at international Bond conventions. In April 2013, she was one of 12 Bond Girl celebrity guests in an episode of the BBC's Masterchef. Beginning with Melvin and Howard (1980), she changed the spelling of her last name to "Beswicke", but reverted to her original name in the mid-1990s; her last credit with the longer spelling is Wide Sargasso Sea (1993).

Mary Stävin
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Mary Stävin is a Swedish actress, model and beauty queen who won Miss World 1977 in London. She is the third Swedish woman to win the Miss World crown. Among her more prominent acting roles are bit parts in two of Roger Moore's James Bond films. In Octopussy (1983), she played an Octopussy girl, and in A View to a Kill (1985), she played agent Kimberley Jones. She had supporting roles as the character Tanya in the 1986 horror movie House, which starred William Katt, and the horror film Open House (1987), starring Joseph Bottoms. Her other films included Alien Terminator (1988) with Roger Moore's daughter Deborah, The Opponent (1988), Strike Commando 2 (1988), Born to Fight (1989) and Howling V: The Rebirth (1989). She also played the Icelandic businesswoman Heba in "Twin Peaks" (Season 1, Ep. 6).

In addition to acting, Stävin released the exercise album Shape Up and Dance with George Best and appeared in two music videos for Adam Ant. These were "Ant Rap" (1981) and "Strip" (1983).

Max Gail
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Max Gail is an American actor who has starred on stage, and in television and film roles. He is best known for his role as Detective Stan "Wojo" Wojciehowicz on the sitcom Barney Miller (1975–1982), which earned him two consecutive Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series nominations. Gail also won the 2019 and 2021 Daytime Emmy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role as Mike Corbin on the soap opera General Hospital.

Gail is best known for his television role as Det. Stan "Wojo" Wojciehowicz in the sitcom Barney Miller (1975–1982). Gail's best-known feature film role is in D.C. Cab (1983) as Harold, the owner of the D.C. Cab taxi company. He directed several episodes of Barney Miller as Maxwell Gail. In 1984, Gail was featured in the monodrama The Babe on Broadway. This stage play was filmed and later featured on PBS. Gail has starred in other TV series, including Whiz Kids (1983) as Llewellan Farley Jr., an investigative reporter who is friends with a group of teenaged computer hackers. He worked on the short-lived Normal Life (1990). He has appeared on the TV series Sons & Daughters (2006). Gail has made many guest appearances on TV shows such as: Walker, Texas Ranger ("Whitewater"); Cannon, Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, Due South, The Streets of San Francisco, Paul Sand in Friends and Lovers, The Drew Carey Show, Hawaii Five-0, Quantum Leap, Psych, Longmire, Gary Unmarried, NCIS, Scorpion, and Mad Men. Gail appeared as Brooklyn Dodgers manager Burt Shotton in the 2013 film 42, about Jackie Robinson's first two years as a member of the Dodgers organization, including his first year of playing at the major-league level in 1947. Gail runs Full Circle, a production company that has featured documentaries on such subjects as Agent Orange, Native Americans, and nuclear issues. Gail stepped into the recast role of Mike Corbin on General Hospital. He debuted on February 5, 2018, and went on to win the 2019 Daytime Emmy Award for Best Supporting Actor.

Melissa Gilbert
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Melissa Gilbert is an American actress, television director, producer, politician, and former president of the Screen Actors Guild.

Gilbert began her career as a child actress in the late 1960s, appearing in numerous commercials and guest starring roles on television. From 1974 to 1983, she starred as Laura Ingalls Wilder, the second oldest daughter of Charles Ingalls (played by Michael Landon) on the NBC series Little House on the Prairie. During the run of Little House, Gilbert appeared in several television films, including The Diary of Anne Frank and The Miracle Worker. As an adult, she continued her career mainly in television films. Gilbert has also continued with guest starring roles on television and has completed voice work for animation such as Batman: The Animated Series as Barbara Gordon / Batgirl. From 2009 to 2010, Gilbert appeared as Caroline "Ma" Ingalls in the touring production of Little House on the Prairie, the Musical. In 2012, she was a contestant on season fourteen of the popular reality dance competition show Dancing with the Stars on ABC. Gilbert served as the President of the Screen Actors Guild from 2001 to 2005. In 2009, her autobiography Prairie Tale: A Memoir, was released.

Michelle Bauer
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Michelle Bauer is an American actress, model, and scream queen. Bauer was Penthouse magazine's Pet of the Month for July 1981[and also appeared in many other adult magazines during the early to mid 1980s, under a number of different names.

Bauer also starred in the pornographic film Cafe Flesh (1982) under the name of Pia Snow. She states that she was happy to appear in the film, and on the covers of other X-rated films, but insisted on a double for the sex scenes. Bauer appeared in several other titles under her Pia Snow moniker, including Bad Girls, Bizarre People, Nightdreams, and others. Bauer's Penthouse centerfold appearance led to acting for the Playboy Channel and a film try-out for director Fred Olen Ray. Ray liked her audition, and offered her the part if she would be willing to dye her hair black. Her first B-movie was The Tomb (1986) it would be the first of many. Along with Linnea Quigley and Brinke Stevens, Bauer became the most prominent B-movie scream queens in the late 1980s. Her life and career are one of the main subjects of the 2011 documentary Screaming in High Heels: The Rise and Fall of the Scream Queen Era by director Jason Paul Collum. She returned for the 2020 follow up Screaming in High Heels: The Reunion which reunited her with fellow actors and subjects Linnea Quigley and Brinke Stevens.

Michelle Johnson
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Michelle Johnson is an American actress, perhaps best known for her role as Jennifer Lyons in the 1984 romantic comedy film Blame It on Rio, Jessica Cole in ‘’The Glimmer Man’’ (1996), and Kim Carlisle in ‘’The Love Boat’’ (1984-1985).

At age 16, Johnson began doing fashion print work and was soon signed by the Wilhelmina agency in New York City Director Stanley Donen spotted her in a photograph in the fashion biweekly W, and just as her modeling career was beginning, chose her to act in his feature film Blame It on Rio instead. Since she was 17 at the time, she required permission from a judge to appear topless in the film. Johnson appeared in a number of roles over the next 15 years. She appeared in theatrical films, television movies, and television series, including a recurring role for one season of The Love Boat. She appeared in films Gung Ho (1986), Waxwork (1988), and The Glimmer Man (1996). She also co-starred in TV movie Dallas: War of the Ewings in 1998 as Jennifer Jantzen, and in 1985 played Rhonda Cummings in an episode of Dallas. Since 2000, Johnson has starred in only one film, Mickey (2004).

Monica Keena
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Monica Keena (born May 28, 1979) is an American actress. She made her film debut in While You Were Sleeping (1995), and a lead role as Lilliana "Lilli" Hoffman in Snow White: A Tale of Terror (1997).

She later starred as Lori Campbell in Freddy vs. Jason (2003), and has had roles in the films Brooklyn Rules (2007) and the 2009 remake of Night of the Demons. Keena has also worked in television, starring as Abby Morgan on Dawson's Creek, Rachel Lindquist on the short-lived comedy Undeclared, and Kristen on HBO's Entourage. Keena portrayed Bertha in a stage reading of Strindberg's The Father and had her first starring role playing Lilliana "Lilli" Hoffman in the folktale-inspired film Snow White: A Tale of Terror. She has appeared in numerous television and movie projects including the TBS Original Movie First Daughter and Crime and Punishment in Suburbia which appeared at the 2000 Sundance Film Festival. Monica appeared in the film While You Were Sleeping, The Simian Line with Lynn Redgrave, and Bad Girls From Valley High with the film eventually released straight to DVD in 2005. In 2003, she played the heroine Lori Campbell in Freddy vs. Jason. In 2006, she played Celia in the film Left in Darkness. Keena had a recurring role as Abby Morgan on Dawson's Creek and a starring role on the short-lived Undeclared as the college student Rachel. Keena also had guest roles on series such as Law & Order, Law & Order: Criminal Intent, Homicide: Life on the Street, Feds, and Entourage. On the hit ABC medical drama Grey's Anatomy, she appeared in the second season episode "Into You Like A Train" in which she played Bonnie, a patient who was severely injured in a massive train accident. She later reappeared in the third season episode "Some Kind of Miracle" to reprise her role as Bonnie. Keena appears as Maddie Curtis in Adam Gierasch's straight-to-video 2009 remake Night of the Demons.

Morgan Fairchild
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Morgan Fairchild is an American actress. She began acting in the early 1970s and has had roles in several television series since.

Fairchild began her career on the CBS daytime soap opera Search for Tomorrow as Jennifer Pace from 1973 to 1977. In 1978, she appeared on the primetime soap opera Dallas as the first actress to portray Jenna Wade, before taking a lead role on the NBC series Flamingo Road in 1980 (for which she was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Television Series Drama). In 1984, she co-starred on ABC's short-lived television drama Paper Dolls, and then appeared on Falcon Crest as attorney Jordan Roberts from 1985 to 1986. Fairchild has also performed in theater and played guest roles on television comedies, including Murphy Brown (for which she was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series), Two and a Half Men, Roseanne, Cybill and Friends Fairchild's first acting job was as a double for Faye Dunaway during filming for the film Bonnie and Clyde (1967), particularly in scenes where Bonnie is supposed to be driving a car, because Dunaway could not drive a stick shift.[3][1] She took her new first name, Morgan, from the David Warner film Morgan - A Suitable Case for Treatment (1966). Fairchild then moved to New York City, where she secured her first credited onscreen role as the maniacal Jennifer Pace in the daytime soap opera Search for Tomorrow from 1973 until 1977. From the mid-1970s, she began to make various appearances on episodic primetime television series such as Kojak, Happy Days, Police Woman, The Bob Newhart Show, and a few episodes of CBS Radio Mystery Theater. Fairchild played Jenna Wade in the soap opera Dallas for one episode in 1978. The same year, Fairchild made the television film The Initiation of Sarah and also had a recurring role on the sitcom Mork & Mindy. In 1980, she scored her first regular primetime role as Constance Weldon Carlyle on the soap opera Flamingo Road. Though the series had an impressive beginning, the ratings soon dropped and it was cancelled after two seasons. Fairchild was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for her role After the cancellation of Flamingo Road, Fairchild continued to make guest appearances in a variety of episodic television series such as Hotel, Simon & Simon, Magnum, P.I. and The Love Boat. She also starred in the theatrical film The Seduction (1982). In 1984, along with Joan Collins, she co-hosted the ABC-TV special Blondes vs. Brunettes, a one-hour variety show that gently poked fun at popular culture's blonde vs. brunette rivalry. In that same year, she also co-starred in another primetime soap opera Paper Dolls playing modelling agency owner Racine. The series was cancelled halfway through its first season, but by this time, Fairchild was established as a television actress. In 1985, she joined the cast of the soap opera Falcon Crest, playing the glamorous lawyer Jordan Roberts for a season. She also appeared in the miniseries North and South (1985), and its sequel (1986). In 1985, Jon Lovitz on Saturday Night Live created the "Tommy Flanagan, The Pathological Liar" character who claimed outlandish achievements for himself, culminating in the grand illusion that his wife was Morgan Fairchild. The obvious remoteness of such a possibility, and its mainstream comic appeal, was testimonial to Fairchild's broad popularity and desirability. Fairchild continued to make appearances in films and television series throughout the 1980s, and garnered an Emmy Award nomination for her guest appearance in a 1989 episode of Murphy Brown. In the early 1990s, she was cast in a recurring role in Roseanne, as Sandra Bernhard's bisexual girlfriend Marla. In 1994, Fairchild appeared in an unexpectedly campy advertisement campaign for clothing retailer Old Navy, with Joan Collins and other formerly familiar faces on television. Her reprised role as the over-the-top glamour vixen was so successful that the company created numerous sequels around her persona. In 1995, Fairchild returned to daytime soap operas as the catty Sydney Chase on The City. She played the role for a year, after which she went on to appear in General Hospital. She also made guest appearances on the hit sitcom Friends (as Chandler Bing's mother, Nora) and was a recurring guest star on the sitcom Cybill as Andrea, a rival of Cybill Shepherd's character. Through the years, Fairchild has also appeared in various theater productions. More recently, she starred in the role of Mrs. Robinson in the stage adaptation of the film The Graduate. She also fronted an international advertising campaign for the consumer tooth whitening product Dental White In 2005, Fairchild appeared in the competition reality show But Can They Sing? on VH1. In 2006, she was cast in yet another of her "rich bitch" roles in the MyNetworkTV series Fashion House, playing Sophia Blakely, a rival to Bo Derek's character, Maria Gianni. She has also appeared on the television series Chuck as Dr. Honey Woodcomb, the mother of Captain Awesome. She made another return to soap operas in 2009 when she had a guest role in the daytime series The Bold and the Beautiful. In recent years, she guest-starred in Bones, Revenge and Hot in Cleveland. In 2007 she appeared on Two and a Half Men where she was cast as a cougar who propositions Charlie Harper with the line "What has multiple orgasms and hums?"

Nancy Stafford
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Nancy Stafford is known to millions as Andy Griffith’s law partner on TV’s Matlock. She has been a Series Regular on six network TV shows, including 5 years on Matlock, 3 years on the Emmy-winning St. Elsewhere, ABC’s Sidekicks, and the NBC daytime drama The Doctors. Her 25+ Guest-Star roles include The Mentalist, Frasier, Sci-Fi favorites Quantum Leap and Babylon 5, and a recurring role the final two seasons of ABC’s Scandal.

She won Best Lead Actress in the period short film Common Threads won Best Film at 2017 California Women’s Film Festival, IFS, and Best Shorts Competition. Her films currently streaming include Heritage Falls, Heaven Bound, Faith, Hope & Love, I’m Not Ashamed. And holiday favorites Christmas with a Capital C, Christmas for a Dollar, and Christmas Oranges. Her feature film Directing debut, Damaged Goods, distributed by BMG-Global, is available on Prime. It received the 2021 ICVM Crown Award for Best Narrative Feature and won Best Feature Film at 2021 Knoxville Film Festival. As a producer, she is developing a slate of TV series, films, and stage productions, and is thrilled to be Associate Producer of I'll Be There, the new worldwide stage musical about the life and legacy of Motown’s The Four Tops, debuting 2023. Nancy is the author of two best-selling books published by Penguin Random House. The Wonder of His Love and Beauty by the Book: Seeing Yourself as God Sees You, called by ASSIST News Service, "one of the most valuable books to be published in decades”. A popular speaker, she travels extensively sharing at women's conferences, corporations, and non-profits. Off-screen Nancy serves on the Board of The Greenhouse Arts & Media, which develops and equips creative artists in Hollywood--industry professionals investing in the next generation of writers, directors, producers, actors and crew. She devotes extensive time as Guest Artist/Speaker at media events and performing arts schools nationwide where she motivates and challenges others to live lives of significance and pursue their dreams with excellence. Nancy began her career as a Ford Model in New York, appearing on dozens of magazine covers and more than 150 national commercials for companies like Revlon, Coke, and P&G. She is a journalism graduate of the University of Florida, and a former Miss Florida in the Miss America Pageant. Nancy’s husband, Larry Myers, is a member of The Academy of Country Music Award-winning band Brush Arbor. Nancy and Larry have been married for 33 years and live in Los Angeles. She has had many roles, but her favorite is step-mom to beautiful Katie, and Grandma to 21-year-old Blake.

Patrick Kilpatrick
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Patrick Kilpatrick is an American actor, director, screenwriter, producer, journalist, international entertainment speaker and teacher. He has appeared in over 180 films and television series.

His action-film villain appearances include Showdown (1993), The Replacement Killers (1998), Eraser (1996), Last Man Standing (1996), Minority Report (2002), Under Siege 2: Dark Territory (1995), Death Warrant (film) (1990),The Presidio (1988), and two Westerns opposite Tom Selleck, Last Stand at Saber River (1997) and Crossfire Trail (2001). Kilpatrick also starred in Free Willy 3: The Rescue (1997). In one 18-month period Kilpatrick, reportedly acted in five major-studio films and two independent films while making 27 television guest-star spots on 18 different shows.[citation needed] Other appearances include films such as Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins (1985); 3 Ninjas Knuckle Up (1995), and the PBS miniseries American Playhouse: Roanoak (1981), which became the largest production in the history of PBS. Television appearances include Dark Angel; Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman (1994); Walker, Texas Ranger (1994); Babylon 5 (1995); Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman as Sergeant O'Connor for 9 episodes from 1996 to 1997; ER (1997); The X-Files (2001); General Hospital (2003); CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (2005); 24 (2005); Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles (2008) and Chuck ("Chuck Versus the Gravitron"). He co-starred in the Star Trek: Voyager episodes "Initiations" (1995) and "Drive" (2000) and in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "The Siege of AR-558" (1998).

Patrick Labyorteaux
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Patrick Francis Labyorteaux is an American actor, television producer and television writer. In many of his earlier credits, his last name is spelled as "Laborteaux".He is best known for his roles of Andrew "Andy" Garvey on the NBC series Little House on the Prairie as well as Bud Roberts on the CBS series JAG and NCIS.

Labyorteaux, also credited as Patrick Laborteaux in his early career, starred on television and in film. His well-known TV roles are on the hit NBC series Little House on the Prairie as Andrew "Andy" Garvey from 1977–81, and on the CBS hit series JAG as Lt. Cmdr. Bud Roberts from 1995 to 2005, a role he reprised in three episodes of JAG's spin-off, NCIS. Other TV shows on which he has made guest appearances include Starsky & Hutch, 21 Jump Street, Living Single, Yes, Dear, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, The Love Boat, Ghost Whisperer, and iCarly. He starred in films as well. He played Peter, great-nephew to Lucille Ball in the 1974 film "Mame." One of his well-known roles is in the 1987 comedy film Summer School as football player Kevin Winchester alongside future JAG/NCIS costar Mark Harmon. He appeared in the 1989 cult film Heathers as Ram Sweeney. He voices cartoons such as Spider-Man: The Animated Series, Godzilla: The Series and others.

Peter Deyell
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Screentested (as Robin) for the 1966 "Batman" TV series alongside Lyle Waggoner (as Batman). Portions of this are seen on "Hollywood Screentests, Take 1"

A life member of the National Eagle Scouts Association, Was one of the founders of The Artists Rights Foundation (now known as The Film Foundation), dedicated to the preservation of historic films. Other founding members included J. Paul Getty, Jr., Steven Spielberg, Allen Daviau, Frank Pierson, Arthur Hiller, Sydney Pollack, Gene Reynolds, George Lucas and Martin Scorsese. Introduced Steven Spielberg to cinematographer Allen Daviau, who went on to shoot six of Spielberg's early films, including E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, The Color Purple, and Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. As a child actor, got his first agent with the help of British actor Basil Rathbone. Was Steven Spielberg's Assistant Director when Steven made shorts.

RJ Mitte
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Roy Frank "RJ" Mitte III (born August 21, 1992) is an American actor, best known for playing Walter "Flynn" White Jr. on the AMC series Breaking Bad (2008–2013). Like his character on the show, he has cerebral palsy. After moving to Hollywood in 2006, he began training with personal talent manager Addison Witt. They sought acting opportunities where his disability would serve to educate viewers, which led him to audition for the role in Breaking Bad.

After receiving several roles as an extra, including in the Disney series Hannah Montana, Mitte became interested in films and decided to take acting lessons. Shortly after, he was offered the role of Walter White Jr., a character who also has cerebral palsy, in the AMC series Breaking Bad.[1] At the 2013 Media Access Awards, Mitte received the SAG-AFTRA Harold Russell Award for his portrayal of Walter White Jr. on the series and also presented the eponymous RJ Mitte Diversity Award to deaf actor Ryan Lane. The Screen Actors Guild named Mitte as the spokesman for actors with disabilities and he is the representative of "Inclusion in the Arts and Media of Performers with Disabilities", which employs artists with disabilities. In 2011, he starred in the short horror film Stump. That same year, he worked as executive producer of the documentary Vanished: The Tara Calico Story, that deals with the disappearance of Tara Calico. In 2012 Mitte was cast in the thriller film House of Last Things. In 2013, Mitte appeared in the music video for "Dead Bite" by rapcore band Hollywood Undead. He also appeared in the video for a song titled "If I Get High" by Nothing But Thieves in 2016. In January 2014, he began a recurring role on the ABC Family drama series Switched at Birth portraying Campbell, a premed student paralyzed from a snowboarding accident who uses a wheelchair. On 17 November 2015, Mitte was announced to be a presenter as part of British Channel 4's coverage of the 2016 Rio Summer Paralympics.

Sam Kwasman
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Sam is a veteran actor/comedian. From a professional dancer in movies such as "Mame" with Lucille Ball and stage musicals like "Hello Dolly" with Martha Raye and the "Music Man" with Van Johnson, he graduated to acting roles. He has Guest Starred on such shows as "Bob Newhart"(Emmy nomination), "Family Ties" "Lou Grant", "Airwolf", "MadTV" "Evening at the Improv" "Norm Crosbys Comedy Shop" and "The Jerry Lewis Telethon". Not to mention voice overs for cartoons such as "Robot Chicken" with Seth Green and many, many on camera appearances in national commercials.

As a stand up, he has appeared at Caesars Palace Lake Tahoe, the Alladin Hotel, the Riviera, Rodneys Place, the Comedy Store, the Improv, the Ice House and comedy clubs around the country. Over a 17 year period Sam worked on and off as the voice of Donald Duck at Disney studios. He is in the book, "Mouse Tracks" featuring Sam as the Duck. On Cartoon Network, he has voiced several characters for Seth Green's, "Robot Chicken" and is a series regular as the voice of Little Quacker for the new Tom and Jerry Show, now in it's Fourth season. His most current film is, "Too Hip for the Room." He is also appearing as the product placement guy for Jerry Seinfeld's, "Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee." He is appearing at the Geffen Theater in the new hit show "Letters From a Nut" by Ted L. Nancy. Produced by Jerry Seinfeld.

Sam McMurray
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Sam McMurray (born April 15, 1952) is an American actor. He is known for his roles as dentist Vic Schweiber on Freaks and Geeks, Supervisor Patrick O'Boyle in the CBS sitcom series The King of Queens, Trent Culpepper in the sitcom Cristela and for voicing Roy in the family sitcom television series Dinosaurs. He also appeared as Doug on the NBC sitcom Friends, and as Ned on the CBS sitcom Mom.

Among McMurray's film credits are Raising Arizona, National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, Drop Dead Gorgeous, L.A. Story, The Wizard as Jimmy's stepfather Mr. Bateman, and C.H.U.D. On television, he was a regular on The Tracey Ullman Show, played a recurring role as Chandler's boss on Friends, he also appeared in The King of Queens as Doug and Deacon's boss and also appeared in Disney's Recess, Freaks and Geeks, Home Improvement, The Sopranos, The Tick and Breaking Bad. He is also noted for being the first-ever guest star on The Simpsons. McMurray gained much international recognition among gamers for his role as the voice of "BBC Newscaster/American Newscaster" in the expansion for Command & Conquer: Generals. He also appeared in the 2011 TV film Holiday Engagement. For the 2014–2015 television season, McMurray had a main role as Trent Culpepper in the ABC comedy series Cristela.

Scott Schwartz
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Scott Schwartz (born May 12, 1968) is an American child actor best known for his roles in The Toy, A Christmas Story and Kidco.

Schwartz co-starred opposite Richard Pryor and Jackie Gleason in 1982's The Toy directed by Richard Donner. In 1982, Schwartz filmed Kidco directed by Ronald F. Maxwell. In 1983, he featured in the Christmas film A Christmas Story as Flick, who got his tongue stuck to a frozen flagpole. In 1985, Schwartz co-starred with Liza Minnelli, Corey Haim, and Jeffrey DeMunn in the television film A Time to Live. Schwartz grew up in Bridgewater Township, New Jersey, and attended Eisenhower Junior High School. He attended high school in 1982/3 and 1985/6 at Bridgewater-Raritan High School West in Bridgewater, with future professional basketball player Eric Murdock. He moved on to attend the Professional Children's School from 1983 to 1985. Since 1987, he has managed a sports and movie memorabilia collectibles store, Sports and Movie Stuff, with his father Dan Schwartz in Simi Valley, California. Schwartz' father was Elvis Presley's US Army company clerk in Germany from 1958 to 1960. In the 1990s, Schwartz worked in the adult film industry in minor, non-sexual roles, and behind the scenes in numerous administrative roles. Schwartz would eventually star in adult films in sexual roles. After appearing in more than a dozen films in a non-sexual capacity, he quit in 2000. Since 2006, Schwartz has pursued his acting career, and helped create a line of celebrity-based trading cards for Donruss. He has also obtained celebrity autographs for companies such as: Upper Deck, Razor, Leaf, and In the Game. In 2008, Schwartz began writing for the sports card magazine Beckett, and was featured on the cover of the September 2008 issue of Sports Card Monthly alongside Darren McFadden and Josh Hamilton. In the wake of his former castmate Corey Haim's death in March 2010, Schwartz sold Haim's personal belongings on eBay at the behest of the Haim family. Schwartz is also president of A Minor Consideration, a child actors' advocacy organization established in 1990 by actor Paul Petersen.

Shaun Weiss
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Shaun Weiss (born August 27, 1978) is an American actor, well known for his roles in The Mighty Ducks movies.

Weiss started his acting career as Elvis on Pee-wee's Playhouse, but his breakout role came when he earned the part of Greg Goldberg in The Mighty Ducks films. After the first two Mighty Ducks movies, he appeared as Josh Birnbaum in the Disney film Heavyweights. He also appeared in a reoccurring role as peripheral freak "Sean" on the short-lived NBC dramedy Freaks and Geeks, as well as cameo appearances on The King of Queens. He appeared in commercials for Captain Morgan, Castrol, Verizon Communications, and Mobile ESPN.

Sid Krofft
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In 2020, Mr. Krofft began hosting "Sundays with Sid," a live show on his Instagram account in which he reminisced about his long life and diverse career. Sid and Marty Krofft were awarded a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6201 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California.

The Kroffts were awarded the Lifetime Career Award at the 2003 Saturn Awards for being the creative minds behind some of the most imaginative and beloved fantasy shows on television Krofft's first filmgoing experience was The Wizard of Oz. A neighbor sneaked him into a premiere screening at The Majestic Theater in Providence, Rhode Island, on August 13, 1939. He later toured as the opening act for Judy Garland, and his fame exploded in 1969 with the creation of the TV series "H.R. Pufnstuf," which he freely admits was influenced by the movie. Krofft used to drive a custom Dodge van that said "L.A. Snake Farm" on the sides. On the dashboard was a sign declaring "Danger: Poisonous Snakes!," and as he was disengaging the vehicle, he'd turn on a cassette of hissing serpents. No one ever messed with the van, but he was frequently questioned about the snake farm.

Tané McClure
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Tane McClure (aka) Tané Cain, is a lifelong entertainment industry professional with over 100 film, television and music credits. As an actress, she is best known for her starring and co-starring roles in feature films, including “Legally Blonde” with Reece Witherspoon; “A Woman Scorned 2” starring with Andrew Stevens; “Illicit Dreams 2”; “Caged Hearts” with Carrie Genzel; “Cruel Intentions 2” with Amy Adams; “Go”; “Trance” with Martin Kove; “Shadow Hours”; “Inferno” with Don-the-Dragon Wilson, and “Crawl Space” with Claus Kinski. She was a series regular on the Showtime series “Sherman Oaks”, and the Cinemax series “Night Cap”. Some of her other notable guest starring roles include: “Bay Watch Nights”, “Days of Our Lives”, and the western series “The Virginian” starring opposite her father, actor Doug McClure.

As singer-songwriter under the name Tané Cain, she obtained a Top 40 hit single: "Holding On" as well as 3 songs for the original "Terminator" soundtrack. Tané also can be seen starring in the Toby Keith music video: “You Shouldn’t Kiss Me Like This”. As a producer, writer/director/editor, some of Tané's award winning film and television projects include: National Journalism Award Winner "Love Betty White"; National Journalism Nominated "Just Call Me Hef"-The Hugh Hefner Story, NYIFVF Award Winner Best Fantasy Feature Film "Trance"; and the highly acclaimed short films "RockStar" and “Voyager 2150”, with many film festival awards and accolades. Additionally, Tané is the author of a best-selling book: "Rescue Heart: A Love Story", based on her feature film screenplay that has won multiple awards.

Teresa Ganzel
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Ganzel is probably known best as a recurring cast member of The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson in the role of the Matinee Lady in the popular "Tea Time Movie" skits. She has often played stereotypical ditzy blonde bimbo roles, including as Greedy Gretchen in the Three's Company episode "Lies My Roommate Told Me" (1981), National Lampoon's Movie Madness (1982), the film The Toy (1982) with Jackie Gleason and Richard Pryor, and the Married... with Children episode "A Three Job, No Income Family" (1989)

In 1984, Ganzel played another young and ditzy blonde, Sheree Winkler, in the short-lived sitcom The Duck Factory, which introduced a young Jim Carrey to American audiences. She was a frequent game show celebrity in the 1980s, particularly on the $25,000 and $100,000 incarnations of Pyramid, as well as a recurring celebrity on the 1986–1989 version of Hollywood Squares. She also appeared as a celebrity in the game show pilot for Money in the Blank (1987). Ganzel has had several voice-over roles on cartoons, animated movies, and series, notably Cow and Chicken, The Emperor's New School, Monsters, Inc., Goof Troop, Aaahh!!! Real Monsters, Rugrats, and Horton Hears a Who!. Her first venture into voice acting was playing Kitty Glitter in Top Cat and the Beverly Hills Cats. Her best-known role in animation, Miss Vavoom, is an homage to all of the sexy film stars, singers, and damsels in distress who served as Droopy's love interest in the Tex Avery cartoons. Ganzel appears in Tom & Jerry Kids and Droopy, Master Detective.

Thomas Ian Nicholas
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Thomas Ian Nicholas is an American film actor, Nicholas is best known for playing Henry Rowengartner in Rookie of the Year, Walt Disney in Walt Before Mickey and Kevin Myers in the American Pie film series. He stars in the 2021 film Adverse with Mickey Rourke.

Nicholas is known for his roles in Rookie of the Year (1993) and American Pie (1999). He appeared in the four theatrical films of the American Pie franchise, as the character Kevin Myers, played Mitchel in the Roger Avary-directed The Rules of Attraction, played Frank Sinatra, Jr. in the Showtime movie Stealing Sinatra, and co-starred in Halloween: Resurrection. In 2009, he played the role of a rookie cop in the drama Life Is Hot in Cracktown. with Lara Flynn Boyle. Nicholas played Eugene in the supporting cast of Nicole Holofcener's film Please Give, which won the 2010 Independent Spirit Robert Altman Award, given to the ensemble cast He had the role of Abbie Hoffman in the film The Chicago 8. He also appeared on an episode of ABC's Grey's Anatomy as Jeremiah. Recent releases include Walt Before Mickey, where Nicholas portrays a young Walt Disney during the struggles of his early life and career. He was also a series regular on Steven Spielberg's TV drama series Red Band Society. Nicholas is the lead actor in the Lionsgate film "Adverse", opposite Mickey Rourke, Sean Astin, Lou Diamond Phillips and Penelope Ann Miller.

Tom Skerritt
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Tom Skerritt is an American actor who has appeared in more than 40 films and more than 200 television episodes since 1962. He is known for his film roles in M*A*S*H, Alien, The Dead Zone, Top Gun, A River Runs Through It, and Up in Smoke, and the television series Picket Fences. Skerritt has earned several nominations and awards, including winning the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series in 1993 for Picket Fences.

Skerritt made his film debut in War Hunt, produced by Terry Sanders and released in 1962. Skerritt's notable film appearances include M*A*S*H (1970), Harold and Maude (credited as "M. Borman", 1971), Big Bad Mama, Cheech & Chong's Up in Smoke (1978), Ice Castles (1978), as Captain Dallas in Alien (1979) as a would-be astronaut in Contact (1997) and SpaceCamp (1986), and in Top Gun (1986) as Commander Mike "Viper" Metcalf. In 1988, he starred with Nancy Allen and Lara Flynn Boyle in Poltergeist III. In 1989, he played the role of Thomas Drummond "Drum" Eatenton in Steel Magnolias. In 1992, he appeared in the critically acclaimed Robert Redford-directed film A River Runs Through It, playing a fly-fishing loving minister and father of the two protagonist brothers in the film. Skerritt played a guest part in Ray Walston's show My Favorite Martian in the 1963 episode "Mrs. Jekyll and Hyde" (Walston was a regular cast member 30 years later in Skerritt's show Picket Fences). He also guest-starred in the television series The Real McCoys (1963), as a letter carrier in the episode "Aunt Win Steps In". He was cast in Bonanza in 1964 and on Death Valley Days in 1965, as a young gambler, Patrick Hogan, who meets a tragic fate after winning a small fortune in a saloon. In another Death Valley Days episode, "A Sense of Justice" (1966), he played a young Roy Bean with his older brother, Joshua Bean, played by Tris Coffin. In a later Death Valley Days role, Skerritt played Mark Twain in the 1968 episode "Ten Day Millionaires", with Dabney Coleman as Twain's mining partner, Calvin H. Higby. The two lose a fortune in gold, but Twain learns his future is in writing. In 1972, Skerritt guest-starred in an episode of Cannon, entitled "Nobody Beats the House," playing the role of a young gambler. In 1975, he guest-starred in another episode of Cannon entitled "The Conspirators," playing the role of a corrupt sheriff. Skerritt appeared in the ABC series Twelve O'Clock High (1964–1967), five episodes; Gunsmoke (1965–1972, also five episodes), and as Evan Drake on Cheers. He then appeared in CBS's Picket Fences (1992–1996), in the role of Sheriff Jimmy Brock, for which he won an Emmy Award. More recently, he has starred in Homeland Security and The Grid. He portrayed the deceased William Walker on Brothers & Sisters, having appeared in the pilot and several flashbacks scenes. This was his second time playing the husband of Sally Field; the first was in Steel Magnolias. He played the role of Ezekiel on ABC Family's miniseries Fallen alongside Paul Wesley. He also appeared as the guide on the showcase website for Microsoft's Windows Vista operating system. He lent his voice in the video game Gun (2005), where he voices Clay Allison. He then guest-starred in seasons three and four of Leverage as Nate Ford's father In February 2012, Skerritt played the title role in Pacific Northwest Ballet's production of Don Quixote. In 2014, Skerritt was reunited with his ex-Picket Fences co-star, Lauren Holly, to star with her in Field of Lost Shoes He was reunited with his Alien co-star Harry Dean Stanton in Lucky, the latter's last film (2017).

Veronica Cartwright
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Veronica Cartwright is an American actress. She is known for appearing in science fiction and horror films, and has earned numerous accolades, such as three Primetime Emmy Award nominations.

As a child actress, she appeared in supporting roles in The Children's Hour and The Birds, the latter of which was Cartwright's first commercial success. She made her transition into mainstream, mature roles with 1978's Invasion of the Body Snatchers. The following year, she played Lambert in the science-fiction horror film Alien, which earned her recognition and a Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress. She additionally appeared in the films The Right Stuff and The Witches of Eastwick which earned her praise, and in the 1990s, received three nominations for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series, one of which was for her role on ER and two of which were for her role in The X-Files. In 1958, her career as a child actress began with a role in In Love and War. Among her early appearances were repeated roles in the television series Leave It to Beaver (as Beaver's classmates Violet Rutherford and, later, Peggy MacIntosh) and episodes of One Step Beyond "The Haunting" (1960) and The Twilight Zone "I Sing the Body Electric" (1962) In 1963, she guest starred twice in NBC's medical drama about psychiatry, The Eleventh Hour, in the episodes "The Silence of Good Men" and "My Name is Judith, I'm Lost, You See". Cartwright's breakout feature was the science-fiction horror film Alien (1979), for which she was originally cast as Alien's heroine Ellen Ripley, but director Ridley Scott instead set her to play Lambert prior to shooting. The infamous chestburster scene in the film featured a genuine reaction from Cartwright, who had not been informed beforehand that blood would be involved; co-star Tom Skerritt confirmed this by saying "What you saw on camera was the real response. She had no idea what the hell happened. All of a sudden this thing just came up." She won the Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance Cartwright appeared in the films The Children's Hour (1961) and Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds (1963), which were both highly successful. In The Birds, she was cast along with her television father from Leave It to Beaver, Richard Deacon, although the two were not on screen together. She appeared in Spencer's Mountain (1963) with Henry Fonda and Kym Karath. She played daughter Jemima Boone in the first two seasons of NBC's Daniel Boone from 1964 until 1966, with co-stars Fess Parker, Patricia Blair, Darby Hinton, Ed Ames and Dallas McKennon. She won a regional Emmy Award for the television movie Tell Me Not in Mournful Numbers (1964). She achieved adult success with film roles in Inserts (1974), Goin' South (1978), and Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978). Her subsequent film roles include The Right Stuff (1983), Flight of the Navigator (1986), The Witches of Eastwick (1987), Money Talks (1997), Scary Movie 2 (2001), Kinsey (2004) and Straight-Jacket (2004). She was nominated again for the Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress for The Witches of Eastwick. A frequent performer in television, she has played guest roles in such series as Route 66, Leave it to Beaver, The Mod Squad, Miami Vice, Baywatch, L.A. Law, ER, The X-Files, Chicago Hope, Will & Grace, Touched by an Angel, Judging Amy, Six Feet Under, The Closer, and Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. Cartwright has received three Emmy Award nominations, one for her work in ER in 1997, and two for her work on The X-Files in 1998 and 1999. Cartwright also starred as Mrs. Olive Osmond in the made-for-TV film Inside the Osmonds. She co-starred in the fourth version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The Invasion (2007). She appears on the cover art for the Scissor Sisters' 2006 single "I Don't Feel Like Dancin'" as well as on their second album Ta-Dah In 2014, Cartwright reprised her role as Joan Lambert for DLC episodes in Alien: Isolation based on the original film, and appeared in the remake of The Town That Dreaded Sundown. She played the role of Sibley Gamble, a psychic on General Hospital between July 8, 2019 and July 16, 2019.

Vicki Lawrence
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Vicki Lawrence is an American actress, comedian, and pop singer. She is best known for her character Mama (Thelma Harper). Lawrence originated multitudes of characters beyond Mama on CBS's The Carol Burnett Show from 1967 to 1978, the variety show's entire series run.

In The Carol Burnett Show's 7th season, Lawrence debuted her famed Mama role on a comedy sketch called The Family. Only created as a one-off skit, The Family's unexpected success with audiences led to it having recurring installments for the final 5 seasons of the program. With Lawrence portraying the character of a cold, unaffectionate, widowed elderly mother to the neurotic, misfortunate Eunice (played by Burnett despite Lawrence being 16 years younger), The Family bred some of The Carol Burnett Show's most famed blooper moments. The success of The Family skits eventually spun off into Lawrence landing her own television sitcom, Mama's Family, her character becoming the focal point and Mama's traits expanding and evolving dramatically. Continuing Mama's evolution, Lawrence has hosted an untelevised stand-up comedy routine since 2001, "Vicki and Mama: A Two Woman Show." Moreover, Lawrence has made numerous post-Mama's Family guest TV show appearances in her famed Mama role. In 1973, Lawrence became a one-hit wonder songstress, landing on the U.S. chart with "The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia". It reached number one on both the United States and Canada charts. Lawrence has multiple Emmy Award nominations, winning one in 1976. She is also a multiple Golden Globe nominee, all for The Carol Burnett Show. Most recently, Lawrence starred in the Fox sitcom series The Cool Kids from 2018 to 2019. As a comedian and actress, Lawrence is known for her work on The Carol Burnett Show, of which she was a part from 1967 to 1978. She was the only cast member, except for Burnett herself, who stayed on the show for the entire 11 seasons. After The Carol Burnett Show ended in 1978, Lawrence and her husband Al Schultz moved with their children to Maui, Hawaii, but after a few years, returned to Los Angeles, where they have remained. Her portrayal of the Mama character on The Carol Burnett Show's "The Family" sketches was so popular that NBC subsequently created the sitcom Mama's Family, elaborating on the Mama character. (Burnett reprised the Eunice Higgins character for the sitcom from time to time.) The series ran from 1983 to 1985 on NBC; after its cancellation from NBC, it was renewed from 1986 to 1990 in first-run syndication. The show was more successful in the renewed version. She also reprised the Mama character on stage for Vicki Lawrence & Mama: A Two-Woman Show. Lawrence has made appearances on other programs, such as the sitcoms Laverne & Shirley, Major Dad, Roseanne, Hannah Montana, and Yes, Dear. Between the NBC and syndication runs of Mama's Family, Lawrence starred in the 1985 comedy pilot Anything for Love, which aired as a special on CBS that summer and co-starred Lauren Tewes and Rebeca Arthur. Lawrence has also appeared with Burnett, Korman, and Tim Conway in the Burnett show retrospectives that were broadcast in 1993, 2001, and 2004. Lawrence played Sister Mary Paul (Sister Amnesia) in the TV special based on Nunsense Jamboree that originally aired on TNN in 1998. Lawrence played Mamaw Stewart (the mother of Robby Ray Stewart and grandmother of Jackson and Miley Stewart) in the hit Disney series Hannah Montana alongside Billy Ray Cyrus and his daughter Miley Cyrus. Lawrence played as Mama in an Ohio commercial, promoting a constitutional amendment that would permit casino gambling in Ohio. Lawrence played Dan's old high-school flame, Phyllis, in an episode of Roseanne. She also appeared in a special celebrity-edition episode of the Anne Robinson version of The Weakest Link. Playing for a charity, she made it to the final two but ended up losing to Ed Begley, Jr.

William Daniels
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William Daniels is an American actor, who is best recognized for his television roles, notably as Mark Craig in the drama series St. Elsewhere, for which he won two Primetime Emmy Awards; the voice of KITT in the television series Knight Rider; and as George Feeny in the sitcom Boy Meets World, which earned him four People's Choice Award nominations. He reprised his Knight Rider role in the sequel TV movie Knight Rider 2000 and his Boy Meets World role in the sequel series Girl Meets World.

Daniels' film roles include Mr. Braddock (Benjamin Braddock's father) in The Graduate, Howard in Two for the Road, John Adams in the musical film 1776, and Carter Nash in Captain Nice. He was president of the Screen Actors Guild from 1999 to 2001 and led the union's efforts during the 2000 commercial actors strike. Daniels began his career as a member of the singing Daniels family in Brooklyn. He made his television debut as part of a variety act (along with other members of his family) in 1943, on NBC, then a single station in New York He made his Broadway debut in 1943 in Life with Father and remained a busy Broadway actor for decades afterwards. His Broadway credits include roles in 1776, A Thousand Clowns, On a Clear Day You Can See Forever, and A Little Night Music. He received an Obie Award for The Zoo Story (1960). Daniels's motion picture debut was as a school principal in the 1963 anti-war drama film Ladybug Ladybug. In 1965, he reprised his Broadway role as a child welfare worker in the screen version of A Thousand Clowns. In 1967 he appeared in The Graduate as the father of Dustin Hoffman's character. In 1969, Daniels starred as John Adams in the Broadway musical 1776; he also appeared in the film version in 1972. Two years later, he co-starred in Richard Donner's telefilm Sarah T. - Portrait of a Teenage Alcoholic. in 1979 he again reprised his role as the outspoken John Adams in the film Rebels, again about the American revolution, without seeming to ever break character. He is known as the quintessential John Adams. Daniels's first network television appearance came in 1952 when he portrayed the young John Quincy Adams, eldest son of John and Abigail Adams in the Hallmark Hall of Fame drama A Woman for the Ages. In 1976, he reprised the role as the middle-aged and elder John Quincy Adams in the acclaimed PBS miniseries The Adams Chronicles. He starred in the short-lived series Captain Nice as police chemist Carter Nash. He appeared as acid-tongued Dr. Mark Craig in St. Elsewhere from 1982 to 1988, for which he won two Emmy awards. Concurrently, he provided the voice of KITT in Knight Rider from 1982 to 1986. Daniels said in 1982, "My duties on Knight Rider are very simple. I do it in about an hour and a half. I've never met the cast. I haven't even met the producer. He reprised the voice-only role of KITT in 1991 for the television movie Knight Rider 2000, and again in the theatrical comedy movie The Benchwarmers. He performed the role in AT&T and GE commercials about talking machines, and twice in The Simpsons as well as at the Comedy Central Roast of his co-star David Hasselhoff He reprised the role of KITT in the 2015 Lego-themed action-adventure video game Lego Dimensions.[ Daniels portrayed strict but loving educator George Feeny at John Adams High School in Boy Meets World from 1993 to 2000. In addition to the previously mentioned 1967 superhero sitcom Captain Nice, he was a regular on the 1970s TV series Freebie and the Bean and The Nancy Walker Show.[citation needed] A familiar character actor, he has appeared as a guest star on numerous TV comedies and dramas, including Soap, The Rockford Files, Quincy, M.E., Kolchak: The Night Stalker, and many others. In 2012, Daniels appeared in the ninth season of Grey's Anatomy as Dr. Craig Thomas, an unlikely mentor to the character of Dr. Cristina Yang played by actress Sandra Oh. His character, Dr. Thomas, died in the operating room while performing a procedure to repair a heart defect midway through the season, which forced Yang to move back to Seattle. In 2014, Daniels reprised his role as Mr. Feeny in the pilot episode of the Boy Meets World spinoff, Girl Meets World. He cameoed in the final scene, praising the adult Cory Matthews for his parenting. He made additional appearances in the second and third seasons.

Postponed Celebrities

Anne Lockhart
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Anne Lockhart is an American actress. She is best known for her role as Lieutenant Sheba in the television series Battlestar Galactica (1978–1979).

Lockhart began her career at the age of four, starring as Annie in the short film "T Is for Tumbleweed", which was nominated for an Academy Award in the category Best Live Action Short Film. She frequently accompanied her mother to the set of Lassie, where she made five uncredited appearances between 1959 and 1962. She began making credited guest appearances in 1965 starting with the Death Valley Days episode "Magic Locket". She has since made over 60 guest appearances in network television shows, including multiple appearances on series such as Knight Rider, Simon & Simon, The Fall Guy, Murder, She Wrote, and Diagnosis: Murder. In 1979, she appeared as Lieutenant Sheba in 11 episodes of Battlestar Galactica. She also appeared as Officer Kathy Mulligan in the CHiPs episode "The Return of the Super Cycle", and in the episode "A Dream of Jennifer" on Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. In 1980, she appeared in a Magnum PI episode "Lest We Forget" playing a World War II flashback version of character Diane Westmore played by her mother June Lockhart. Through the 1980s and '90s, Lockhart appeared steadily in a variety of credited and uncredited roles primarily on television series She appeared on Airwolf in episodes, "Random Target" in season two and "Day of Jeopardy" in season three, playing different characters. In the 2000s and 2010s, Lockhart had several recurring and multiepisode minor roles on series such as The Lying Game, Dragnet, The West Wing, NCIS, the Law & Order franchise shows, and Chicago Fire. These roles were often "uncredited" and as a "policewoman". She also had similar one-time roles on shows such as Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip, Raines, and Chase. She also appeared in BJ & the Bear in the episode " Fire in the Hole " Lockhart's first film role was playing Dora in the 1973 Western Jory. That same year, she appeared in the critically acclaimed Hallmark Hall of Fame episode Lisa, Bright and Dark, alongside Kay Lenz, Anne Baxter, and John Forsythe. She then appeared in the films Sunburst (1975) and Joyride (1977), with Robert Carradine and Melanie Griffith. She played the young Eunice St. Clair in the 1986 horror film Troll, with her mother playing the older version of her character. Her other film credits include Just Tell Me You Love Me (1978), Hambone and Hillie (1983) opposite Lillian Gish, Youn Warriors (1983), The Oasis (1984), The Serpent Warriors (1985), Dark Tower (1989), Big Bad John (1990), Bug Buster (1998), A Dog's Tale (1999), Daybreak (2000), Cahoots (2001), Hollywood, It's a Dog's Life (2004), ExTerminators (2009), and Dakota's Summer (2014). Though Lockhart herself claims no recollection of being approached she was reportedly John Carpenter's first choice to play the role of main character Laurie Strode in Halloween (1978). Other commitments kept her from doing so.

Gerard Christopher
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Gerard Christopher is an American actor, writer and producer. He was the second actor to play the role of Superboy in the television series of the same name (from 1989 to 1992), replacing John Haymes Newton who played the role in season one (1988–1989).During his tenure on Superboy he would later also be a producer and writer on the series. He has performed in a number of telemovies, and was a guest star on daytime soap operas such as Days of Our Lives and Sunset Beach, and the prime time soap opera Melrose Place. He has also starred in the comedy movie Tomboy (1985).

Christopher auditioned for the part of Superman / Clark Kent in Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman and was chosen by the casting director. However, when the producers learned he had essentially already played the role, he was dismissed in favor of Dean Cain His most recent film role (as of 2003) was "Zack" in the movie The First of May (1999). He also appeared as himself on the 2006 television documentary Look, Up in the Sky: The Amazing Story of Superman talking about his time on Superboy.

Joanna Cassidy
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Joanna Cassidy is an American actress. She is known for her roles as the replicant Zhora Salome in Blade Runner (1982) and Dolores in Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988). She has won a Golden Globe Award, was nominated for three Emmy Awards and also was nominated for a Saturn Award and Screen Actors Guild Awards.

Cassidy also has starred in films such as Under Fire (1983), The Fourth Protocol (1987), The Package (1989), Where the Heart Is (1990), Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead (1991), Vampire in Brooklyn (1995), and Ghosts of Mars (2001). From 2001 to 2005, she played Margaret Chenowith on the HBO drama series Six Feet Under for which she received a Primetime Emmy Award nomination. From 2011 to 2013, she played Joan Hunt on the ABC series Body of Proof, and from 2010 to 2013 starred in the HBO Canada comedy series Call Me Fitz for which she won two Canadian Screen Awards. Cassidy's first film appearance was in The Outfit (1973). She appeared in a 1973 Smokey Bear public service announcement (PSA) and on such television series as Mission: Impossible, Starsky & Hutch and Taxi. She had a small role in Stay Hungry (1976), a film about bodybuilding that featured a young Arnold Schwarzenegger. Cassidy was considered for the role of Wonder Woman for a television series, but lost it to Lynda Carter. She co-starred in the film Our Winning Season (1978). Her first regular role was as sheriff's pilot Morgan Wainwright in the action-adventure series 240-Robert (1979), although the series only lasted for two abbreviated seasons. Afterwards, Cassidy continued to appear in guest roles in series such as Dallas and Falcon Crest, as well as a regular role on the short-lived sitcom Buffalo Bill (1983) (for which she earned a Golden Globe Award). She starred on the short-lived NBC television series Code Name: Foxfire (1985). In 1982, Cassidy had her first major feature film role as the replicant snake performer Zhora Salome in Ridley Scott's Blade Runner The following year, she co-starred in Under Fire with Gene Hackman and Nick Nolte. She continued to appear in both films and television; she co-starred in the television miniseries Hollywood Wives (1985), and appeared in The Fourth Protocol (1987), Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988), 1969, The Package (1989), Where the Heart Is (1990) and Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead (1991). In 1993, she co-starred with Dudley Moore on the sitcom Dudley, but the series only lasted for six episodes. She played the ex-wife of James Garner's lead character in the television movie, The Rockford Files: I Still Love L.A. (1994). Her other screen credits from this era include Barbarians at the Gate (1993), the miniseries adaptation of Stephen King's The Tommyknockers (1993), and Wes Craven's Vampire in Brooklyn (1995). Cassidy also provided the voice of Inspector Maggie Sawyer on The WB series Superman: The Animated Series, and had recurring guest roles on television series such as L.A. Law, Melrose Place, Diagnosis: Murder, and The District. Since 2000, Cassidy has appeared in the film Ghosts of Mars (2001) directed by John Carpenter, and had a recurring role as Margaret Chenowith on the HBO drama series Six Feet Under, for which she received an Emmy Award nomination. In 2004, she guest-starred in two episodes of Star Trek: Enterprise as T'Les (the Vulcan mother of Enterprise crewmember T'Pol), and she had a recurring role as Beverly Bridge on the series Boston Legal in 2006. She voiced the villainess Hecubah in the computer game Nox (2000) and once again voiced the character of Maggie Sawyer in the 2002 video game Superman: Shadow of Apokolips. In the spring of 2007, Cassidy donned Zhora's costume once more, 25 years after the release of Blade Runner, to recreate a climactic scene from the film for the fall 2007 Final Cut release of the film. In the original 1982 release, a stunt performer played out Zhora's death scene, with the physical differences between the performer and Cassidy very evident (including the stuntwoman wearing a different wig). For the Final Cut, Cassidy's head was digitally transposed onto footage of the stunt performer, making the death scene fit continuity. According to the DVD featurette, All Our Variant Futures, it was Cassidy herself who suggested this be done; she is captured on video making the suggestion during filming of a retrospective interview related to Blade Runner. In the second season of the NBC series Heroes, she is seen in a photo of the 12 senior members of the show's mysterious company. Beyond appearances in photographs, the actress first appeared as Victoria Pratt in the 10th episode of season two, "Truth & Consequences", during which her character was killed. In 2008–2009, Cassidy appeared in episodes of Ghost Whisperer, Desperate Housewives, Law & Order: UK, and was also seen in the recurring guest role of Amanda Hawthorne, the mother-in-law of Jada Pinkett Smith's eponymous character on the medical drama Hawthorne. In 2011, Cassidy began to appear in a recurring role on the ABC series Body of Proof as Judge Joan Hunt, the mother of Megan Hunt, Dana Delany's character on the series. The series was canceled by ABC after three seasons in May 2013. In 2015, Cassidy was cast as a main character in the Bravo scripted series Odd Mom Out. She plays the role of Candace Von Weber, a snobbish Upper East Side socialite and mother-in-law to the show's protagonist Jill Weber (Jill Kargman)The series was canceled in 2017. In 2019, she co-starred in the Amazon Prime miniseries Too Old to Die Young and later had a recurring role on NCIS: New Orleans.

Karen Grassle
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Karen Grassle is an American actress, known for her role as Caroline Ingalls in the NBC television drama series Little House on the Prairie/

She made her Broadway debut in the short-lived 1968 play The Gingham Dog. Grassle played in Butterflies Are Free on Broadway (as stand-by with Gloria Swanson, Rosemary Murphy, etc.) as well as at the Elitch Theatre in Denver, Colorado, in June 1972, along with Maureen O'Sullivan and Brandon deWilde, who was killed before leaving town after the performances ended. Grassle starred in the Shakespeare in the Park production of Cymbeline with Christopher Walken, Sam Waterston, and Bill Devane. Grassle auditioned for the role of the mother, Caroline Ingalls, in the Little House on the Prairie TV series and won the part. The series ran for nine seasons, from 1974 to 1983. After making the pilot for Little House on the Prairie, Grassle appeared in one episode of Gunsmoke titled "The Wiving" as Fran, one of several saloon girls kidnapped. Subsequently, she acted in the features Harry's War, a 1981 American film where she played Kathy, the wife of Edward Herrmann's title character, and Wyatt Earp, a 1994 film starring Kevin Costner. On television, she starred in and co-wrote the NBC-TV film Battered. Other TV movies include Cocaine: One Man's Seduction, Crisis in MidAir, and Between the Darkness and the Dawn. In episodic TV, she starred in Hotel, Love Boat, and Murder She Wrote (twice). She also appeared on Hollywood Squares and numerous talk shows such as Dinah, Merv Griffin, Mike Douglas, and John Davidson.

Kristy McNichol
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Critically acclaimed actor Kristy McNichol is best known for her role as "Buddy" in the Spelling/Goldberg hit TV series "Family", where she won two Emmy awards, a critic’s choice award for best supporting actress and was nominated for a Golden Globe. Kristy also starred in the hit movie "Little Darlings" with Tatum O'Neil which won her a People's Choice Award. Other TV credits include the Witt, Thomas; Harris hit series "Empty Nest".

Kristy's films include Neil Simon's "Only When I Laugh" with Marsha Mason which earned her a Golden Globe nomination, Alan Pakula's "Dream Lover" and Samuel Fuller's "White Dog". McNichol began her career with guest appearances on such popular TV series as” Starsky and Hutch”, “The Bionic Woman”,” Love American Style”, “ The Love Boat”, “Golden Girls,” and the list goes on. Her first role as a series regular came with the role of Patricia Apple in the CBS television series” Apple's Way”. McNichol began her feature film career in the Burt Reynolds comedy "The End" and went on to star with Dennis Quaid and Mark Hamill in "The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia", "Two Moon Junction" with Louise Fletcher, "The Pirate Movie" with Christopher Atkins, "Just the Way You Are" and "The Forgotten One". Kristy’s known for her athletic abilities, she has competed in “Battle of the Network Stars 1”," Battle of the Network Stars 2”, “Challenge of the Network Stars” and “Us against the World”. Her television movie credits include "Women of Valor", "Like Mom, Like Me", "Summer of My German Soldier", "Love, Mary", “My Old Man" “Blinded by the Light”, “Children of the Bride”, “Mother of the Bride” and “Baby of the Bride”. Kristy’s after school specials include: “Pinballs”, “Fawn Story” and “Me and my Dad’s New Wife”. TV specials: “I Love Liberty” with Martin Sheen, Two “Carpenters Christmas”, “Donny and Marie Show”, “The Osmond Telethon” and the “Jimmy and Kristy” TV special. Kristy works with the Los Angeles Valley College benefiting their music programs and also volunteers at the “Emerald City” assisted living facility in Glendale CA. Kristy McNichol hosted her own tennis tournament for three years benefiting the “Help Group” charity. Kristy also performed voice characters in several animated TV series including "Extreme Ghostbusters and Steven Spielberg’s animated "Invasion America". Kristy McNichol also sang on the soundtracks of “ The Pirate Movie” and “The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia” as well as the RCA Kristy and Jimmy McNichol album. We can’t leave out the “Kristy McNichol Doll” made by the Mattel Toy Company.

Laurette Spang
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Laurette Spang-McCook (born May 16, 1951), credited as Laurette Spang, is an American television actress. She is best known for playing the character Cassiopeia on the original Battlestar Galactica (1978).

After a Universal Studios talent agent spotted her in 1972, Spang signed a 7-year contract with the studio. She then had a succession of guest-starring roles in television series including Emergency! (Episodes: Dinner Date, The Old Engine and Kidding), Adam-12 (Episode: Venice Division), The Streets of San Francisco, The Six Million Dollar Man, Happy Days, Chase, The Secrets of Isis, Charlie's Angels and Lou Grant. Spang also appeared in the television movies Short Walk to Daylight, Runaway! and Sarah T. - Portrait of a Teenage Alcoholic. Towards the end of her contract with Universal (by which time, according to People Weekly Magazine, October 2, 1978) her money was almost exhausted and she had been evicted from an apartment she had been renting), Spang was cast as Cassiopeia in the Battlestar Galactica pilot movie, "Saga of a Star World". An initial draft of the script had her killed off in the pilot film, in which the reptiloid Ovions consumed her, almost cannibal-style. However, the character survived and the network kept her on in a regular role in the subsequent weekly series but "Standards and Practices" (network censors) forced a change of profession upon her. (The censors would no longer allow her to be a socialator, so Glen Larson and Donald P. Bellisario had her character become a medtech in the series, beginning with "Lost Planet of the Gods, Parts 1 & 2"). Spang's later acting performances were in The Love Boat, Fantasy Island, The Dukes of Hazzard, BJ and the Bear, Magnum, P.I., Three's Company, Man from Atlantis, The Gemini Man[6] and more. She took a de facto retirement from acting in 1984, though she made a brief appearance in the 2007 horror film Plot 7, which also featured her by-then husband John McCook. In 2002, Spang appeared in the Battlestar Galactica episode of Sciography documentary series on the Sci-Fi Channel in 2002.

Melanie Chartoff
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Melanie Chartoff is an American actress and comedian. She first became famous for her comedy work on the ABC series Fridays (1980–82), and in the 1990s Fox sitcom "Parker Lewis Can't Lose."

She voiced both 'Didi Pickles' and 'Grandma Minka', Didi's mother on the Nickelodeon animated series "Rugrats" and "All Grown Up!". Melanie's first TV role came in 1976 when she played a nurse on "Search For Tomorrow", after which appeared in the 1978 motion picture "American Hot Wax". She first became a nationally known figure on ABC's "Fridays"." Between the demise of "Fridays" in 1982 and her return to a regular series in 1990 with "Parker Lewis Can't Lose" (in which she co-starred for three seasons as the high-strung Principal Grace Musso), Melanie continued to work steadily on television throughout the 1980s, including appearances on "Mr. Belvedere", "Wiseguy", and "St. Elsewhere", as well as a recurring role on "Newhart" as 'Dr. Kaiser' She made two appearances on "Seinfeld", including one in the 1998 series finale in which four of her former Fridays co-stars were also involved (including Michael Richards). She appeared in the 2006 season finale of Desperate Housewives. Melanie is also an inventor and continues to work in film/TV & theater.

Sarah Rush
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Sarah Rush is an American actress, best known in television for her work in the original Battlestar Galactica. She narrated and starred in the 2005 documentary The Bituminous Coal Queens of Pennsylvania produced by Patricia Heaton and directed by David Hunt, which won the 2006 Heartland Film Festival Award. Rush was herself crowned Coal Queen in 1972.

The Incredible Hulk (1978) — Young Woman (1 episode) Dr. Strange (1978) — Nurse (1 episode) Sword of Justice (1978) — Cathy (1 episode) Battlestar Galactica (1978–1979) — Flight Cpl. Rigel (11 episodes) Happy Days (1979) — Fern (1 episode) (episode "Fonzie and the She-Devils") The Seekers (1979) — Amanda Kent Roughecks (1980) — Carol McBride Quincy, M.E. (1978–1980) — Trish Granby, Dr. Harriett Bowlin (3 episodes) Modesty Blaise (1982) — Emma Woodhouse For Love of Angela (1982) — Angela Tanner Bret Maverick (1982) — Princess Athena (1 episode) Tales from the Darkside (1986) — Laura Burns (1 episode) Monty — Psychic (1 episode) Crossroads Cafe (1996) — Anna Brashov (2 episodes) Everybody Loves Raymond (1998) — Woman (1 episode) Chicken Soup for the Soul (2000) — Mrs. Calloway (1 episode) Friends (2002) — Nurse #3 (1 episode) The Megan Mullally Show (2006) — Herself (1 episode) Monk (2009) — Nurse Judy Fitzgerald (1 episode) Filmography Joni (1979) — Kathy Eareckson The Nude Bomb (1980) — Pam Krovney Years of the Beast (1981) — Cindy The Prodigal (1983) — Laura Talking to Strangers (1988) — Potter Fangs (2001) — Lois Bostwick Max Keeble's Big Move (2001) — Ms. Lane Destiny (2002) — Diane Catch Me If You Can (2002) — Secretary Legally Blonde 2: Red, White & Blonde (2003) The Bituminous Coal Queens of Pennsylvania (2005) — Narrator

Canceled Celebrities

Michael Cole
CANCELED!
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an American actor. His career includes a leading role as Pete Cochran on the television crime drama The Mod Squad, which ran 1968 to 1973.

Cole has appeared in numerous films and TV shows, beginning in 1961 with a role in the film drama, Forbid Them Not. Other film credits include the role of Mark in the 1966 science fiction film, The Bubble, later re-titled Fantastic Invasion of Planet Earth, as Alan Miller in The Last Child (1971), which was nominated for a Golden Globe Award, and as Cliff Norris in Beg, Borrow or Steal (1973). He did a great deal of stage work after The Mod Squad went off the air, such as Cat On A Hot Tin Roof. Cole has also appeared on Gunsmoke, in 1966, as Kipp. During the '70s, he had many guest appearances on Wonder Woman, The Love Boat, CHiPs, and so forth. In the 1980s and 1990s, he worked on a piece for HBO called Nickel Mountain. He also worked on shows such as Murder, She Wrote, Fantasy Island, and Diagnosis Murder. Later, Cole appeared in Stephen King's two-part made-for-TV movie It, which aired in 1990, as the older version of the disturbed Henry Bowers. In 1991, he joined the cast of ABC's General Hospital in the role of Harlan Barrett. But it was his role as Pete Cochran, a troubled youth turned crime fighter in The Mod Squad (1968–1973), that made Cole an international celebrity. Cole's boyish good looks and brooding, deep-voiced personality meshed perfectly with his character's backstory—a ne'er-do-well son of wealthy parents who had evicted him from their home after he had stolen a car. Produced by Aaron Spelling and Danny Thomas, The Mod Squad resonated with counterculture-era viewers and ran for five seasons, during which a total of 123 episodes were produced. According to TVGuide.com, Cole originally balked at the part of Peter Cochran when he realized he would be playing an undercover cop, saying, "I'm not going to take the part of a guy who finks on his friends!" He changed his mind, however, when he read the script and gathered the show's potential appeal. Cole is also known for an embarrassing incident in 1973 which was broadcast live on Australian television during the annual TV Week Logie awards. Stepping on stage to accept an award, Cole – described in subsequent news articles as either drunk or "in a tired and emotional state"– gave a barely coherent "thank you" speech that ended with the actor saying, "Oh, shit." This was the first time this profanity had been heard on Australian television. Cole went through treatment in the Betty Ford Clinic in the early 1990s to bring a drinking problem into remission. Cole continues to act in various film and television projects, and played the character Charles Hadley in a 2006 episode of the NBC television series ER. Cole most recently made an appearance in the 2007 thriller Mr. Brooks as the attorney for Demi Moore's character of Atwood.

Pamela Roylance
CANCELED!
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Pamela Roylance From 1982 to 1984 Roylance played the role of Sarah Reed Carter in the television series Little House On The Prairie. She has also appeared in numerous other television series, including Falcon Crest , MacGyver , Murder is Her Hobby and Grey's Anatomy . In 2010, Roylance starred in the film The Social Network.

Pamela Roylance From 1982 to 1984 Roylance played the role of Sarah Reed Carter in the television series Little House On The Prairie. She has also appeared in numerous other television series, including Falcon Crest , MacGyver , Murder is Her Hobby and Grey's Anatomy . In 2010, Roylance starred in the film The Social Network.

Stan Ivar
First HS appearance!
CANCELED!
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Stan Ivar is an American actor who is best known for his role as John Carter in Little House on the Prairie, and also known for his roles as Ben Robinson in NCIS, Daniel Scott in Days of Our Lives, Mark Johnson in Star Trek: Voyager, and as Captain Mike Davison in the cult movie Creature (1985).

He played blacksmith John Carter in Little House on the Prairie, joining the cast during the final season, and the TV movies Little House: Look Back to Yesterday, Little House: Bless All the Dear Children, and Little House: The Last Farewell Once Little House on the Prairie ended, Ivar asked if he could keep the set Ivar later disassembled the house and moved it out to his home in rural LA County Other notable TV roles include Ben Robinson in NCIS Daniel Scott in Days of Our Lives, Paul Raines in Highway to Heaven, and Mark Johnson in Star Trek: Voyager. He has also had roles in numerous other major television series, including Grapevine General Hospital, Crazy Like a Fox, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Cagney & Lacey, The Practice, St. Elsewhere, The John Larroquette Show, Married with Children, Murder, She Wrote, Beverly Hills, 90210, Beauty and the Beast, Cybill, Matlock, and Moonlighting. He has appeared in several television movies including The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory (1987), Shattered Dreams (1990), The Last Halloween (1991), Torch Song (1993), The Disappearance of Nora (1993), Chance of a Lifetime (1998), and many more. Feature film roles include Creature (1985), The Big Picture (1989), Rock-A-Doodle (1991), Aspen Extreme (1993), and playing Matt LeBlanc's character's father in Ed (1996).